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  • #61
    Originally posted by FenndersKeepers View Post

    Thank you very much. I really appreciate that.

    No. Forrest never told me my solution was wrong. I wrote him after he said it was found in Wyoming. I told him that I didn’t believe it and that I thought he was lying.

    He messaged back: “What proof do you have that it wasn’t in WYO?”
    Why not just say, “Rick, listen, you’re wrong.” ? Or “Your solution was incorrect.” ?
    We didn’t know each other, but I had written him every time while BOTG and many times before and after. He knew how frustrated I had been at times.
    I also wrote the song for him. Why not just tell me I was wrong after the chest was found? Why did he say what he said? The way he did?
    One time I presented f with my findings and he said something like, "think your clever with your tiny little leaf?".
    Well, no, I saw it as part of a big tree...

    Comment


    • #62
      Originally posted by voxpops View Post
      FenndersKeepers
      Senior Member
      FenndersKeepers and
      Sirius B
      Senior Member
      Sirius B

      There is something very curious at Whale Rock:

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      What it is I have no idea. Whether it has any connection to Fenn would be pure speculation. All I can say for sure is that there is something odd about the chase and something odd about Whale Rock.
      Maybe whale rock is really in the Canadian arctic at the Devon Island station? That's where the pic below was taken. Instead, of real space exploration and pictures of the actual planet Mars, they took all that money and sent it through a black hole. It's pretty cheap to go to Devon actually. Maybe other things, (like the Byrd safari photo, QED) are also faked to divert attention from public scrutiny or provide an alibi? I seem to recall some themes involving Stanley Kubrick here, but that's the last thing this thread needs, and Cowboyrocker already hat-tipped it, so. There it is.

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      Sirius B
      Senior Member
      Last edited by Sirius B; 01-02-2022, 05:16 PM.

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      • #63
        Originally posted by Sirius B View Post

        Maybe whale rock is really in the Canadian arctic at the Devon Island station? That's where the pic below was taken. Instead, of real space exploration and pictures of the actual planet Mars, they took all that money and sent it through a black hole. It's pretty cheap to go to Devon actually. Maybe other things, (like the Byrd safari photo, QED) are also faked to divert attention from public scrutiny of financial crime?

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        I actually think man (on the whole) is nobler than that. There are so many thousands of people involved in space exploration worldwide that faking it all (or even parts of it) would expose governments to ridicule if just one person spilled the beans. And the scientific advances that have come directly or indirectly from the space programs of different countries has been remarkable in our lifetimes. I think it would cost almost as much to fake the hardware and the huge infrastructure as it would to do the real thing. Mankind wants to explore and if you can build a car, a plane, a rocket, a lander, a rover, a space telescope you're going to do it. (Who wants to spend their lifetime on fakery? What if Columbus had faked his voyage?) Astronomers and even schools can listen in to space vehicle signals and track the craft. The unfortunate accidents that occur, mercifully, very infrequently are also testament to the risks and missteps.

        That said, I think in your earlier post you raised an important question about Fenn's apparent FOIA request:
        It always struck me as odd. I mean if you were there, why would you be checking? Just to see if your name if was there? Not sure if it means anything, but anybody with the capability might search Fenn's FOIA requests about his own service. It seemed clear to me that he was trying to see if there was a paper trail leading back to him before the Roadrunners or the Propwash Gang got their sites up. I have no idea whether it leads to Fenn in Dreamland, but it seemed so odd to me that Fenn was making FOIA requests about his own service while the chase was years underway. I suppose he never could have anticipated when that material would be declassified, and thus when it was, he moved into action.
        Forrest was always leaving little crumbs for searchers to follow. Perhaps the FOIA was meant to be found - to generate a discussion such as this one. I really do believe that he had important information to impart and it seems quite likely that it's connected with flight in one form or another.

