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The Scissors and the Stick

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  • The Scissors and the Stick

    It is reasonable to think that the scissors in Forrest’s chest can be linked to his giant ball of string. It is reasonable that the stick in the chest has been the cause of some consternation among the searchers in this community. I offer something for consideration.....from an article I saw today.

    Below is a link to an MSN article by Aimee White that pictures 3 items known as “the Dixon Relics,” found in 1872 under the Khufu Pyramid, Giza.


    From the article: “For such a grand pyramid very few artifacts were discovered; just three items, in fact. Commonly referred to as 'the Dixon Relics', named after Waynman Dixon who found them in 1872, the items consist of a granite sphere, a forked copper instrument and a wooden slat. The forked instrument may once have included a bone or wooden handle and was likely used to manipulate rope, while the granite sphere worked as a pounder.”

    It is interesting that these 3-relics seem to share a similarity with the items in Forrest’s chest:
    The granite ball….Forrest’s ball of string (the scissors can infer the cutting of a string)
    The forked copper instrument is associated with rope….Forrest’s scissors with string
    The wooden slat….the wooden stick pictured in the chest

    Link to the article: https://www.msn.com/en-us/travel/tri...02517c#image=6
    ​Cheers
    Last edited by trueyeti; 12-03-2022, 05:16 AM.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Old Pilot
    Thank you for telling us what's interesting.
    Hey OP,
    A quote from Byron S. Harvey's 2005 obituary in the Chicago Tribune: "His children all shared his strong sense of connection to indigenous peoples," said his son, Stephen, an Egyptian archeologist at the University of Chicago." The Harvey Estate in Santa Fe address: 1014 Old Santa Fe Trail, the address of Forrest Fenn: 1021 Old Santa Fe Trail. Directly across the street from one another...the Harvey's and the Fenn's lived. The obituary says, "strong sense of connection to indigenous peoples." IMO, this sentiment was shared by Forrest. As a testament to this shared sentiment is the turquoise bracelet that was placed into the treasure chest. There is a link to Egyptology and the "strong sense of connection to indigenous peoples," and it is established with the turquoise bracelet.

    And so what do we call this sentiment? Archeology? Anthropology? Paleontology? Egyptology? History? Sure....why not. Is this an "answer I already know" in his poem? Is this the part of "himself" (sentiment) that he placed into the chest? Does the story of the turquoise bracelet and Byron Harvey and his sentiment account for a part of the winning solve?

    If a solve can't account for the sentiment of Forrest and the turquoise bracelet....then it cannot do it. He said he placed something of himself into the chest....or something like that......didn't he? Isn't a clear understanding of "the answer I already know" a requirement for the correct solve? Cheers.
    Last edited by trueyeti; 12-03-2022, 06:17 PM.

    Comment


    • #3
      I just kinda stick with the book. Anything else is just noise and potential distraction. Before the treasure chest was located, it was all about the hunt, but now there's other elements to consider. Forrest played a Jack, whether he was the actual finder or not.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Old Pilot

        I don't have likely-to-be-satisfactory answers to all your questions, nor enough interest in them to try. But thanks for your interest. Not everyone here joined this treasure hunt to learn everything about everything and everybody.
        In my opinion: neither the scissors nor the stick will help solve the poem; they are just little items that Forrest added for amusement . . . and they haven't
        provided a lot of amusement for everyone. Cheers.
        Hey OP,
        Do you see a connection to the correct solve that involves the turquoise bracelet? What is it? Cheers.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Round Peg, Square Hole View Post
          I just kinda stick with the book. Anything else is just noise and potential distraction. Before the treasure chest was located, it was all about the hunt, but now there's other elements to consider. Forrest played a Jack, whether he was the actual finder or not.
          Hey RPSH,
          Yeah....I get it. Byron Harvey is in the book. Do you think that Forrest got any of his Indian Artifacts from the Harvey's besides the turquoise bracelet? Cheers.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by trueyeti View Post
            It is reasonable to think that the scissors in Forrest’s chest can be linked to his giant ball of string. It is reasonable that the stick in the chest has been the cause of some consternation among the searchers in this community. I offer something for consideration.....from an article I saw today.

            Below is a link to an MSN article by Aimee White that pictures 3 items known as “the Dixon Relics,” found in 1872 under the Khufu Pyramid, Giza.


            From the article: “For such a grand pyramid very few artifacts were discovered; just three items, in fact. Commonly referred to as 'the Dixon Relics', named after Waynman Dixon who found them in 1872, the items consist of a granite sphere, a forked copper instrument and a wooden slat. The forked instrument may once have included a bone or wooden handle and was likely used to manipulate rope, while the granite sphere worked as a pounder.”

            It is interesting that these 3-relics seem to share a similarity with the items in Forrest’s chest:
            The granite ball….Forrest’s ball of string (the scissors can infer the cutting of a string)
            The forked copper instrument is associated with rope….Forrest’s scissors with string
            The wooden slat….the wooden stick pictured in the chest

            Link to the article: https://www.msn.com/en-us/travel/tri...02517c#image=6
            ​Cheers
            I never thought about the scissors and ball of string… hmmm. Anybody know where the worlds largest ball of string can be found?

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Imeverybodynow View Post

              I never thought about the scissors and ball of string… hmmm. Anybody know where the worlds largest ball of string can be found?
              Cawker City, KS

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Imeverybodynow View Post

                I never thought about the scissors and ball of string… hmmm. Anybody know where the worlds largest ball of string can be found?
                Where do the lines cross and where is the "X" that marks the spot? What does a ball, a string, a pair of scissors, and a stick represent? What does all that have to do with Egypt? What does it say? Cheers.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Imeverybodynow
                  So that’s where the post man took it, eh?!
                  lol
                  Makes sense. It's only 29 miles (30 mins) south from the geographic center of the contiguous United States.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by trueyeti View Post

                    Where do the lines cross and where is the "X" that marks the spot?
                    "There's a place I know about..."

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Redneck Express View Post

                      "There's a place I know about..."
                      Hey RE,
                      Does that place have a date, cause I'd like to go. Cheers.
                      Last edited by trueyeti; 12-05-2022, 10:36 AM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by mountain digger

                        If it's not in the poem, it's not a clue and won't get you closer . Outside TTOTC? ...well, that'd be a WAG. Only one WAG can possibly help, and that would be [if by pure chance one guesses this correctly]: "There are many places in the Rocky Mountains where warm waters halt, and nearly all of them are north of Santa Fe." I know this because f said it you don't have that one nailed down, you don't have anything.

                        Many here keep pushing their solves like they don't involve WAGs. Seems to me they're just waggin' their tales (tails). lol​
                        What kind of nails do you think we'd need?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by mountain digger

                          would we really be needing nails?
                          Only if I trade you some for a good solve...

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Old Pilot

                            Nope;
                            I dunno.
                            I didn't use many different sources of information in order to solve the poem. I did read three of Forrest's books: TTOTC, TFTW, and UOAW.
                            Hey OP,
                            I encourage the consideration of a solve that fits the poem and the book and the items in the chest to triangulate a locality that fits all of his hints, clues, stories...etc.... IMO...the bracelet is part of the "riches new and old" and therefor, it is represented within the poem. I point out that the story of that bracelet is in the same chapter...where the poem appears.....Cheers.

                            Comment

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