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What was the Blaze?

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  • #16
    @Cary......are you really serious, you now think the 'blaze' is a fishing lure ? For the love of G, how does this idea make ANY sense ?
    Like OP, I'm really exasperated with attempting to guide you in the correct direction. In one final attempt, can I refer you back to
    Fenn's quote concerning removal of the blaze, paraphrasing, he said, " the blaze could be removed, but it wouldn't be practical to do so"
    I will confirm this WAS/IS part of Fenn's 85% of 'truths', so please take note; the blaze ISN'T a small, easily transportable item, PERIOD !

    FISHING LURE = WRONG !!!

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Cary_Galloway View Post
      Conclusion: I think it was something like a fishing lure
      I am not convinced of your conclusion.
      Forrest Fenn about the blaze on September 26, 2014:
      "While it’s not impossible to remove the blaze it isn’t feasible to try, and I am certain it’s still there"

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      • #18
        The blaze is something that was made, at least in part. Forrest emailed dal asking others to stop marking trees, or putting stuff out there as blazes, as it may be confused with what he did. So I think the blaze is natural, but somehow he did something to make it a blaze.

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        • #19
          After no place for the meek you reach 'the end is ever drawing nigh'. This corresponds to Marias Pass in Glacier Park. There will be no paddle up your creek means you do not continue along the path as you have been. The problem with that is there is only one road, so this is where you need to use imagination. But there are signs saying that you are at the Continental Divide so it's not hard to put 2 and 2 together. The Continental Divide is the blaze.

          https://www.google.com/maps/@48.3166...7i13312!8i6656

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          • #20
            "I guess my parachute is still hanging in that tree where I left it."

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            • #21
              After a little thought, the best I can make of 'fishing lure' is:

              Fenn was FISHING for certain individuals & the LURE was the trove.....that's all folks !

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              • #22
                Originally posted by steve66 View Post

                I am not convinced of your conclusion.
                Forrest Fenn about the blaze on September 26, 2014:
                "While it’s not impossible to remove the blaze it isn’t feasible to try, and I am certain it’s still there"
                I agree. That "isn't feasible to try" statement doesn't line up with my conclusion at all.

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                • #23
                  The Blaze is/was a media company founded by Glenn Beck. Whether that refers to the same Blaze as f's poem is improbable, but Glenn Beck did run a gag where he convinced people there was an underground amusement park. He gave people directions over his radio show but nobody could find it because it didn't exist. That has nothing to do with the Chase however, you can't possibly draw parallels between the two. It would be impossible.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Cary_Galloway View Post
                    Jack on FF's reaction to the damaged blaze:


                    Jack's Mysterious writings response:


                    what caught me most about this was it seemed like the blaze was tiny. "It took slow and methodical effort on the ground to find."
                    and it also seemed like the blaze was an object: The blaze and the treasure were out in the elements
                    just the way that is worded makes it seem like an object instead of part of the environment. Part of the environment to me would be a mark on a rock, mark on a tree, etc.


                    Jack on fake blazes. This would be after he encountered the fake blaze:


                    I think it wasn't a mark on a tree.

                    Conclusion:
                    I think it was something like a fishing lure: "Helped by logic, my experience on the ground at the location, and a hint in the book"
                    it would be logical to use a fishing lure to as the blaze in this fishing area. A mark on a tree would be hard because of the lodge pole trees were very thin. Rocks would be to obvious. And a lure would be tiny which would take "It took slow and methodical effort on the ground to find."
                    It would also be very poetic and fitting for Forrest Fenn, a fisherman, to lure us with an actual fishing lure. How much did he talk about fishing in his books and interviews?
                    Cary_Galloway - Here's the blaze.

                    Click image for larger version

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                    It stood out so much that it blended in for searchers and non-searchers alike.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by 93cruiser View Post
                      The blaze is something that was made, at least in part. Forrest emailed dal asking others to stop marking trees, or putting stuff out there as blazes, as it may be confused with what he did. So I think the blaze is natural, but somehow he did something to make it a blaze.
                      He assigned it the "role" of being the blaze. He didn't have to alter it or even go there (and neither will the successful finder).

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                      • #26
                        Was there an email or Q&A by Jack where he said if he told what the blaze was it would give away too much of the story or location or something like that? I can't find where/if he said that.

                        A mark on a rock or a carved F on a tree wouldn't give much away in terms of location or story, but a fishing lure would. We would logically know it was probably near his most cherished fishing hole. Jack said logic did help figure out what the blaze was.

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                        • #27
                          I still believe that ff used definitions of words in the poem to convey a few ideas. There are so many synonyms.

                          For example, I’m reading a novel, and just came across a passage about a ‘burn’ coming down the hillside. What? As it turns out, a ‘burn’ can be a spring or fountain.

                          Perhaps the blaze is a spring or fountain.

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                          • #28
                            Early morning thot -
                            Forrest began his day, before breakfast, by going to the barn to milk ole Bessie
                            but first, he had to find his stool.....

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Lady V View Post
                              I still believe that ff used definitions of words in the poem to convey a few ideas. There are so many synonyms.

                              For example, I’m reading a novel, and just came across a passage about a ‘burn’ coming down the hillside. What? As it turns out, a ‘burn’ can be a spring or fountain.

                              Perhaps the blaze is a spring or fountain.
                              Are you referring to a novel like Catcher in The Rye?
                              CITR is named for a poem by Robert Burns, the national poet of Scotland. I like this idea, since to Robert Burns, a Burn is a stream or river. The word Burn is used to denote a stream primarily in Northern England, Ireland and Scotland. A creek. A vernal brook. Watercourse. Trail. The Southern English equivalent is Bourn(e). Irish is more often Byrne. In only one language I know, it means explicitly "Spring or Fountain". In German, the meaning ascribed to "Born", is "wellspring, quelle or source" (usually in the sense of birth, inspiration or origin). The modern word Bahn (as in Autobahn) preserves this original idea of a stream and it evolved through contextual use to mean "road". The city of Bonn, for example, was named by the Romans for it's proximity to the Rhine River, which they used as a "highway" to penetrate the German interior back in the days of Germanicus, Caligula's father. The word was their interpretation of what their local German allies called the Rhine, and it sounded to them like Bonn or Bern which is probably the origin of those city names. In French, "Born" retains some (phonetic) connection to these ideas. The game Mille Bornes, called "Canasta of the Road" originally in French, refers to the kilometer-spaced mile marking stones called "Bornes" (roughly "Milestones"), and the MIlle (1000), referring to the thousand kilometer distance of the the old Roman road from Paris to the Italian border which in modern times is called Route Nationale 7. Some of these "Bornes" are ancient, and are actually the originals from the old Roman road. They're in England too. I digress.

                              Now get back to solvin', 'ya feckin' manky gits.
                              I'm goin' to the jacks, to take a gypsy's kiss.
                              Last edited by Sirius B; 11-15-2021, 01:59 PM.

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                              • #30
                                The blaze is what happens when "it" meets with "heavy loads" in a rather abrupt way.

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