        Comment


        • #64
          Originally posted by voxpops View Post

          I actually think man (on the whole) is nobler than that. There are so many thousands of people involved in space exploration worldwide that faking it all (or even parts of it) would expose governments to ridicule if just one person spilled the beans. And the scientific advances that have come directly or indirectly from the space programs of different countries has been remarkable in our lifetimes. I think it would cost almost as much to fake the hardware and the huge infrastructure as it would to do the real thing. Mankind wants to explore and if you can build a car, a plane, a rocket, a lander, a rover, a space telescope you're going to do it. (Who wants to spend their lifetime on fakery? What if Columbus had faked his voyage?) Astronomers and even schools can listen in to space vehicle signals and track the craft. The unfortunate accidents that occur, mercifully, very infrequently are also testament to the risks and missteps.

          That said, I think in your earlier post you raised an important question about Fenn's apparent FOIA request:


          Forrest was always leaving little crumbs for searchers to follow. Perhaps the FOIA was meant to be found - to generate a discussion such as this one. I really do believe that he had important information to impart and it seems quite likely that it's connected with flight in one form or another.
          I hope so, and I only posted it in relation to the idea that a photo doesn't mean much.

          I'll be totally upfront. Fenn connects to the Suite 8F Group in multiple ways which I have laid out factually elsewhere. These people were active during Fenn's whole career, and for all intents and purposes, were the military industrial complex. These were the guys Ike and Kubrick were warning us about. I haven't even mentioned his partnership with Connelly selling the de Hory fakes that Algur Meadows bought. How exactly did that come about? How did Connelly know Fenn? I told you about Byrd. Go to this post and look at the video I clipped- https://www.hintofriches.com/forum/t...217#post368217

          All my crumbs seem to lead to the same place.
          Sirius B
          Senior Member
          Last edited by Sirius B; 01-02-2022, 06:46 PM.

          Comment


          • #65
            Originally posted by artislurker View Post

            He was kind enough to directly tell both lawyer Barbara and Dave from Massachusetts that they were wrong. Very strange that he wouldn't do that with you, so much so due to the fact that you helped him achieve one of his life's ambitions before he died. The estate withheld the will inventory from public disclosure and Kpro mentioned that Fenn's office door is locked and no one is allowed inside. I believe you must be listed in those 200 pages. Perhaps he felt that the eventual reward would compensate for the cruelty. But did you solve the poem? You do point to a hidden secret in your solution. I do look forward to anything you care to share about your solution.
            I honestly thought I had solved the poem, but I must not have because I’m not the one with the chest full of gold. There is something about the site I’ve always believed was the one true spot. Forrest said that if you were in the right spot, “Something you haven’t thought about should be obvious to you.” Well, I believe I know what that means. I believe there is work involved. Remember when Forrest said, “the chest is heavy, best to have gloves.” ?
            He also devoted a whole page in TFTW, page 257, to a picture of the Underwood typewriter. I think he was hinting at something with that that confirms the spot.
            Regardless of whether the chest is actually found or not, I’m planning another trip in late spring after heavy loads and water high has subsided.

            Comment


            • #66
              Originally posted by Sirius B View Post

              I hope so, and I only posted it in relation to the idea that a photo doesn't mean much.

              I'll be totally upfront. Fenn connects to the Suite 8F Group in multiple ways which I have laid out factually elsewhere. These people were during Fenn's whole career, and for all intents and purposes, the military industrial complex. I haven't even mentioned his partnership with Connelly selling the de Hory fakes that Algur Meadows bought. How exactly did that come about? How did Connelly know Fenn?
              I told you about Byrd. Go to this post and look at the video I clipped- https://www.hintofriches.com/forum/t...217#post368217

              All my crumbs seem to lead to the same place.
              It makes some sense that Fenn knew Connally. He probably knew a whole bunch of wealthy people from the southwest of many backgrounds, being a premier art dealer. Interesting that he later knew John Connally and Jackie Kennedy. Both were in the limousine with JFK when he was assassinated.

              I get your point about the photos. Being in a picture with someone doesn't necessarily mean anything. A bunch of people had their pictures taken with Epstein. Were all of them sexual predators? Very doubtful. Could be worth further investigation, but also could be completely innocent.

              I could say more on the relevance of the safari photo, but I don't want to start any D.B. Cooper style conspiracies when it is likely nothing. Sirius B, PM me if you'd like.

