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  • #16
    Originally posted by wwwamericana View Post
    Whoa........slow down, Partner. Don't think we are ready to get wet yet LOL. Concentrate on the first stanza, first sentence.
    Montana? Wyoming? Colorado? or New Mexico?
    That’s a little tricky, Forrest did say that the first key is figuring out WWWH. That said, the first stanza could refer to a place with bold treasures new and old. But truth be told, we were making more progress with yes or know answers IMO. I do think this thread is productive though

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    • #17
      Originally posted by lowkey View Post

      That’s a little tricky, Forrest did say that the first key is figuring out WWWH. That said, the first stanza could refer to a place with bold treasures new and old. But truth be told, we were making more progress with yes or know answers IMO. I do think this thread is productive though
      Yes and No answers are either black or white. So boring! Let's think in color.
      I can see you head turning in circles, lowkey.

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      • #18
        Hey True - thyme to holler "rainbow."

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        • #19
          Originally posted by wwwamericana View Post

          Yes and No answers are either black or white. So boring! Let's think in color.
          I can see you head turning in circles, lowkey.
          I love the yes or no because you’re digging into facts that can’t be disputed. Like Joe Friday, just the facts


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          • #20
            Remember y'all - this is an openbook test.....

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            • #21
              Hello - anyway out there?
              ​​​​​​Guess it's lights out for me.
              Till tommorow.
              www

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              • #22
                Originally posted by wwwamericana View Post
                1. We have been told by FF that the "treasure" - was secreted in the Rocky Mountains, in one of the four states: Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, or New Mexico.
                True or False?
                We know Montana's the "treasure" state.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by wwwamericana View Post
                  1. We have been told by FF that the "treasure" - was secreted in the Rocky Mountains, in one of the four states: Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, or New Mexico.
                  True or False?
                  True as far as only the highlighted parts on his map in (TFTW) are concerned:


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                  • #24
                    Good Morning!
                    Oh what a beautiful day it is - crisp, cold, and the sun is shining.
                    Never know what Mother Nature is gonna throw at ya but today she must be in a good mood.
                    Moods change rapidly so I guess one needs to be prepared.

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                    • #25
                      So getting back to the task at hand - determining the state where the poem and book leads us, let's get to work.
                      There was one comment about Wyoming and one mentioning Montana but Colorado is where I would like to start (ready El P?).

                      So let's assume it is Colorado - are there any hints in the book and/or poem that would support this assumption?
                      1. El P commented that Forrest never mentioned Colorado - good point. He "passed" often and he stated that it was important that no one knew of his secret location.
                      2. I'm gonna mention that Forrest thot it wise to take out color ads to promote his business ventures. A "color ad" - now that's rather interesting and rad.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by wwwamericana View Post
                        Good Morning!
                        Oh what a beautiful day it is - crisp, cold, and the sun is shining.
                        Never know what Mother Nature is gonna throw at ya but today she must be in a good mood.
                        Moods change rapidly so I guess one needs to be prepared.
                        Almost 50 degrees at 9 am here and I would say I wish it was spring,
                        But when I worked with my father and would say, I wish this day was over, he would say you are wishing your life away. It is TTOTC even if you are chasing that paycheck.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by elperro View Post

                          Hey,
                          IMO, FF's use of "treasure," "treasure chest," and "trove" may make one's understanding of what FF said, different than what he actually meant. I'll concede, that yes, your statement is true, he talked a lot about secreting the "treasure" in the Rocky Mountains in one of the 4 states you listed. I think that's what you're getting at. I'd add the caveat that he talks at length about acquiring and hiding the chest in the Rocky Mountains*. Is "treasure" what he meant by the "treasure chest?" I'm not sure.

                          *Gold and More, TTOTC.

                          Please, go on.
                          Forrest wrote, “So I wrote a poem containing nine clues that if followed precisely, will lead to the end of my rainbow and the treasure:”

                          Broken down into objects: Poem, 9 clues, precision-lead, rainbow, and the treasure.
                          These things are the objects of the sentence. Individually they equate to symbols, for words are things of sentences.

                          It is unwise to discount the symbolism of these objects, or “symbols” when considering the sentence was written by someone with a reputation as “Mandrake Fenn.” Mandrake the Magician is a magician. Eric Sloan’s caricature of Forrest as “Mandrake the Magician,” is telling about the character of the man as a wizard of wordsmithing; a trickster, the joker, and a kochari incarnate.

                          Consider the portion of the sentence, “will lead to the end of my rainbow and the treasure” as a “magic potion” of the wizard. Look at the words, “rainbow” and “treasure.” Now consider these two words as symbols. Now consider “rainbow” as a transformative symbol. Mathematical transformations allow equivalent values for symbols (numbers), and so does language and words: The circular arch=the semicircle=the half-disk= the shape of a rainbow=the shape of an omega. Don’t forget to include reflection symmetry when considering the rainbow as a symbol.

