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  • #16
    Originally posted by Spallies View Post
    Just me or is the Matrix glitching?
    Most definitely.

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    • #17
      I would say the blocked kidney has everything to do with the solution. Why is it that I must go his cancer, his blocked kidney.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Longfellow View Post
        Well now, there is that reference to Mr. U PUCEET (you pee you see it) from scrapbook 107…
        Nice one!

        I'm also reminded of this:

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        The "tube" arrow. (How easy it would be to make that "f" into a "p".)

        From Furst's The Water of Life
        ". . . sometimes the Water of Life is paired with its complementary opposite, "Death Bringer," which may be a baton, a pointed stick, or perhaps a specialized arrow.


        (Edit: this has also made me recall FF's little homily: "family comes first." It could so easily become "family comes Furst." But perhaps that is a stretch!)
        voxpops
        Senior Member
        Last edited by voxpops; 01-14-2022, 12:07 AM.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by elperro View Post
          As I understand it, the treasure is still out there. The chest is still out there. I'm not so sure about the trove. You just have to "get back in the box," as per the 6 questions edition below. Oh ya, thinking like a 13 year old, and a dictionary could help. All IMO.

          Mr. Fenn,

          I am not even close to solving your riddle. I’ve tried for months and nothing works. I am not asking for a clue to the treasure, I’m asking for a clue to the clues. Please help me. ~Mary.

          Dear Mz. Mary,
          The solve is difficult for many searchers because their minds think the clues are tougher to decrypt than they really are.

          Some say they are trying to think outside the box, as if the solution lies somewhere out there.

          Until now I have resisted telling them to get back in the box where their thoughts are comfortable and flow more easily.

          The blueprint is challenging so the treasure may be located by the one who can best adjust. To illustrate my point go to YouTube – Smarter Every Day. f
          elperro
          Senior Member
          elperro It amazes me that searchers still do not believe there is a cipher of sorts used in this puzzle when in your Forrest quote you have the word DECRYPT, and elsewhere he has used the word DECIPHER also. It might help if you all look into this more deeply and explore the reasons why he uses those words.

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          • #20
            Have y'all ever considered checking the "water closet" for the treasure......

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Knowledge View Post
              I would say the blocked kidney has everything to do with the solution. Why is it that I must go his cancer, his blocked kidney.
              Stanza 5 is interesting. A few weeks ago I seem to remember someone brought up the possibility of the "I" in that section being that of the searcher. I've been wondering whether it will be necessary for the searcher to go to "Why" after retrieving the chest and to deposit their finds in that location, because they are now tired and weak - and, most importantly, they must prepare for the next "descendant" in the lineage. In the Playboy interview FF talks about renting a cabin for a night:

              "And … if you rent a cabin, uh, in West Yellowstone, out there by itself, for a week, what are you renting? You rent the bed, you rent the kitchen, you rent the cabin and the roof, you rent the front yard? So if I buried the treasure in the front yard of the cabin that I rented, it’s on my property, right? Where am I wrong? I mean, there … if the government has an easement into your land, right? Utility people, the telephone people have a legal easement to come on your property to work on your telephone outside on the telephone pole. If I buried it on that easement, what does the law say about that? And what does the word buried mean? What does the word sepulchered mean? What does the word entombment mean? And what’s the relation between what’s a trove … what does abandoned mean, what does stored … What’s the difference between abandoning something and storing it? You see how muddy the water can get? The lawyers can’t figure that out.”

              In this scenario the finder won't own the chest (and its secrets), but will be its custodian - for at least a night. That solves a lot of legal issues!

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by wwwamericana View Post
                Have y'all ever considered checking the "water closet" for the treasure......