              Comment


              • #67
                For the thread to remain productive, we should all just put it all right here to the extent you are comfortable sharing it. I've got plenty that I just can't share or PM anyone. I do what I can. Ante up everybody.

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                • #68
                  Originally posted by Sirius B View Post
                  For the thread to remain productive, we should all just put it all right here to the extent you are comfortable sharing it. I've got plenty that I just can't share or PM anyone. I do what I can. Ante up everybody.

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                  No worries. Yeah. I’ve posted enough.

                  Cheers.

                  Comment


                  • #69
                    Originally posted by Sirius B View Post
                    For the thread to remain productive, we should all just put it all right here to the extent you are comfortable sharing it. I've got plenty that I just can't share or PM anyone. I do what I can. Ante up everybody.

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                    Fair enough. I just didn't want to paint Forrest in a bad light or make something out of nothing. Even if D H. Byrd benefited by LBJ's rise to power, in doesn't automatically mean he had a hand in his death.

                    Having said that, the man in the photo appears to me to be General Frank H. Robinson, the general that Forrest was aide-de-camp for. I could very well be wrong. Even if I'm right, it likely means nothing except that Fenn probably knew D.H. Byrd, at least in passing. I've also read elsewhere that Doolittle was a frequent hunting partner of Byrd, but not on that trip in which the photo was taken.

                    Also, regarding the link of the photo to Byrds alibi, do we know for certain that that is actually Byrds alibi photo? Just because the picture on a website purporting this, does not mean it's true. While I value websites like Wikipedia (and similar) for their convenience and mostly true content, the information is not always ironclad. It is wise to go back to first hand sources whenever possible. This is more difficult, so most never do it.

                    Comment


                    • #70
                      Originally posted by ICV. View Post

                      Fair enough. I just didn't want to paint Forrest in a bad light or make something out of nothing. Even if D H. Byrd benefited by LBJ's rise to power, in doesn't automatically mean he had a hand in his death...This is more difficult, so most never do it.
                      Point well taken. As I said, there's a practical limit to any picture or insider account's usefulness without real context. The connection between Fenn and Byrd is almost certainly related to Cody, WY, where I believe Fenn and DH Jr. might have known each other growing up. They were on the board of the Museum together.

                      Here's my grandfather with his boss in Toul/Croix de Metz, December 1944. You wouldn't know it from the picture, but his boss has come down to visit and give him some hardware because he has just forced down (and captured) an Me262. This is a big secret at the time, and remains so. Officially, it was never recorded. My Grandfather was Catholic and refused throughout his service to make battle claims for money (he thought it was blood money). Wartime was one thing, but he only continued in service after WWII if he could be attached to non-combat roles. He had an incident in 1945. He described it as "unsurvivable"- crash landing a flak-damaged P-47 in heavy fog. Canopy won't open. Can't bail out. Made a deal with St. Michael, who he felt was his personal liaison with High Command. Never kill again; if he could just see his kids one more time. He did, and everybody kept their word. Just his terrestrial boss's kind of guy. EW was a big part of the cold war, and those guys didn't and don't use guns. Meanwhile they packed up the 262 and shipped it out and that was the last anybody (besides Kelly Johnson and his crew) heard about it. He later became his boss' CA at Wright Patterson, and handled similar matters requiring comparable discretion.

                      Perhaps it is similar to the relationship of Fenn to Gen Frank Robinson. I found out about my own relative from former vets, who were not at all surprised to know that I knew nothing about this, or really anything about my grandfather's career. There was a reason. In the case of the 262, to reveal how we got it, would expose growing elements of secret cooperation between USAAF and Luftwaffe command before war's end. So we had to have a good story. They took most of the stuff they got with this program and the "paperclip" scientists (like Von Braun) and sent them to places like Dreamland, Blue Ridge, Los Alamos, and Skunkworks. Places way, way out in the sticks. What we now know as "Top Gun", began as veteran pilots dog fighting and racing WWII planes out in the California desert for fun. Most of these guys ended up in top secret programs, or came from them. Yeager comes to mind.