                          The shape of omega is a rainbow. The shape of a double omega is the shape of a double rainbow. The double rainbow is the shape of the uu or the UU, which have direct lineage into the W(Wynn). The W is the M in the realm of “reflection symmetry.” Why does all this matter? Well, the symbol that Forrest uses is “rainbow,” but it means all these other things too.

                          Regarding logic and the word “treasure,” the same as above applies: the word “treasure” is a symbol that has a homophone equivalent to the word “tressure.” Orle (heraldry) distinguishes the word “tressure” as the following (from Wikipedia):

                          A tressure is a subordinary that can be regarded as a diminutive of an orle. John Woodward is of the opinion that “a plain tressure is a diminutive of the orle, and is depicted half its thickness.” A tressure is described as representing the circular raised line on a coin that shows the user if the coin has been clipped of overly worn.

                          All this to show that a word wizard can use the words “rainbow and treasure” to not mean “rainbow and treasure.” Sure, on the one hand, “rainbow and treasure” mean just what you think that they mean, but on the other hand, these words, or “symbols” have a transformative function. This double meaning of symbols (words, rainbow, and treasure) is in-line with the methodology of a Magician, the “Mandrake Fenn,” whose use of symbols (words) cannot be underestimated to mean just one thing. Such are riddles and the smoke and mirrors employed in the execution of magic tricks.

                          But what if treasure = tressure, and rainbow = W? Does that expose ““So I wrote a poem containing nine clues that if followed precisely, will lead to the end of my rainbow and the treasure:” to a wider logic that is more encompassing and in line with the method of the smoke and mirrors employed by the magician, aka…Mandrake Fenn?

                          Logic in riddles needs to include serious consideration of equivalent and transformative values for the symbols that are being employed by the wordsmith, otherwise, you might just have the wool pulled over your eyes. We are the riddle solvers. Cheers.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by wwwamericana View Post
                            So getting back to the task at hand - determining the state where the poem and book leads us, let's get to work.
                            There was one comment about Wyoming and one mentioning Montana but Colorado is where I would like to start (ready El P?).

                            So let's assume it is Colorado - are there any hints in the book and/or poem that would support this assumption?
                            1. El P commented that Forrest never mentioned Colorado - good point. He "passed" often and he stated that it was important that no one knew of his secret location.
                            2. I'm gonna mention that Forrest thot it wise to take out color ads to promote his business ventures. A "color ad" - now that's rather interesting and rad.
                            Color ad? OH! Now that is clever. I've never seen that mentioned. And the state is shaped like a (full) page.

                            Then there's this:
                            Click image for larger version  Name:	CBD89921-65C4-4875-BD76-ECD0D7253197.jpg Views:	0 Size:	3.49 MB ID:	484635
                            Last edited by elperro; 01-11-2023, 12:53 PM.

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                            • #29
                              My Spanish Toy Factory​:
                              Origin of Colorado--After the Colorado River, from Spanish colorado, colored, red, reddish, because of the reddish-brown color of its water.
                              He'd find a "good-looking rock" to make marbles. I'd assume that the best looking ones had nice colors.

                              Bessie and Me:
                              There was a famous Bessie from Routt Co, Colorado
                              https://steamboatlibrary.marmot.org/...n:11771/Person

                              Buffalo Cowboys:
                              "Buffalo Bill" William Frederick Cody died, and had his funeral in Denver. He's buried on Lookout Mountain, in Golden, CO.
                              Last edited by elperro; 01-11-2023, 01:19 PM.

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                              • #30
                                To be as simple as possible, to start as simple as possible, we were introduced to the Chase how? For me it was a news article forwarded by a friend that knows I like puzzles. Read the article, eventually ordered the book, but I don’t have it yet. I only have the poem (that didn’t come with the introduction- just the nameless poem), and all the maps on the internet including the highlighted one, and, since I started late (2018), all the videos of F and forums etc. I like to try my own way before getting distracted by everyone else’s ideas so I don’t read other solves.
                                I look at the poem, videos of F, and maps of the Rockies.
                                There is a prominent video where he states the first clue is ‘begin it where warm waters halt’. Warm waters, he states, are comfortable. I started there- where things were comfortable and then they were not. Some people have tried to keep personal bias out of this whole thing. I ran simultaneous parallel concepts- one, geographical, with common horse sense and information available to anyone. The other, personal, ‘private’, as if it were written to me and for me. Now I could explain the geographical one, how it logically led me to 12’ squared, and then BOTG much closer, but that’s not the beginning. For me, BOTH parallel concepts are required to work in tandem.
                                The horse sense geographically involves literal warm waters.
                                The tandem involves figurative ‘where/when comfortable stopped for me.’

                                Had my location in two days, well before my book arrived, and five years later it’s still the only one that makes sense- even after reading the books and supplements and forums and history books and chasing anomalies and listening to everyone else’s cryptic solves involving all of the (brilliant and entertaining) rabbit holes this gift keeps giving. I have yet to find Any piece of information that doesn’t make sense or conflicts, which isn’t supportive per se, just not contradictory.

                                What was my horse sense step number one? A Google search engine, of course.

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