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  • #61
    Originally posted by mountain digger

    It could. Which is why I added the thought 'probably'. But, will beginning with an assumption [hypothesis] lead you with confidence? It wouldn't me.

    Edit to add:
    • 5Q) From receiving feedback on hunter’s ideas and methods about how to discover the location of the chest, do you feel confident your method in hiding the chest will eventually be understood and the chest be found? Please know, I am not asking for any specifics. My question is more like, do you still feel your poem will lead someone to the treasure?

    The person who finds the treasure will have studied the poem over and over, and thought, and analyzed and moved with confidence. Nothing about it will be accidental. T. S. Eliot said:

    We shall not cease from our exploration
    And at the end of all our exploring
    Will be to arrive where we started
    And know the place for the first time
    CONFIDENCE - oh I love that word.
    It's what drives us all.
    It's what makes us tick.
    It's what Forrest did by creating his Thrill of the Chase - he inspired us.
    Now take a deep breath and breathe.....

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    • #62
      Thot I would post this as a reminder.
      It was not in the poem or book (I'm bad) but rather an excerpt from Margie Goldsmith's article quoting Forrest.

      “What serious adventurers should remember,” Fenn says, “is to not believe anything that is not in my poem or otherwise in my book. There’s some misinformation out there. For instance, I never said I buried the chest, I said only that I hid it. That is not to say it is not buried, so maybe we need to define the terms. Does ‘hidden’ mean in plain sight? What is the difference between ‘buried,’ ‘entombed,’ and ‘sepultured’? What does the word ‘blaze’ in the poem mean? A horse can have a blaze on its forehead, a blaze can be scraped on a tree to mark one’s way, a blaze can mean a flame or a scar on a rock. And what about ‘water high’? Does it mean deep, or higher than normal?”

      (And yes - the word "sepultured" is spelled as such in the article.

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      • #63
        Originally posted by Mr hand View Post

        which is in the mountains north of somedangplace
        I believe it is "in the mountains north of Santa Fe."

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        • #64
          So we are in COLORADO somewhere.
          Let's move on down in the poem and look not for WWWsH but for the home of Brown.
          Our goal is to narrow down the search area.
          I have three Brown's that I am considering.
          How about y'all?

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          • #65
            Brown's Canyon is likely one of your three. On the Arkansas River if my memory is correct. Collegiate Peaks nearby (if you've been wise), but otherwise I didn't find a lot to like about this area. Obviously other searchers liked this area, including one who unfortunately drowned.

            Of the spots in Colorado, the only area that I thought had any chance at all was near Ouray (ice-climbing: WWWH). But it's not remotely in the same league as Gallatin Canyon in Montana as far as aligning with the poem.

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            • #66
              Originally posted by wwwamericana View Post
              So we are in COLORADO somewhere.
              Let's move on down in the poem and look not for WWWsH but for the home of Brown.
              Our goal is to narrow down the search area.
              I have three Brown's that I am considering.
              How about y'all?
              Forrest said that you should start WWWH. In Colorado this could be Steamboat Springs. And that small city is on his map. And what’s more they have a fantastic home of Brown there. It is a bridge called “James Brown Soul Center of the Universe”. That must be the most universal Home of Brown, that can be imagined. And it once was part of my very first solution of the poem.

              Last edited by jan_v60; 01-12-2023, 06:46 PM.

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              • #67
                Yep, Zap.
                Brown's Canyon is one of my three.

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                • #68
                  Originally posted by jan_v60 View Post
                  Forrest said that you should start WWWH. In Colorado this could be Steamboat Springs. And that small city is on his map.
                  But - he said IN THE POEM that WWWH is too far to walk to and that we should put in below the HOB......

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                  • #69
                    Click image for larger version

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Size:	3.92 MB
ID:	484878 This poem

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                    • #70
                      Originally posted by wwwamericana View Post

                      But - he said IN THE POEM that WWWH is too far to walk to and that we should put in below the HOB......
                      No, he did not say that WWWH was too far to walk. He said that it was too far to walk from WWWH towards the canyon down.

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                      • #71
                        Since Brown is capitalized, it is a proper noun. One option is that the home of Brown refers to Margaret Brown or "unsinkable" Molly Brown." She had a house in Denver. She also lived in Leadville for a time.
                        Last edited by elperro; 01-12-2023, 07:07 PM.

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                        • #72
                          Originally posted by jan_v60 View Post

                          No, he did not say that WWWH was too far to walk. He said that it was too far to walk from WWWH towards the canyon down.
                          You are right - the canyon WWWsH is too far to walk (to).

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                          • #73
                            Originally posted by elperro View Post
                            Since Brown is capitalized, it is a proper noun. One option is that the home of Brown refers to Margaret Brown or "unsinkable" Molly Brown." She had a house in Denver. She also lived in Leadville for a time.
                            Capital, my Friend! You nailed # 2.

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                            • #74
                              wwwamericana

                              I am just trying to play your game. You made the Colorado choice. My first solution was also Colorado. And Steamboat Springs. This is certainly a place WWWH (bathing in hot water facilities), and the name of the city because the hot springs made the noise of a steam engine. And even more important: the great fighter pilot Robin Olds lived there after his retirement and organised yearly meetings there with other fighter pilots he was friends with. More to come. I follow your sheme and instructions, with my Steamboat logic
                              Last edited by jan_v60; 01-12-2023, 07:31 PM.

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                              • #75
                                Originally posted by elperro View Post
                                Since Brown is capitalized, it is a proper noun. One option is that the home of Brown refers to Margaret Brown or "unsinkable" Molly Brown." She had a house in Denver. She also lived in Leadville for a time.
                                Yes, that Molly Brown museum in Denver brought me to Steamboat Springs also…the Titanic was a steamboat, and Molly survived the Titanic disaster..

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