                      There were a lot of American and Canadian pilots who knew Sloane. I think I can tell a genuine Sloane, just from the signature. I don't dare publish it online to protect other collectors. There are other "tells" in a genuine Sloane that few would perceive or think to check. You can't even post pictures anymore, because you'll see a fake within weeks. That's why I only showed a small area. I estimate that over 50% of the Sloane market (meaning stuff for sale at any given time) is fake. Fenn would have had you to believe there may have been upwards of 20,000 Sloane paintings out there (source: 17 dollars/sq in) Really? 55 years of doing 1 per day? I would estimate far fewer genuine ones. The story about Earhart and Sloane is also a fake. Sloane is a prolific author over decades who makes no mention of Fenn. Etc.

                      Whoever helped to create Sloane's legend (IMHO), used to work as a teenager in McSorley's, a place in New York where all of Sloane's character references like John Sloan and William Goudy used to drink after work. One of John Sloan's paintings is called McSorley's Saturday Night and depicts the crowd there during prohibition (seemingly well-served). Curiously, all of Sloane's references to his early activities seem to rely on the testimony of three people, all of whom who were dead or missing by 1947. Earhart is one. The other two were McSorley's regulars in the 1930's. Cooper Union and Astor Place used to be the center of the NY publishing and illustration world, and McSorley's was at the center of that. This John Sloan guy is the guy that Everard Jean Hinrichs changed his name to honor, so something's up. Honoring your idol by adding an e to his last name? In a world where your last name is the value of your work? It's weird.

                      There are elements of Sloane's story that lead me to believe that he might actually have been a German Luftwaffe pilot named Erich Hartmann. Erich's nickname was "bubi" which means "kid" in German. I associated it with Fenn's (Billy the) Kid obsession. It also recalls to me the relationship of Fenn with Ernie Blake (Ernst Bloch), another former German pilot who assumed his wartime code name and lived as an American thereafter in Taos, later founding the ski area.

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                      Sirius B
                      Senior Member
                      Last edited by Sirius B; 01-03-2022, 04:57 PM.

                      Comment


                      • #71
                        Originally posted by Sirius B View Post

                        Point well taken. As I said, there's a practical limit to any picture or insider account's usefulness without real context. The connection between Fenn and Byrd is almost certainly related to Cody, WY, where I believe Fenn and DH Jr. might have known each other growing up.

                        Here's my grandfather with his boss in Toul/Croix de Metz, December 1944. You wouldn't know it from the picture, but his boss has come down to visit and give him some hardware because he has just forced down (and captured) an Me262. This is a big secret at the time, and remains so. Officially, it was never recorded. My Grandfather was Catholic and refused throughout his service to make battle claims for money (he thought it was blood money). Wartime was one thing, but he only continued in service after WWII if he could be attached to non-combat roles. He had an incident in 1945. He described it as "unsurvivable"- crash landing a flak-damaged P-47 in heavy fog. Canopy won't open. Can't bail out. Made a deal with St. Michael, who he felt was his personal liaison with High Command. Never kill again; if he could just see his kids one more time. He did, and everybody kept their word. Just his terrestrial boss's kind of guy. EW was a big part of the cold war, and those guys didn't and don't use guns. Meanwhile they packed up the 262 and shipped it out and that was the last anybody (besides Kelly Johnson and his crew) heard about it. He later became his boss' CA at Wright Patterson. and handled similar matters requiring comparable discretion. Like Blue Book, Hebgen Lake, and Corona, NM. Stuff like that.

                        Perhaps it is similar to the relationship of Fenn to Gen Frank Robinson. I found out about my own relative from former vets, who were not at all surprised to know that I knew nothing about this, or really anything about my grandfather's career. There was a reason. In the case of the 262, to reveal how we got it, would expose growing elements of secret cooperation between USAAF and Luftwaffe command before war's end. So we had to have a good story. They took most of the stuff they got with this program and the "paperclip" scientists (like Von Braun) and sent them to places like Dreamland, Blue Ridge, Los Alamos, and Skunkworks. Places way, way out in the sticks. What we now know as "Top Gun", began as veteran pilots dog fighting and racing WWII planes out in the California desert for fun. Most of these guys ended up in top secret programs, or came from them. Yeager comes to mind.

