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The cowboy who slugged young Forrest

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  • The cowboy who slugged young Forrest

    In Forrest's story, he was a young boy, sitting at home (perhaps on his front porch or similar place) when a man riding a horse came by. Forrest greeted him with a called-out "Hiya, Cowboy" (or something similar/equivalent), upon which the man stopped his horse, dismounted, and without speaking to Forrest, walked over to Forrest, and slugged him in the face.

    I call B.S.
    I don't believe that happened as told by Forrest. He said that he learned, from the experience, to not make the alligator mad until you've crossed the river.
    To me, that concept doesn't relate to the encounter with the cowboy.
    If there's a poem-related clue or hint intended in that story, I don't know what we're supposed to learn/gain from it.
    I suppose I could do some extrapolating/stretching, and imagine that since Forrest had an alligator named Elvis, and Elvis Presley was in a movie called "Flaming
    Star" (portraying a half-breed), and singer Cher had a hit song called "Half-Breed", maybe the hint is to Cher (share). Like Jesus would have encouraged, perhaps.
    Or maybe Fenn was trying to say something clever when he said "crossed the river" (speaking of Jesus, don'tcha know). If you "cross" a river, does that mean that
    you put the river onto a cross? Or is the meaning more like adding a "cross" to the river, the way that "painting" something means to add paint to it?
    I'd like to see any ideas y'all may have about this.
    Last edited by Old Pilot; 11-15-2021, 03:16 AM.

  • #2
    Originally posted by fflegacy
    Maybe it's all in the hat. Hats off to show respect has been around for centuries and actually has its origins from the days of the Roman Empire. A Knight, or soldier would remove their helmet to show they were in the presence of friends and those whom they respected. If one did not remove their helmet in such a situation it drew suspicion and many time led to conflict.
    I don't think a hat was mentioned in the cowboy story.

    Comment


    • #3
      Never take folk you think are friends for granted, especially those living on a high horse.

      That's why I take anything f says with a pinch of salt.

      Comment


      • #4
        Old Pilot Someone needs to whip that cowboy for punching a kid. I had to stop wearing hats indoors, no reason to rain or sun. I might get a stetson, it's still hot as hell in Houston.
        Last edited by JustFred; 11-15-2021, 07:09 AM.

        Comment


        • #5
          cowboy across the street
          https://youtu.be/-aOyAvbj2Fg

          Comment


          • #6
            Broken arrow Does Wonder Woman know you found her lasso?

            Comment


            • #7
              https://youtu.be/zKQprrk7bZY Bout to go clock in. Hope y'all enjoy a beautiful day today.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Old Pilot View Post
                In Forrest's story, he was a young boy, sitting at home (perhaps on his front porch or similar place) when a man riding a horse came by. Forrest greeted him with a called-out "Hiya, Cowboy" (or something similar/equivalent), upon which the man stopped his horse, dismounted, and without speaking to Forrest, walked over to Forrest, and slugged him in the face.

                I call B.S.
                I don't believe that happened as told by Forrest. He said that he learned, from the experience, to not make the alligator mad until you've crossed the river.
                To me, that concept doesn't relate to the encounter with the cowboy.
                If there's a poem-related clue or hint intended in that story, I don't know what we're supposed to learn/gain from it.
                I suppose I could do some extrapolating/stretching, and imagine that since Forrest had an alligator named Elvis, and Elvis Presley was in a movie called "Flaming
                Star" (portraying a half-breed), and singer Cher had a hit song called "Half-Breed", maybe the hint is to Cher (share). Like Jesus would have encouraged, perhaps.
                Or maybe Fenn was trying to say something clever when he said "crossed the river" (speaking of Jesus, don'tcha know). If you "cross" a river, does that mean that
                you put the river onto a cross? Or is the meaning more like adding a "cross" to the river, the way that "painting" something means to add paint to it?
                I'd like to see any ideas y'all may have about this.
                i doubt it had anything at all to do with learning to keep ur big mouth shut when ur sposed to...f shoulda kicked him in the nuts

                Comment


                • #9
                  That was the first rule he made for himself - then followed 108 more.
                  Sounds like he got his nose "bloodied" many times throughout his lifetime.
                  Boils down to just one rule tho.....

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Maybe there was no intent for the cowboy to harm Forrest. Maybe the cowboy was just mad from sitting in the saddle for so long, so he had to take out his frustrations on something. Forrest was probably in the wrong place at the right time and simply got X in the eye. Eye'd bet his eye was three times as black as normal. Those cowboys pack a punch.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      the one rule -
                      seeing as how it's almost turkey day, I'd say -
                      it's all in the dressing.....

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Now daze that wood B child abuse. No you can't buy my daughter. #themtoo

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          If you get slammed in the face you could try to put some ice on it, as a relief. It will feel less warmer.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            A better rule of thumb is to not make the alligator mad, period. They carry a grudge a long time. Get across the river, turn around and stick your tongue out at the gator, and he'll just be waiting right there when you come back. Who knows? The kid Forrest might have been thinking he was Hopalong Cassidy and waved his Daisy BB gun at the cowboy and said "Hiya!" Mighta conveniently left that part out when he explained to his dad how he got the shiner.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Old Pilot View Post
                              In Forrest's story, he was a young boy, sitting at home (perhaps on his front porch or similar place) when a man riding a horse came by. Forrest greeted him with a called-out "Hiya, Cowboy" (or something similar/equivalent), upon which the man stopped his horse, dismounted, and without speaking to Forrest, walked over to Forrest, and slugged him in the face.

                              I call B.S.
                              I don't believe that happened as told by Forrest. He said that he learned, from the experience, to not make the alligator mad until you've crossed the river.
                              To me, that concept doesn't relate to the encounter with the cowboy.
                              If there's a poem-related clue or hint intended in that story, I don't know what we're supposed to learn/gain from it.
                              I suppose I could do some extrapolating/stretching, and imagine that since Forrest had an alligator named Elvis, and Elvis Presley was in a movie called "Flaming
                              Star" (portraying a half-breed), and singer Cher had a hit song called "Half-Breed", maybe the hint is to Cher (share). Like Jesus would have encouraged, perhaps.
                              Or maybe Fenn was trying to say something clever when he said "crossed the river" (speaking of Jesus, don'tcha know). If you "cross" a river, does that mean that
                              you put the river onto a cross? Or is the meaning more like adding a "cross" to the river, the way that "painting" something means to add paint to it?
                              I'd like to see any ideas y'all may have about this.
                              Lol

                              Wrong movie broooooother.

                              kid Galahad is the one you’re looking for.
                              good day mate!

                              where country/ folk hero Elvis went from turning wrenching to punching ppl in thier face.

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