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The nook log IMO

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  • Originally posted by Must Listengood View Post

    For at least a few, it was because the blaze was damaged and that's why they didn't find it, in my opinion. They gave up. For Vertigo, it was because he solved it AFTER Jack found the chest. The only thing he knew was that it was in Wyoming. Then he used the poem. And still for others, they basically solved the poem, but lacked the confidence to cross the river. They MIGHT have found it if they had crossed (Rudy Greene for example), but since the blaze was damaged, I doubt it. It would have taken a Steuf-like grid search to find it.

    Those who think there was a river in the poem, first need to review why 'take it' (was in the poem) was used instead of 'follow it' (not in the poem). Secondly, ask themselves why Fenn would suddenly refer to this river as the hoB, after already referring to that (twice) as simply 'it'?

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    • Originally posted by CRM114 View Post

      Fenn said the average person could find it, and you say the average person can't understand it. That's a big fail on Fenn's part if true.
      You're making the same mistake again. You're idea of average isn't Fenn's idea of average. A lot of people assume they are just "average." I'm sure Fenn did too. Could be he put himself in the category as average and thus a true statement. People need to wake up. THEY ARE NOT FORREST FENN, THEY DO NOT THINK LIKE FORREST FENN. Thus, your interpretation of what Fenn said or wrote is not valid.

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      • Originally posted by Not4but242Walk View Post


        Those who think there was a river in the poem, first need to review why 'take it' (was in the poem) was used instead of 'follow it' (not in the poem). Secondly, ask themselves why Fenn would suddenly refer to this river as the hoB, after already referring to that (twice) as simply 'it'?
        And why do you need to "put in" when you are already in the river? The only explanation anyone seems to have is that its understood that while the warm waters halt at the Madison River, for some reason you take the road through Madison Canyon down, as if they are interchangeable with respect to the poem's instructions.

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        • Originally posted by Not4but242Walk View Post


          Those who think there was a river in the poem, first need to review why 'take it' (was in the poem) was used instead of 'follow it' (not in the poem). Secondly, ask themselves why Fenn would suddenly refer to this river as the hoB, after already referring to that (twice) as simply 'it'?
          I think HOB is the hole and/or the creek, not the whole river. I think Forrest liked "take" better than "follow", as "take" is commonly used when giving directions. Of course I know you already know why he used "take", I get it. If you want to explain it, briefly, I'd be happy to listen. But frankly, believing there is no river in the poem is kind of shocking to me.

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          • Originally posted by Macahol View Post

            And why do you need to "put in" when you are already in the river? The only explanation anyone seems to have is that its understood that while the warm waters halt at the Madison River, for some reason you take the road through Madison Canyon down, as if they are interchangeable with respect to the poem's instructions.
            I think that's a valid comment and question, but my answer is that you know you are RIDING because its too far to walk. I mean, I always knew I would have to drive very close to the PIBTHOB because he told us that in the poem. We could perhaps ride a bike there, but it's obvious we take a road there of some kind. We can't walk (or wade) there.

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            • Originally posted by Must Listengood View Post

              I think HOB is the hole and/or the creek, not the whole river. I think Forrest liked "take" better than "follow", as "take" is commonly used when giving directions. Of course I know you already know why he used "take", I get it. If you want to explain it, briefly, I'd be happy to listen. But frankly, believing there is no river in the poem is kind of shocking to me.
              Take means 'it' came with you. Follow means 'it' did not.

              your flight ('it')
              Click image for larger version  Name:	B17_-_Chino_Airshow_2014_(framed).jpg Views:	0 Size:	2.68 MB ID:	414618

              I do think hoB is a water feature though. But 'home is where you are when you are not travelling, so 'a lake' for a freshwater Brown trout.

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              • Originally posted by Not4but242Walk View Post

                Take means 'it' came with you. Follow means 'it' did not.

                your flight ('it')
                Click image for larger version Name:	B17_-_Chino_Airshow_2014_(framed).jpg Views:	0 Size:	2.68 MB ID:	414618

                I do think hoB is a water feature though. But 'home is where you are when you are not travelling, so 'a lake' for a freshwater Brown trout.
                OK, that's a theory. But people commonly say "take the highway West, then turn south on...". They don't mean to physically take the highway with you. There's nothing wrong with your theory, except that you didn't start at the right WWWH, so you are hopelessly lost (like most of the rest of us) from that point on. In my opinion of course.

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                • Originally posted by Must Listengood View Post

                  OK, that's a theory. But people commonly say "take the highway West, then turn south on...". They don't mean to physically take the highway with you. There's nothing wrong with your theory, except that you didn't start at the right WWWH, so you are hopelessly lost (like most of the rest of us) from that point on. In my opinion of course.

                  Yes, but they say that on a whim, not after spending 15 years perfecting a poem to their liking.