                        There were a lot of American and Canadian pilots who knew Sloane. I think I can tell a genuine Sloane, just from the signature. I don't dare publish it online to protect other collectors. There are other "tells" in a genuine Sloane that few would perceive or think to check. You can't even post pictures anymore, because you'll see a fake within weeks. That's why I only showed a small area. I estimate that over 50% of the Sloane market (meaning stuff for sale at any given time) is fake. Fenn would have had you to believe there may have been upwards of 20,000 Sloane paintings out there (source: 17 dollars/sq in) Really? 55 years of doing 1 per day? I would estimate far fewer genuine ones. The story about Earhart and Sloane is also a fake. Sloane is a prolific author over decades who makes no mention of Fenn. Etc.

                        Whoever helped to create Sloane's legend (IMHO), used to work as a teenager in McSorley's, a place in New York where all of Sloane's character references like John Sloan and William Goudy used to drink after work. One of John Sloan's paintings is called McSorley's Saturday Night and depicts the crowd there during prohibition (seemingly well-served). Curiously, all of Sloane's references to his early activities seem to rely on the testimony of three people, all of whom who were dead or missing by 1947. Earhart is one. The other two were McSorley's regulars in the 1930's. Cooper Union and Astor Place used to be the center of the NY publishing and illustration world, and McSorley's was at the center of that. This John Sloan guy is the guy that Everard Jean Hinrichs changed his name to honor, so something's up. Honoring your idol by adding an e to his last name? In a world where your last name is the value of your work? It's weird.

                        There are elements of Sloane's story that lead me to believe that he might actually have been a German Luftwaffe pilot named Erich Hartmann. Erich's nickname was "bubi" which means "kid" in German. I associated it with Fenn's (Billy the) Kid obsession. It also recalls to me the relationship of Fenn with Ernie Blake (Ernst Bloch), another former German pilot who assumed his wartime code name and lived as an American thereafter in Taos, later founding the ski area.

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                        So... why would Fenn write a book about Sloane then? Surely he would have picked up on the fact if Sloane wasn't really putting out that many paintings. I don't have the book 17 Dollars Per Square Inch so I'll have to take your word for the claims made. I do think there is a clue in the story. Sloane's throughput does seem suspect, but not provably impossible. There are other hints in the Sloane stories, but I didn't take that as one - I probably am wrong.

                        If I understand your claim then, Fenn purposely lied in 17DPSI? I believe Fenn used his allotment of 15% fiction in his books for the treasure hunters (and IMO, admitted as much) but to say he did this in his book where his target audience was art lovers? To what end?

                        I believe there are at least three hints associated with Amelia Earhart. There may be more that I missed, but I have seen 3 connections in those stories.

                        Comment


                        • #72
                          Originally posted by ICV. View Post

                          So... why would Fenn write a book about Sloane then? Surely he would have picked up on the fact if Sloane wasn't really putting out that many paintings. I don't have the book 17 Dollars Per Square Inch so I'll have to take your word for the claims made. I do think there is a clue in the story. Sloane's throughput does seem suspect, but not provably impossible. There are other hints in the Sloane stories, but I didn't take that as one - I probably am wrong.

                          If I understand your claim then, Fenn purposely lied in 17DPSI? I believe Fenn used his allotment of 15% fiction in his books for the treasure hunters (and IMO, admitted as much) but to say he did this in his book where his target audience was art lovers? To what end?

                          I believe there are at least three hints associated with Amelia Earhart. There may be more that I missed, but I have seen 3 connections in those stories.
                          Seventeen Dollars a Square Inch was published in 2007. Sloane died in 1985.

                          I'm not accusing anybody of anything. That's a 22 year gap. You think Columbo wouldn't ask a question about a detail like that,when questioning a famous former dealer of fakes? Who was selling the works of the (long) deceased artist as recently as a couple years ago? Where were they coming from? If you're really a Sloane collector, the first guy you'd check was in Kent, Connecticut, at Sloane's museum, not Santa Fe.

