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Why we will never know the answer

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  • #31
    Originally posted by JEffjeFF View Post

    You have a point there. Serial numbers scratched out with rusty scissors. That's a blaze for ya.
    I would absolutely go remove it after I took a bath with my new treasure though, out of respect for the woods.
    That's funny!
    Rub a dub dub.....

    Comment


    • #32
      Originally posted by sally

      Physiologically, when the heart is dissected and extruded it actually looks like a rope with a "knot".

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aKXAN-bcwRo

      I love the weather along the front range. Especially when the big clouds bloom. I used to sit on top of the pump house and watch the clouds whirl above me. God is in the rain.

      Show me your kneecap and I'l show you my skyhat.

      https://youtu.be/C1AR9K4lRFo

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      • #33
        Originally posted by In My Opinion View Post
        I think Forrest said a child could figure it out because he was writing from a perspective of when he was a child and the joy he got growing up around his family and all the family vacations and working as fishing guides.
        In My Opinion A child at school learns the alphabet and numbers such as ABC and 123, a simple cipher.

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        • #34
          My two cents worth. Jack did not solve the puzzle the way Fenn intended by following the poem to it s conclusion. My strong belief is that there were two parts to this puzzle, the poem location leads to a place in Colorado. Her something was buried and in it was your final instructions of where to locate the chest proper. The chest itself could well have been somewhere in Wyoming and Jack was given insider knowledge of its general area, but not precise as Fenn's would have been. Hence 25 determined visits convinced it was the right location.. Not one of us would have stuck it out that long with all those trips. It stinks..

          Comment


          • #35
            Originally posted by Cuppajoe View Post
            I’ll predicate this by stating that this hypothesis is based on my belief that the treasure was found in a national park- likely Yellowstone. So if you don’t believe that’s possible, move along. Nothing to see here.
            Also, I’m not a lawyer. I think I’ve got the legal implications right but I’d certainly defer to a higher authority.
            The implications of finding the treasure in a NP have been discussed at length here. This post is about why I believe that discussion was incomplete, why the problem is far more complex, and how that explains much of what has gone on since Jack came forward..
            To briefly summarize past discussion, Forrest violated the Code of Federal Regulations by abandoning property. Jack violated the Code by failing to turn over the property to the superintendent “as soon as practicable”
            Jack could have turned it over. It seems pretty likely it would have been returned based on the wording in the Code. He could have just bolted, claimed ignorance, and hashed it out with the Parks services later. Riskier, but I think still likely to be decided in Jack’s favor
            Instead, he left the treasure for a day, then went back and retrieved it! Whether you believe he actually did this or not isn’t relevant.
            Why did Jack choose this tactic? I can think of no other reason than to circumvent the found property rule by having Forrest give him title to the gold. Seems like a reasonable ploy at first blush. It’s now Jack’s to do with as he pleases.
            But there is a huge problem with this approach. I believe the change of ownership would fail as a legal argument for not turning in the treasure. And if it fails something really really bad just happened. Jack and Forrest knew the rules. Jack and Forrest communicated. Jack and Forrest engaged in conspiracy to commit a crime. And the crime they committed is defrauding the federal govt out of a potential claim of ownership of the treasure. That is a felony. A relatively minor infraction has turned into a serious federal offense. How do you suppose that plays out in court?
            Of course there is speculation here, but how else do you account for Jack’s story?
            This explains why Jack is having trouble selling the chest. He can’t reveal the location, probably not ever. The value of the chest is diminished without a solve and further diminished if a buyer is leery of the legal uncertainty.
            it explains Forrest’s odd behavior at the end. It explains Jack’s silence after the condor revelation. And if I’m right, we will likely never know the solution. I hope I’m wrong, so please poke some holes in this.
            This is why you start out with a false assumption and base everything around it. The first thing Forrest says is private land when listing what type of land. People read about the bells and jars and turned that into things they thought Forrest said about the chest. They joined the chase and ran to Yellowstone, I did the same thing, at some point, you realize Forrest was never going to point to the place he put the chest. He said there were hints in TTOTC so having a chapter In Love with Yellowstone in itself tells you it was never there. If you are not going to trust Forrest, just say there was no chest. Or trust everything he said and deal with the truth.

