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  • Will-o'-the-wisp

    Making a new thread so i can expand rather than dipping in and out of RT's thread.

    Will-o'-the-wisp

    In folklore, a will-o'-the-wisp, will-o'-wisp or ignis fatuus (pronounced [ˈfa.tu.us]; Medieval Latin for "fool's fire") is an atmospheric ghost lightseen by travelers at night, especially over bogs, swamps or marshes.

    In literature, will-o'-the-wisp sometimes have a metaphorical meaning, e.g. describing a hope or goal that leads one on but is impossible to reach.
    Americas -folklore explains will-o-the-wisp to be witches who transformed into these lights. The reason for this, however, varies according to the region. Another explanation refers to the lights as indicators to places where gold or hidden treasures are buried which can be found only with the help of children

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Will-o%27-the-wisp

    will-o'-wisp or ignis fatuus (pronounced [ˈfa.tu.us]; Medieval Latin for "fool's fire")

    Well, the first night we couldn’t get the dumb fire started, and we had already used most of our matches, so we very wisely wadded the map and hoped that we would be forgiven that one small foible.
    wisp
    /wɪsp/
    noun: a small thin or twisted bunch, piece, or amount of something.

    Wise and found the blaze.

    Warren Angus Ferris - Try the wheel
    "Life in the rocky Mountains"

    A Diary of Wanderings on the Sources of the Rivers Missouri, Columbia, and Colorado from February, 1830, to November, 1835
    https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=...ntains&f=false
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    Last of our provisions, hoped to kill something soon, Wisdom River, warm springy, scantily, sage, wet blanket for lodging, phantom, ignis fatuus, collected our horses who had broken loose from their pickets.

    Well, the first night we couldn’t get the dumb fire started, and we had already used most of our matches, so we very wisely wadded the map and hoped that we would be forgiven that one small foible. It worked and as the fire crackled and our horses wandered off, we ate our three candy bars and talked long into the night. Osborne Russell had been in those mountains for nine years and suddenly we felt like we were with him.

    We spent the next day looking for the horses and finally found them down by a rivulet where the grass was tall and abundant. There were no fish around anywhere and prudence whispered that we should not shoot the two magpies we saw. Later we realized the folly of that decision.

    The next day we rode the mountains, the hills, the valleys, the hollows, the dales and the depressions, looking for something to catch or shoot.
    There’s nothing worse than a wet bedroll on a cold night.
    https://www.oldsantafetradingco.com/...l-of-the-chase
    Last edited by BiggishShoes; 05-05-2019, 03:24 AM.
    In the UK homeless people can sell a magazine called 'The Big Issue'

    Sharing is caring. Thanks for all the fish. It's been RAD.

  • #2
    I'm impressed he always provides
    Last edited by Wraith14u; 05-05-2019, 02:15 AM.
    "If you think it could not have been put there, your probably right. f " https://www.hintofriches.com/core/sm...ilies/cool.pnghttps://youtu.be/St6jyEFe5WM

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    • #3
      Arriving at a major confluence, Lewis and Clark named the western fork the Wisdom River, the eastern fork the Philanthropy River and retained the middle fork as a continuation of the Jefferson River. However, none of these names were retained. These rivers are known today as the Big Hole, the Ruby, and the Beaverhead.[12]
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jefferson_River

      philanthropy
      /fɪˈlanθrəpi/
      noun
      1. the desire to promote the welfare of others, expressed especially by the generous donation of money to good causes.
      In the UK homeless people can sell a magazine called 'The Big Issue'

      Sharing is caring. Thanks for all the fish. It's been RAD.

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      • #4
        The first recorded mention of a will-o'-the-wisp sighting appeared in 1340 when Dafydd ap Gwilym (translated by W. Sykes) noted

        ‘There was in every hollow a hundred wrymouthed wisps’

        He referred to the phenomenon in Welsh as canwyll corff, literally corpse-candle, so formulating the mysterious association between the wisps and burial places.
        https://royalsocietypublishing.org/d...rsta.2014.0206

        Combustion: many accounts refer to the will-o'-the-wisp as a flame, but it is clearly not an ordinary combustion flame. In only one case recorded does the observer report the successful ignition of combustible material from a will-o'-the-wisp.
        Well, the first night we couldn’t get the dumb fire started, and we had already used most of our matches, so we very wisely wadded the map and hoped that we would be forgiven that one small foible.
        Was Donnie and FF trying to get a light from the 'fools fire'?
        Last edited by BiggishShoes; 05-05-2019, 03:33 AM.
        In the UK homeless people can sell a magazine called 'The Big Issue'

        Sharing is caring. Thanks for all the fish. It's been RAD.

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        • #5
          Seems I read something about the Big Hole Black-feet made camp by, and I'm sure the fire was appreciated.
          "If you think it could not have been put there, your probably right. f " https://www.hintofriches.com/core/sm...ilies/cool.pnghttps://youtu.be/St6jyEFe5WM

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          • #6
            This is what i envisage (visage - face - map)

            The treasure is located in marsh land (fenn land) surrounded by a will o' the wisp, which is only visible at night (take a torch). You have to look quickly into the will o' the wisp using your face to locate the chest. Will o' the wisps flames are not hot, so your effort will be worth the cold.

