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Final clue- parking lot of Denver Museum of Nature and Science

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  • Final clue- parking lot of Denver Museum of Nature and Science

    The biggest hint from Forrest regarding the last clue would be where he parked his car in the parking lot of the Denver Museum of Nature and Science was that your sedan would parked right next to the final clue. And if you pulled up a picture of the parking lot you'd find something familiar that would cement your connection to that spot.

    Click image for larger version  Name:	Denver_Museum_of_Nature_and_Science_View_from_north_west (2).jpg Views:	0 Size:	14.0 KB ID:	417735

    Let's see just how far others can overcook it. The advantage to solving the poem was to look at the least complicated option for each clue with a sprinkle of imagination. The moment you inject intelect into the poem it falls apart. Every single one of us wanted to outsmart f but it required the mind of a 13 year old and nothing more.

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  • #2
    One interesting thing about the parking lot of the Museum is that if one where to fly from the West Entrance of YNP and head exactly 135deg Southeast you would eventually cross right over the parking lot. Forrest did tell Cynthia that Denver was in the middle (the middle between East and South?). I would think Forrest would have tried this at some point.
    Post-it note

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    • #3
      Didn't this "final clue" statement come from Doug Preston instead of Forrest Fenn? I never thought there was much to it . . . and still don't. In fact, it appears to be quite misleading, in my opinion.

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      • #4
        It was very much a clue from Forrest to the COLD BLUE ANGLE of the Rainbow ( your effort will be worth the COLD. If you pin the museum on Google's Map of Colorado and use a protractor placed on the SW corner of the map ( Four Corners Monument ) and project the angle of 40 degrees from here going NE you will find it locates the tip of the pin at Denver Museum.
        Use Google Maps ( not Google Earth ) It is the way Forrest used geometry angles on the map in order to take you to the treasure.
        I urge you to try this before dismissing it out of hand, it was a CLUE from Forrest.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by starwheel View Post
          It was very much a clue from Forrest to the COLD BLUE ANGLE of the Rainbow ( your effort will be worth the COLD. If you pin the museum on Google's Map of Colorado and use a protractor placed on the SW corner of the map ( Four Corners Monument ) and project the angle of 40 degrees from here going NE you will find it locates the tip of the pin at Denver Museum.
          Use Google Maps ( not Google Earth ) It is the way Forrest used geometry angles on the map in order to take you to the treasure.
          I urge you to try this before dismissing it out of hand, it was a CLUE from Forrest.
          And how did you come to land on the number 40? Was that just guesswork?

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          • #6
            I think he was referring to “last stand of the grizzly” bronze statue. He was always hinting at his bears literally all over the place.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Space Hopper View Post

              And how did you come to land on the number 40? Was that just guesswork?
              Space Hopper No guesswork involved at all. Many mention the rainbow but never explore it as the means to an end, it is clearly important for Forrest to mention it, it has to be treated as the puzzle that it is. There are two colors of the rainbow that have angles attached to them if you research it. RED is seen at a 42 degree angle and BLUE is seen at a 40 degree angle. Red and Blue mixed make Violet, the end color of the rainbow. Forrest sets us the task of finding where WARM WATERS are to begin the chase. The colors of RED and BLUE appear on faucets where RED stands for HOT and BLUE means COLD. BLUE is known as a COLD color, therefore to find his treasure on a map we must use 40 degrees of angle to find it. If a BLUE angle strikes a place on the map that means RED then the result would be WARM WATERS and between 42 and 40 would be represented by the number 41. And 41 is the number of the word OMEGA added via its relation of its letters to number position in the alphabet.

              To prove this the full word RAINBOW adds up to 82 and having two ends would be dividing 82 by 2 giving the number 41, this is the explanation for the two OMEGAS in the colophon of his book.
              If in order to find his treasure we read the second line of Stanza 6 which says: "YOUR EFFORT WILL BE WORTH THE COLD" then the angle of 40 degrees must logically be the angle to use. Denver Museum location using angle of 40 degrees confirms this.

              To clarify further the pin that Google Maps places for you is RED and is found by a BLUE. angle, this will be how you find the starting location on the map of Colorado. The map corners are used to find WHERE WARM WATERS HALT. So using the SE corner of Colorado's map you project the angle of 40 into its interior on Google Map. You should find it will select the tiny ring mark representing 'COLORADO SPRINGS' precisely. Why would this be? The answer lies in understanding the meaning of Colorado's name, COLORADO means RED and it is found by a projected angle of 40 degrees from the maps SE corner. BLUE meets RED and makes VIOLET, it is also of mix of HOT and COLD and therefore is also WARM WATERS. Notice that the word WATERS is plural not singular. SPRINGS is also plural.
              THIS IS WHERE YOU BEGIN TO FOLLOW THE NEXT CLUES from.

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              • #8
                Parking lots can be used for more than just cars.
                “Therefore you now have sorrow; but I will see you again and your heart will rejoice, and your joy no one will take from you.”

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                • #9
                  Click image for larger version

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                  source: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/File...nd_Science.jpg

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Hear me all View Post
                    The biggest hint from Forrest regarding the last clue would be where he parked his car in the parking lot of the Denver Museum of Nature and Science was that your sedan would parked right next to the final clue. And if you pulled up a picture of the parking lot you'd find something familiar that would cement your connection to that spot.

                    Let's see just how far others can overcook it. The advantage to solving the poem was to look at the least complicated option for each clue with a sprinkle of imagination. The moment you inject intelect into the poem it falls apart. Every single one of us wanted to outsmart f but it required the mind of a 13 year old and nothing more.
                    In the parking lot of the Denver Museum of Nature and Science, anagrams to, Focus on enumerated formula, kinesthetic path never ending. If you can find the enumerated formula in the peom, you can find the treasure.
                    All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident.
                    --Arthur Schopenhauer--

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by fflegacy
                      I don't see any hints here.
                      And I don't see a parking lot.

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                      • #12
                        According to Preston, that was going to be the final clue, where they found his car. And to me, the most obvious interpretation of that clue would have been that he wasn't in New Mexico. But that's not what happened -- nobody ever went looking for missing Forrest's missing vehicle, so that clue, whatever it was, was never delivered (though, if Preston's account is accurate, it would still indicate Forrest hadn't planned on leaving the chest in New Mexico).

                        About the most interesting thing about the DMNS parking lot, to me, is that Soldierstone points right at it. Of course, Soldierstone points right at a lot of places, but it's still fun to play around with.

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