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Crossing the Rubikon

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  • Crossing the Rubikon

    I have never solved the Rubik's Cube puzzle, but I really like the analogy with regard to the Fenn poem.

    When you first encounter a Rubik's Cube you don't know how it will have been left. The colors may appear randomly located, but you know that it is possible, with enough repositioning (assuming it hasn't been tampered with), to align the colors correctly. Every person who picks up the cube will likely make different moves to achieve the same goal, and depending on the state of the cube at the start, the sequence of moves could be radically different.

    Now apply the analogy to the poem. Since there is no definitive starting point discernible, you have to make certain assumptions, which are then tested in the real world. For a host of different reasons some searchers might choose to begin at, say, Ojo Caliente, and others at the confluence of the Firehole and Gibbon. At first glance logic dictates that, even if one of those is correct, they can't both be right, and of course they would yield radically different next step solutions. But is that really what we're dealing with: right versus wrong? Going back to the Rubik's Cube, suppose that you've been incredibly lucky and aligned one whole face with a unified color within a couple of moves. You begin to congratulate yourself, only to turn the object over and find that all the other faces are hopelessly misaligned. What do you do? Do you try to reconfigure the original starting state, delude yourself that your one "solved" face is the end, or carry on working? I suspect you carry on working, gradually recognizing the importance of core positions, and moving slowly, but increasingly methodically, toward the final, full alignment. And by doing that you discover that there's no correct or incorrect starting state; you just take the cube as you find it and work from there.

    YMMV

  • #2
    Perhaps an alternate meaning IMO;

    Someone understands and has solved the Poem, they have the answers to end the Chase within their hands, only a few final twists to go.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Poe2 View Post
      Perhaps an alternate meaning IMO;

      Someone understands and has solved the Poem, they have the answers to end the Chase within their hands, only a few final twists to go.
      The twist in the tail!

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      • #4
        Originally posted by voxpops View Post
        The twist in the tail!
        Some days...
        "I once sent a dozen of my friends a telegram saying 'flee at once - all is discovered.' They all left town immediately." ~ Mark Twain

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Poe2 View Post
          Perhaps an alternate meaning IMO;

          Someone understands and has solved the Poem, they have the answers to end the Chase within their hands, only a few final twists to go.
          Agree.

          Peace,

          Orion

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          • #6
            Originally posted by voxpops View Post

            The twist in the tail!
            Twist And Shout !
            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZKt6XbyJ8VU

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            • #7
              Originally posted by voxpops View Post
              I have never solved the Rubik's Cube puzzle, but I really like the analogy with regard to the Fenn poem.

              When you first encounter a Rubik's Cube you don't know how it will have been left. The colors may appear randomly located, but you know that it is possible, with enough repositioning (assuming it hasn't been tampered with), to align the colors correctly. Every person who picks up the cube will likely make different moves to achieve the same goal, and depending on the state of the cube at the start, the sequence of moves could be radically different.

              Now apply the analogy to the poem. Since there is no definitive starting point discernible, you have to make certain assumptions, which are then tested in the real world. For a host of different reasons some searchers might choose to begin at, say, Ojo Caliente, and others at the confluence of the Firehole and Gibbon. At first glance logic dictates that, even if one of those is correct, they can't both be right, and of course they would yield radically different next step solutions. But is that really what we're dealing with: right versus wrong? Going back to the Rubik's Cube, suppose that you've been incredibly lucky and aligned one whole face with a unified color within a couple of moves. You begin to congratulate yourself, only to turn the object over and find that all the other faces are hopelessly misaligned. What do you do? Do you try to reconfigure the original starting state, delude yourself that your one "solved" face is the end, or carry on working? I suspect you carry on working, gradually recognizing the importance of core positions, and moving slowly, but increasingly methodically, toward the final, full alignment. And by doing that you discover that there's no correct or incorrect starting state; you just take the cube as you find it and work from there.

              YMMV
              The Rubik's cube is a combination puzzle. You can't solve one side without involving all of the other sides.
              No given side can be solved in isolation from all the other sides.
              It takes the whole cube to solve each subsequent side.

              Everything needed to solve the cube, is within the cube itself.
              Last edited by ROLL TIDE; 05-14-2019, 05:01 PM.
              Daniel Castro (Blues)
              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PNCrfKtA3lE

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              • #8
                It may look like it will not come together, even with the last few moves. However, with the final twist its complete. https://youtu.be/2TigHAH3oKA
                "If you think it could not have been put there, your probably right. f " https://youtu.be/St6jyEFe5WM

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