                          Taking a dim view: It served Fenn's purposes if he was faking Sloanes (something about which he was experienced: see his venture with John Connelly selling De Hory fakes of masterpieces) to suggest a more prolific output on the part of Sloane than was really the case. If it was generally known how rare authentic Sloanes were, there would have been a problem explaining how Fenn managed to find so many for sale in his gallery since Sloane's death and why they seemed to be generically priced by square footage at relatively affordable prices, and not subject matter. This is highly unusual for a dead famous artist. Subject matter is the main determinant of value- covered bridges command the highest value in Sloane's work. So according to this view, creating a legend to explain all these anomalies may have been the motive for Fenn writing the book in the first place.

                          Otherwise, it's wrong and there's nothing here. I can live with that. This is all speculation. Sloane was prolific. No doubt. But it takes time to write so many books, illustrating them yourself. He traveled extensively. He was a National Academy member. Like Bob Ross he was exceedingly fast: and used the wet method on masonite throughout his entire career. If it says Sloane and its on canvas, it's fake. Here's a little secret. Sloane loved to make the frames even more than he liked to paint. He wrote several books about his love for wood. All three of the Sloanes' I have are framed from old wood cove moldings taken from old houses and barns from Connecticut area junkyards. I'd guess the wood itself is at least 250 years old. It has those little tiny black wormholes that you only see on very, very old wood, and are impossible to fake.

                          So there, I Iet it slip. There's no such thing as an authentic Sloane (that I've seen) that he didn't personally frame, unless it's a mural at the Smithsonian Air and Space. Seventeen Dollars has some story about Sloane driving by Fenn's gallery and dropping off still-wet canvasses (yes-see above) out of the trunk of his car, and that the gallery had to wait for them to dry. He describes the staff having to wait so they could frame them and hang them in the gallery. That really stuck out in my mind. That sure doesn't sound like Sloane to me.

                          So you say you got wet canvasses from an obsessive, wet-method painter who was also member of the National Academy? Out of the back of his car? The same guy who obsessively framed his own works as a secret signature? On masonite exclusively? I certainly don't think so.

                          But I'm just playing Columbo until the whole story comes out.
                          Sirius B
                          Senior Member
                          Last edited by Sirius B; 01-03-2022, 05:04 PM.

                          Comment


                          • #73
                            Originally posted by Sirius B View Post

                            Seventeen Dollars a Square Inch was published in 2007. Sloane died in 1985.

                            I'm not accusing anybody of anything. That's a 22 year gap. You think Columbo wouldn't ask a question about a detail like that,when questioning a famous former dealer of fakes? Who was selling the works of the (long) deceased artist as recently as a couple years ago? Where were they coming from? If you're really a Sloane collector, the first guy you'd check was in Kent, Connecticut, at Sloane's museum, not Santa Fe.

                            Taking a dim view: It served Fenn's purposes if he was faking Sloanes (something about which he was experienced: see his venture with John Connelly selling De Hory fakes of masterpieces) to suggest a more prolific output on the part of Sloane than was really the case. If it was generally known how rare authentic Sloanes were, there would have been a problem explaining how Fenn managed to find so many for sale in his gallery since Sloane's death and why they seemed to be generically priced by square footage at relatively affordable prices, and not subject matter. This is highly unusual for a dead famous artist. Subject matter is the main determinant of value- covered bridges command the highest value in Sloane's work. So according to this view, creating a legend to explain all these anomalies may have been the motive for Fenn writing the book in the first place.

                            Otherwise, it's wrong and there's nothing here. I can live with that. This is all speculation. Sloane was prolific. No doubt. But it takes time to write so many books, illustrating them yourself. He traveled extensively. He was a National Academy member. Like Bob Ross he was exceedingly fast: and used the wet method on masonite throughout his entire career. If it says Sloane and its on canvas, it's fake. Here's a little secret. Sloane loved to make the frames even more than he liked to paint. He wrote several books about his love for wood. All three of the Sloanes' I have are framed from old wood cove moldings taken from old houses, barns and Connecticut area junkyards. I'd guess the wood itself is at least 300 years old. It has those little tiny black wormholes that you only see on very, very old wood.