                Click image for larger version  Name:	Victorian-Antique-Water-Closet.jpg Views:	0 Size:	166.6 KB ID:	374335
                Well (ahem...), that's interesting because in SB 99.5 (is he making an important point) Forrest talks about the closet leading off his bathroom and in the next picture we see his WC.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by voxpops View Post

                  Stanza 5 is interesting. A few weeks ago I seem to remember someone brought up the possibility of the "I" in that section being that of the searcher. I've been wondering whether it will be necessary for the searcher to go to "Why" after retrieving the chest and to deposit their finds in that location, because they are now tired and weak - and, most importantly, they must prepare for the next "descendant" in the lineage. In the Playboy interview FF talks about renting a cabin for a night:

                  "And … if you rent a cabin, uh, in West Yellowstone, out there by itself, for a week, what are you renting? You rent the bed, you rent the kitchen, you rent the cabin and the roof, you rent the front yard? So if I buried the treasure in the front yard of the cabin that I rented, it’s on my property, right? Where am I wrong? I mean, there … if the government has an easement into your land, right? Utility people, the telephone people have a legal easement to come on your property to work on your telephone outside on the telephone pole. If I buried it on that easement, what does the law say about that? And what does the word buried mean? What does the word sepulchered mean? What does the word entombment mean? And what’s the relation between what’s a trove … what does abandoned mean, what does stored … What’s the difference between abandoning something and storing it? You see how muddy the water can get? The lawyers can’t figure that out.”

                  In this scenario the finder won't own the chest (and its secrets), but will be its custodian - for at least a night. That solves a lot of legal issues!
                  Your post took me back to the janitor/custodian at the school -
                  what was her name?

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by voxpops View Post

                    Stanza 5 is interesting. A few weeks ago I seem to remember someone brought up the possibility of the "I" in that section being that of the searcher. I've been wondering whether it will be necessary for the searcher to go to "Why" after retrieving the chest and to deposit their finds in that location, because they are now tired and weak - and, most importantly, they must prepare for the next "descendant" in the lineage. In the Playboy interview FF talks about renting a cabin for a night:

                    "And … if you rent a cabin, uh, in West Yellowstone, out there by itself, for a week, what are you renting? You rent the bed, you rent the kitchen, you rent the cabin and the roof, you rent the front yard? So if I buried the treasure in the front yard of the cabin that I rented, it’s on my property, right? Where am I wrong? I mean, there … if the government has an easement into your land, right? Utility people, the telephone people have a legal easement to come on your property to work on your telephone outside on the telephone pole. If I buried it on that easement, what does the law say about that? And what does the word buried mean? What does the word sepulchered mean? What does the word entombment mean? And what’s the relation between what’s a trove … what does abandoned mean, what does stored … What’s the difference between abandoning something and storing it? You see how muddy the water can get? The lawyers can’t figure that out.”

                    In this scenario the finder won't own the chest (and its secrets), but will be its custodian - for at least a night. That solves a lot of legal issues!
                    In the context of what's above, the following quote from FF is interesting:
                    "there is one thing in the chest that I have not talked about except to say I don’t want to talk about it. It is something saved especially for the person who solves the clues."

                    If there's just one thing saved for the solver, then who are the other things for???

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by wwwamericana View Post

                      Your post took me back to the janitor/custodian at the school -
                      what was her name?
                      You have me at a disadvantage there as I don't own the books.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by voxpops View Post

                        Well (ahem...), that's interesting because in SB 99.5 (is he making an important point) Forrest talks about the closet leading off his bathroom and in the next picture we see his WC.
                        LOL - I really don't believe that is a "Spanish traveling desk" - do some homework y'all.....
                        wwwamericana
                        Senior Member
                        Last edited by wwwamericana; 01-14-2022, 12:50 AM.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by voxpops View Post

                          You have me at a disadvantage there as I don't own the books.
                          I'm sorry.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by wwwamericana View Post

                            LOL - I really don't believe that is a "Spanish traveling desk" - do some homework y'all.....
                            Thanks for pointing that out - it does seem a trifle unwieldy. I actually think that his aberrations are often there to draw your attention to the stuff out on the edges - in this case the toilet.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by wwwamericana View Post

                              I'm sorry.
                              Don't be. It's made me really listen to the poem without worrying too much about odd or unlikely stories.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by voxpops View Post

                                Well (ahem...), that's interesting because in SB 99.5 (is he making an important point) Forrest talks about the closet leading off his bathroom and in the next picture we see his WC.
                                The comfortable Throne!

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