            Think i will leave it there for now before i leave the planet. Have a good day all.


            What Causes 'Wil-o-the-Wisps"?

            https://youtu.be/GTxiyzWTUTg
            https://youtu.be/L1_Sllf5eQk
            Last edited by BiggishShoes; 05-05-2019, 04:12 AM.
            In the UK homeless people can sell a magazine called 'The Big Issue'

            Sharing is caring. Thanks for all the fish. It's been RAD.

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            • #7
              I wouldn't be in any hurry Biggish to look at that will o' wisp, we have much to learn (treasure) about Mr. Fenn.
              "If you think it could not have been put there, your probably right. f " https://www.hintofriches.com/core/sm...ilies/cool.pnghttps://youtu.be/St6jyEFe5WM

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              • #8
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                • #9
                  Biggish, I thought you might appreciate this one, in the Brecon Beacons:
                  https://www.atoptics.co.uk/fz1083.htm

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                  • #10
                    i remember as a kid about 4, a swamp gas incident with my mother on a dark night in the country on the old farm. it was a green fog coming from the swamp out back rolling towards the house. she absolutely freaked out. at that age i didn't understand, but as i got older it sure has been a good source for a lot of family laughs. lol she absolutely hated it way out in nowhere. i will add at that young age i was quite the snake wrangler, it was a fun little hobby that she could never fully appreciate. lol

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                    • #11
                      Joan The Wad(ded)

                      Wad is an Eastern Cornwall colloquial term for torch or bundle of straw.[1][2][3]Folklore

                      Joan the Wad has been associated with Jack o' the Lantern, the King of the Piskeys.[1] The two may also be considered will-o'-the-wisp type characters who lead travelers astray on lonely moors, hence the rhyme:[2][4][5]
                      Jack-the-lantern, Joan-the-wad,
                      That tickled the maid and made her mad,
                      Light me home, the weather's bad.[2][5]
                      However, Joan is also to thought use her Wad (Torch) to light the way to safety and good luck, as another rhyme says, "Good fortune will nod, if you carry upon you Joan the Wad".[1][5]Iconography

                      Joan the Wad is often depicted naked and associated with fire and water elements.[1] In the last century, there was a thriving cottage industry in Joan the Wad lucky charms.[1] People carried small figures of Joan the Wad for good luck: a small collection of such antique figures is housed at the Museum of Witchcraft in Boscastle.[6] Her image also appears on door knockers to serve as a protective spirit.


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                      In the UK homeless people can sell a magazine called 'The Big Issue'

                      Sharing is caring. Thanks for all the fish. It's been RAD.

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                      • #12
                        Will o' the Wisp - Dr Jackson Arvad is a brilliant scientist, especially in the field of electromagnetics, with a Masters of Science degree in electrical engineering.

                        Will O' The Wisp can mesmerize people into performing certain simple acts. To do so, he disperses molecules from the vicinity of his chest emblem, causing it to glow brightly. For reasons not fully revealed, gazing into this light puts the looker into a highly suggestible hypnotic trance, susceptible to the Wisp's commands. This hypnotic state generally lasts ten to thirty minutes, depending upon the subject's mental state and the length of exposure to the light.

                        Marvel Gaze

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                        http://www.marveldirectory.com/indiv...llothewisp.htm
                        In the UK homeless people can sell a magazine called 'The Big Issue'

                        Sharing is caring. Thanks for all the fish. It's been RAD.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by rapala67 View Post
                          i remember as a kid about 4, a swamp gas incident with my mother on a dark night in the country on the old farm. it was a green fog coming from the swamp out back rolling towards the house. she absolutely freaked out. at that age i didn't understand, but as i got older it sure has been a good source for a lot of family laughs. lol she absolutely hated it way out in nowhere. i will add at that young age i was quite the snake wrangler, it was a fun little hobby that she could never fully appreciate. lol
                          LOL, I used to catch snakes too. One time I had a large bucket full, with dirt and a screen lid. I didn't notice the whole in the bottom. The next day after school I came home and women and girls all around the neighborhood would scream every few minutes, and I'd run over and round up one of my escapees.
                          Boy was that funny. And I delayed doing my homework, too. Can't beat that deal.
                          AKA: Buckeye Bob

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                          • #14
                            https://www.ufoinsight.com/michigan-...gas-incidents/

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                            • #15
                              Putting this here for now, jack o lantern, The rise of Chase’s Jack, Jack in household fairytales and how they found their way from england, ireland,wales,scotland and europe into the American way of life.

                              http://www.folkstreams.net/film-context.php?id=258

                              Big on Jack at the mo

                              The rhyme
                              Fy, fa and fum,
                              I smell the bloud of an Englishman

                              --now so closely associated with tales of Jack and the giants—appears in Thomas Nashe’s Haue with You to Saffron-Walden (1596) and a little later, with variations, in Shakespeare’s King Lear (ca. 1605). When Nashe wrote, the rhyme was already old, for he warns that only a pedant would search for “the first inuention” of “Fy, fa and fum.”
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                              Last edited by BiggishShoes; 05-09-2019, 12:09 PM.
                              In the UK homeless people can sell a magazine called 'The Big Issue'

                              Sharing is caring. Thanks for all the fish. It's been RAD.

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