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Did Fenn follow his own clues

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  • Did Fenn follow his own clues

    Did Fenn travel the route that the poem lays out to the hiding place? Or did Fenn himself always have a different route he used to the hiding place?

  • #2
    I also wonder if he didn't reverse engineer the hiding place by looking for things he could put into the poem as he made his way back to where ever he started from, like his home or wherever?

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    • #3
      Metalman

      Here are a couple of mentions from Forrest that may help:

      * To answer some questions and save others from being asked, I did follow the clues in the poem when I hid the treasure chest, although I hid it before the poem was complete. (Completed?) f (posted 6/5/2107)

      *I could have written the poem before I hid the treasure chest, but I didn’t. f (weekly word from October 14th, 2016)

      http://mysteriouswritings.com/featur...-direct-route/

      Dear Mr. Fenn, Once you hid the treasure, did you take the exact same route in reverse to return to your car?”

      Thank you. ~ Tyler Y.

      Yes I did Tyler, it was the most direct route. f
      Last edited by Seannm; 02-11-2019, 08:54 PM.

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      • #4
        "My question is… when the treasure was hidden, did you follow the clues just like they are mentioned in the poem or did you just go to where you wanted to hide it, knowing that the poem would lead someone there? Does that make sense? ~Tim"

        Tim,
        I knew from the beginning where to hide the treasure. It wasn’t until later that the clues were provided to find that spot. I don’t know “…that the poem will lead someone there,” as you asked, but the poem does provide everyone with that opportunity. f


        So the first answer seems to be that he didn't follow the clues because he knew how to get there without them.

        To answer some questions and save others from being asked, I did follow the clues in the poem when I hid the treasure chest, although I hid it before the poem was complete. (Completed?) f

        So the second answer seems to be that he did follow the clues, even though the poem wasn't complete.

        I think its all a matter of perspective, (imo).

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        • #5
          Thank you for providing those answers as vague as they are. The clues need to lead us to where he parked his car. And then where to go after he started walking. Seems simple enough. Lol

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          • #6
            If you want to make things more complicated, remember that Forrest wrote that "it is not likely that anyone will find it [the chest] without following the clues, at least in their mind."

            So when Forrest "follow[ed] the clues in the [not-yet-completed] poem when [he] . . . hid the treasure chest," did he do so literally, or just in his mind?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Seannm View Post
              Metalman

              Here are a couple of mentions from Forrest that may help:

              * To answer some questions and save others from being asked, I did follow the clues in the poem when I hid the treasure chest, although I hid it before the poem was complete. (Completed?) f (posted 6/5/2107)

              *I could have written the poem before I hid the treasure chest, but I didn’t. f (weekly word from October 14th, 2016)

              http://mysteriouswritings.com/featur...-direct-route/

              Dear Mr. Fenn, Once you hid the treasure, did you take the exact same route in reverse to return to your car?”

              Thank you. ~ Tyler Y.

              Yes I did Tyler, it was the most direct route. f
              The Tyler question doesn’t answer anything. Tyler doesn’t ask if he followed the clues in order. What if he hid the treasure without following all 9 clues?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Must Listengood View Post
                To answer some questions and save others from being asked, I did follow the clues in the poem when I hid the treasure chest, although I hid it before the poem was complete. (Completed?) f

                So the second answer seems to be that he did follow the clues, even though the poem wasn't complete.

                I think its all a matter of perspective, (imo).
                Allow me to alter the perspective a little by reordering the sentence:

                I did follow the clues in the poem when I hid the treasure chest, to answer some questions...

                It may well have been Fenn himself that had questions to which he needed answers. The poem may not have been completed yet, but he was still able to follow the clues in his mind as he tried to formulate these questions and listen for the answers. The result? Fatigue and a weak "I" - and presumably some answers which only confirmed what he already knew, deep in his heart.

