Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Spaghetti

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Spaghetti

    This will be my go to thread for my own random, crazy, off the wall thoughts (hope you dont mind @rolltide, it seems to work well for you so I thought I'd try it).
    Any and all, feel free to ignore it, or not...comment or not.


  • #2
    MESS

    When it first appeared in English, mess meant a portion of food. This came from the Old French mes, “a dish”, which in modern French is spelt mets. This comes ultimately from the Latin missus, strictly “to put, send” but which could also mean “a course at a meal” (that is, something put on the table).

    In the fifteenth century, mess came to refer to a group of people, usually four in number, who sat together at a meal and were served from the same dishes. This soon evolved into a name of any group that ate together. For example, in warships, a group of a dozen or so men would usually sit together at one table and were served from the same dishes; this was one mess, and those who habitually sat together were messmates; the room was often called a mess-room, a space that contained a set of messes. By an obvious process, mess-room was itself later contracted to mess, so confusing the place where one ate with the groups of people one ate with.

    At one time mess could also refer to any cooked dish, especially one which was liquid or pulpy; this is best remembered in the mess of pottage for which Esau sold his birthright in the Bible (though the phrase doesn’t appear in the Authorised Version of 1611). The sense of a confused jumble or a dirty or untidy state, which is the first association we have for messnowadays, evolved from this meaning and seems to have been a disparaging reference to such sloppy food. It is actually a very recent usage, dating only from the nineteenth century (it’s first recorded in Webster’s Dictionary in 1828)

    Comment


    • #3
      *Note the archaic definition(s)

      as1
      adverb: as
      1. 1.
        used in comparisons to refer to the extent or degree of something.
        • used to emphasize an amount.
      conjunction: as
      1. used to indicate that something happens during the time when something is taking place.
      2. used to add or interject a comment relating to the statement of a fact
      3. used to indicate by comparison the way that something happens or is done.
      4. because; since.
      5. even though.
      preposition: as
      1. used to refer to the function or character that someone or something has.
      2. during the time of being (the thing specified).

      Origin

      Middle English: reduced form of Old English alswā ‘similarly’ (see also).

      noun: as; plural noun: asses
      1. an ancient Roman copper coin.

      Origin

      Latin, literally ‘a unit.’

      prefix: as-
      1. variant spelling of ad- assimilated before s(as in assemble, assess ).
      symbol: As
      1. the chemical element arsenic.


      Comment


      • #4
        Don't mind at all, jdiggins.
        Mess is an excellent word to start with.
        https://mysteriouswritings.com/featu...e-hunt-catsup/

        https://www.classicthesaurus.com/mess
        If a person will Think, they can find the chest.
        But the secret is to think, and analyze … they can find the chest. ff

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by ROLL TIDE View Post
          Don't mind at all, jdiggins.
          Mess is an excellent word to start with.
          https://mysteriouswritings.com/featu...e-hunt-catsup/

          https://www.classicthesaurus.com/mess
          Thank you kindly. Always appreciate your input!

          Comment


          • #6
            And the poem..
            Many times the four corner letters have been mentioned to read idea counter clockwise starting with the last line in the poem. If you start with the first line, they spell aide.
            IF you take the four corner letters and think four corners, now you are at a popular tourist location, which has two of the search states.

            food... or should I say, mess for thought.

            Comment


            • #7
              The USMC called the place to eat a Mess Hall,
              or at least my father did, 22 years in the Corp.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by jdiggins View Post
                And the poem..
                Many times the four corner letters have been mentioned to read idea counter clockwise starting with the last line in the poem. If you start with the first line, they spell aide.
                IF you take the four corner letters and think four corners, now you are at a popular tourist location, which has two of the search states.

                food... or should I say, mess for thought.
                I may be making myself a thread to keep notes!

                The corners of the poem are also IDEA

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by 1Trailblazer View Post
                  The USMC called the place to eat a Mess Hall,
                  or at least my father did, 22 years in the Corp.
                  Or the mess tent...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    If I kept a record, I’d hate myself. I only look back to apologize occasionally.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by RahRah View Post

                      I may be making myself a thread to keep notes!

                      The corners of the poem are also IDEA
                      Yes, Take the IDEA, the four corners, to AIDE you...bam! Two states out of play.
                      just ONE way to look at it.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        The Hall was right of the NCO club, tents left... lol

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by OH-OH!
                          Mess:
                          My brother wrote Forrest Fenn about "don't mess with my poem" and he got a response back. Forrest stated that "don't mess with my poem" Is in the same context as "don't mess with Texas". "Don't mess with Texas" is the slogan to keep the state clean. "DON'T MESS WITH TEXAS, CLEAN IT UP" So if you apply that theory to Mr. Fenn's "don't mess with my poem" statement, he is telling us to clean up his poem.........................................
                          Until a couple of years ago I used to go to Texas on a regular basis for business. I do remember "Don't mess with Texas" anti-littering signs, but I never saw one that said, "Clean it up." as well. So at least from Dallas to Austin to San Antonio to Amarillo and back to Dallas, the only signs I saw were like the image attached.

                          Click image for larger version  Name:	texas.jpg Views:	1 Size:	14.2 KB ID:	63271
                          Last edited by WanderingLost; 10-25-2018, 12:30 AM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            If your looking for a box with cash
                            Don’t leave your trash.

                            Don’t trash Wyoming.
                            A message from the National Broadcast System.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I wonder if Fenn's statement regarding messing with the poem straightforward? Spaghetti sounds good, I think I'll whip a mess of it for supper.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X