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                  • Originally posted by Must Listengood View Post

                    OK, that's a theory. But people commonly say "take the highway West, then turn south on...". They don't mean to physically take the highway with you. There's nothing wrong with your theory, except that you didn't start at the right WWWH, so you are hopelessly lost (like most of the rest of us) from that point on. In my opinion of course.
                    To me, that makes a roadway of some type the most likely choice for the "it" you are taking down. But in that case, a road that could be considered synonymous with WWWH by itself would be a better candidate than a road in Madison Canyon that is next to a place WWWH (but really just merge). That's why I still think The Beartooth Hwy (MT Rte 32/US 212) is the best candidate out there, particularly at the point where the 110th meridian crosses it. That's the best X on the map I've seen. (per the FDA regulations, 109 degrees is the upper limit of what it considers "warm" waters.)

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                    • Originally posted by djjmciv View Post

                      You're making the same mistake again. You're idea of average isn't Fenn's idea of average. A lot of people assume they are just "average." I'm sure Fenn did too. Could be he put himself in the category as average and thus a true statement. People need to wake up. THEY ARE NOT FORREST FENN, THEY DO NOT THINK LIKE FORREST FENN. Thus, your interpretation of what Fenn said or wrote is not valid.
                      I don't know how you can possibly read some convoluted meaning into the following quote:

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                      You can lead a horse to water but you can't make it drink.

                      https://globusmax.wordpress.com/2020...-solve-part-1/

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                      • I can’t not say or ask since Forrest is dead. I don’t know Forrest’s definition of average. You ask a math teacher working at a high school that’s 100% economically disadvantage what the average student is and you’ll get test scores of 65. Ask another teacher working at a very expensive private school and you may get test scores of 90. Wait, what!!!???? How can the meanings be different?? There are generic definition of terms but ultimately it does come down to the writer/speaker. When I use the word “booshie” I use it completely opposite of its official meaning. Because to me booshie sounds like something more cheap and poor than luxury. And I will continue to use it with my own definition.
                        Last edited by djjmciv; 05-14-2022, 02:27 PM.

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                        • Originally posted by Must Listengood View Post
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                          These splits/ check do NOT close themselves up. Log homes do this when they were built with moisture content a little high. They are also prone to split like this on south facing walls or near the fireplace/wood stove. If it happens on the exterior of the house they are treated with sealer and monitored to make sure they don't get worse or rot through. If they are facing up they need to be treated or they will hold and absorb water and rot from inside out. All checks/splits wider than a 1/4 inch need treatment or they will always continue to split and rot. At no time do they "heal" themselves no matter how much moisture they get. This is the deal breaker on this being the same log

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                          • Originally posted by rmx63 View Post

                            These splits/ check do NOT close themselves up.
                            I'm not a dendrochonologist, but I have seen episodes of Oak Island, so I have that going for me. But I agree with you. I'm just not seeing all of the fine linens that everyone's talking about. The emperor still looks naked to me.

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                            • Originally posted by CRM114 View Post
                              Too bad that big crack is completely missing.
                              Yes, it seems unlikely that the big crack has closed so quickly and almost without a trace. I think both pictures show a log probably fallen during the 1988 fire. Thus, for more than 30 years the big crack (purple) has opened. Then in less than 3 years the big crack has closed. It's not impossible, but difficult to believe.
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                              • Originally posted by steve66 View Post

                                Yes, it seems unlikely that the big crack has closed so quickly and almost without a trace. I think both pictures show a log probably fallen during the 1988 fire. Thus, for more than 30 years the big crack (purple) has opened. Then in less than 3 years the big crack has closed. It's not impossible, but difficult to believe.
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                                This is the best overlay yet, thanks for making it. There is almost no relative movement between the yellow and red areas, which people conveniently ignored before. There is odd and unexpected behavior. The big check (crack) compresses shut and the little ones seem to open up regardless of what debris may have accumulated in the big check. Wood can shrink/swell as it gets dry/wet, sure, but checks stay open unless compression is applied somewhere. The blue and green areas are definitely swelling, so you could say the big check is getting compressed shut by the swell pressure, but that can't be, because the smaller checks are opening up.

                                One thing your overlay proves, if everything is legitimate, is that the big check must "breathe" open and shut with moisture. Since the yellow and red areas maintain the same almost the same distance apart, it can't be due to them moving apart over the two years. Most of the relative movement is in blue and green, and specifically due to swelling/shrinking.

                                Also, if everything is legitimate with the logs, this is just another huge heap of evidence we have been lied to about the date of the find. The blue and green areas are completely dried and shrunken in the chest photo, to match the dried up soil. There is almost zero chance the photos of log and chest were taken at NMH on June 5th, 2020, with 1.5 inches of rain in the two weeks prior - plenty enough moisture to accomplish the apparent swelling.

                                One way or another, something is extremely fishy, and it's not just the story we are to believe about the poem about a fish.

                                Last edited by CRM114; 05-15-2022, 10:05 AM.
                                You can lead a horse to water but you can't make it drink.

                                https://globusmax.wordpress.com/2020...-solve-part-1/

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