                But what about the remaining phrase: ...and save others from being asked...? This might imply that by asking the right questions back then, other even more searching questions would not need to be asked of him at a later date. Or, alternatively, would it be totally out of order to insert a potentially implied word here: ...and save other[s] people from being asked...? That by asking these important questions, he would somehow be saving some other people from that onerous task. IMO, either interpretation would work, but the latter implies that the Chase is far from a stroll in the (National) park.

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                • #9
                  I believe that some of the reference points used in the poem could be points along the way that he never traveled to or through to get to the hiding place. I do not think he began his voyage at wwwh. The searcher doesn't even start there only in his mind or on Google earth. This is what makes this so hard. We need to figure out which clue leads us to where he parked his car.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Metalman View Post
                    I believe that some of the reference points used in the poem could be points along the way that he never traveled to or through to get to the hiding place. I do not think he began his voyage at wwwh. The searcher doesn't even start there only in his mind or on Google earth. This is what makes this so hard. We need to figure out which clue leads us to where he parked his car.
                    That is an interesting point. I’ve always been under the assumption that he parked his car at WWWH....but maybe he didn’t. I’ve entertained the idea that we either need to find the scraps of bullet or a downed airplane extremely well hidden.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Copper View Post

                      That is an interesting point. I’ve always been under the assumption that he parked his car at WWWH....but maybe he didn’t. I’ve entertained the idea that we either need to find the scraps of bullet or a downed airplane extremely well hidden.
                      Scraps of bullet not sure what that term means other then ammunition? Or is it a style or shape of aluminum? I figure it says to far to walk from the wwwh so he is not parked there. I also wonder if his wwwh is a place that is in his line of sight from where he does park, but he was never actually there. So from the clues, you just draw a line on a map from point a to b and b is where he parks. It could be a mountain peak that has plane wreckage on it or something like that. Then you follow the canyon down visually to where you are in your vehicle. But you never actually was at point a.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by lingerlonger
                        Hmmm, looking for a black box(orange in color) amongst the remnants of an airplane boneyard. That is very interesting, but I always thought we were looking for the end of the road to Rainbow Town. The reason the King of Saxony's giant head wires are no longer functioning is due to the Archbold's bowerbird. Theoretically, the other end of the key has to be where the chest is located. For the clues to be in order and connected contiguously they would have to be 1+23-4+5+6+78-9 or 123-45-67+89, etc. or perhaps A-I with h and i being too far to walk. Idk why I feel so dumb telling you I feel dumb for telling you.
                        It doesn't really matter which way it gets you to rainbow town you just got to get there. In fact once there I am sure you could see other ways to get there. I personally am not looking for an orange black box but if it is out there somebody will find it.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Metalman View Post

                          Scraps of bullet not sure what that term means other then ammunition? Or is it a style or shape of aluminum? I figure it says to far to walk from the wwwh so he is not parked there. I also wonder if his wwwh is a place that is in his line of sight from where he does park, but he was never actually there. So from the clues, you just draw a line on a map from point a to b and b is where he parks. It could be a mountain peak that has plane wreckage on it or something like that. Then you follow the canyon down visually to where you are in your vehicle. But you never actually was at point a.
                          Scraps of bullet is his car.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Copper View Post

                            That is an interesting point. I’ve always been under the assumption that he parked his car at WWWH....but maybe he didn’t. I’ve entertained the idea that we either need to find the scraps of bullet or a downed airplane extremely well hidden.
                            When you find his car, you're where you'll need to figure out the last clue.

                            The final clue, he said, would be where they found his car: in the parking lot..." (Preston Douglas, forward Once Upon a While, recounting what Fenn said to him).

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                            • #15
                              I did not know scraps of bullets was his car. Is that something learned in one of his books? I did not learn of the poem until early Nov. 2018 . This is always the time of year where you have the Holidays and cold snowy weather. Winter always makes for a slow down in business, then throw in income taxes, it is a time for tightening up the belt and that means I have not purchased any of the books yet. But I can't wait for the time to feel right to buy them. In fact if there is anyone who is ready to part with either of the first 2 books I might be a buyer. Thanks

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