                            So there, I Iet it slip. There's no such thing as an authentic Sloane (that I've seen) that he didn't personally frame, unless it's a mural at the Smithsonian Air and Space. Seventeen Dollars has some story about Sloane driving by Fenn's gallery and dropping off still-wet canvasses (yes-see above) out of the trunk of his car, and that the gallery had to wait for them to dry. He describes the staff having to wait for the paint to dry so they could frame them and hang them in the gallery. That really stuck out in my mind. That sure doesn't sound like Sloane to me.

                            So you say you got wet canvasses from an obsessive, wet-method painter who was also member of the National Academy? Out of the back of his car? The same guy who obsessively framed his own works as a secret signature? On masonite exclusively? I certainly don't think so.

                            But I'm just playing Columbo until the whole story comes out.
                            You can play Columbo and I will play the devil's advocate -
                            so........if everything Forrest said and did was a "hoax," (I'm avoiding the word, lie)
                            the question left to us to answer is:
                            "In reality, who was Forrest Fenn?"


                            Comment


                            • #74
                              Originally posted by wwwamericana View Post

                              "In reality, who was Forrest Fenn?"
                              A talented landscape artist well-known for his inventive use of cow-pie chiaroscuro and negative space in the foreground.

                              Texas translation: "he has really good bullshit." Doesn't mean he ain't smart, and in Texas, good bullshit gives you character and standing, as long as you don't lie or hurt nobody, and if your bullshit is acceptable, you can generally do or say whatever you want. Willie Nelson and Kinky Friedman to name two good examples in practice and spirit. They're both pretty smart, but just like the NASA guys in Houston, a straight answer is unlikely. Answers, when or if encountered, are likely to include embellishment, fibs and outright bullshit. Likely to induce laughter as well.

                              So no Texans are going to judge him if it turns out he cheated some rich folks with more dollars than sense. I won't either. He told in so many ways "what's important if you want a nice painting to look at in your own house? If you like looking at it, (like Mrs Connelly's attitude about the Modigliani fake) does it really matter if there's a signature on it, all other things equal? What if it's an expert fake, alike in all details? Well, if it's somehow now worth less, then your appreciation for the art as beautiful and pleasing was somehow phony. They are identical images. De Hory was a genius. Fooled everybody. Experts too. Now, most people in the Art World would love to get their hands on a "real" De Hory fake (I know, it's richly ironic). IMHO, he was one of the greatest painters of the 20th century! Accordingly, to those who would reject hanging a De Hory "fake", the only thing beautiful in the first place was the signature and the price tag.

                              All hat and no cattle does not a cowboy make in Texas.
                              Sirius B
                              Senior Member
                              Last edited by Sirius B; 01-04-2022, 03:42 PM.

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                              • #75
                                Originally posted by Sirius B View Post

                                A talented landscape artist well-known for his inventive use of cow-pie chiaroscuro and negative space in the foreground.

                                Texas translation: "he has really good bullshit." Doesn't mean he ain't smart, and in Texas, good bullshit gives you character and standing, as long as you don't lie or hurt nobody, and if your bullshit is acceptable, you can generally do or say whatever you want. Willie Nelson and Kinky Friedman to name two good examples in practice and spirit. They're both pretty smart, but like NASA, a straight answer is often hard to come by. Answers, when or if encountered, are likely to include embellishment, fibs and outright bullshit.

                                So no Texans are going to judge him if it turns out he cheated some rich folks with more money than sense. I won't either. He told in so many ways "what's important if you want a nice painting to look at in your own house? If you like looking at it, (like Mrs Connelly's attitude about the Modigliani fake) does it really matter if there's a signature on it, all other things equal? What if it's an expert fake, alike in all details? Well, if it's somehow now worth less, then your appreciation for the art as beautiful and pleasing was somehow phony. They are identical images. De Hory was a genius. Fooled everybody. Experts too. Now, most people in the Art World would love to get their hands on a "real" De Hory fake (I know, it's richly ironic). IMHO, he was one of the greatest painters of the 20th century! Accordingly, to those who would reject hanging a De Hory "fake", the only thing beautiful in the first place was the signature and the price tag.

                                All hat and no cattle does not a cowboy make in Texas.
                                So your saying he's either the Omega Man or the greatest Sloane forger? Or... Both?
                                All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy.

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