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            • #36
              Jack could have sold the treasure for 60 cents on the dollar to private underground buyers. Illegally of course, but making it tax-free.
              We will see if him going the legal route nets him more or less gain.

              Comment


              • #37
                Originally posted by djjmciv View Post
                Jack could have sold the treasure for 60 cents on the dollar to private underground buyers. Illegally of course, but making it tax-free.
                We will see if him going the legal route nets him more or less gain.
                Jack will never sell it, and there will never be a Heritage auction of the chest and its contents. Read into that what you will.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by Zapster View Post

                  Jack will never sell it, and there will never be a Heritage auction of the chest and its contents. Read into that what you will.
                  Zap - What is your theory? Is it that Jack doesn’t legally own it, or something else?

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by starwheel View Post
                    My two cents worth. Jack did not solve the puzzle the way Fenn intended by following the poem to it s conclusion. My strong belief is that there were two parts to this puzzle, the poem location leads to a place in Colorado. Her something was buried and in it was your final instructions of where to locate the chest proper. The chest itself could well have been somewhere in Wyoming and Jack was given insider knowledge of its general area, but not precise as Fenn's would have been. Hence 25 determined visits convinced it was the right location.. Not one of us would have stuck it out that long with all those trips. It stinks..
                    That number of trips would have made any one of us mad. O f course, mad also translates into crazy and pretty much describes any one of us here. I guess you could say, it comes with the show. And if you're gullible enough to believe that, I have tickets to a horse show starring Fenn's doll, Chaos, if anyone wants to buy them.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Longfellow View Post

                      Zap - What is your theory? Is it that Jack doesn’t legally own it, or something else?
                      Longfellow The most sensible explanation I've been able to come up with is that Forrest bought the chest back from "Jack." Would explain the lack of any known sale of the chest or any of its contents in the last 27 months, the lack of any recent pictures of the treasure, and would also answer the mail on Jack's apparent desire to use the proceeds of a treasure sale in a timely fashion to help pay off college debts and not be encumbered by additional possessions. Would also explain why Jack transported the treasure all the way to New Mexico -- he had no intention of keeping it, and Forrest was the one person he could sell it to and remain anonymous. Still have no idea why he unnecessarily outted himself. No lawyer or judge could ever have forced him to reveal his identity.

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Originally posted by Knight
                        Perhaps there is no answer. An answer is the ending not the pursuit of knowledge. Perhaps Forrest wanted to open our minds to possibilities, not to banalities. I've always had a theory that all good stories are algebraic. The listener must solve for X but the story does not have to. If I write that Marjorie woke up with morning sickness, you solve for X and know that she is pregnant. But I never said it, I only showed a situation in which pregnancy was the solve. Perhaps the poem is like that. Nine clews that lead... on. How much of it you care to uncover is the measure of how thrilled you are by learning. There are worse things to create than an open-ended learning machine. You got a free degree in Fennology. Nobody said a diploma guaranteed a job.
                        -

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by Zapster View Post

                          Longfellow The most sensible explanation I've been able to come up with is that Forrest bought the chest back from "Jack." Would explain the lack of any known sale of the chest or any of its contents in the last 27 months, the lack of any recent pictures of the treasure, and would also answer the mail on Jack's apparent desire to use the proceeds of a treasure sale in a timely fashion to help pay off college debts and not be encumbered by additional possessions. Would also explain why Jack transported the treasure all the way to New Mexico -- he had no intention of keeping it, and Forrest was the one person he could sell it to and remain anonymous. Still have no idea why he unnecessarily outted himself. No lawyer or judge could ever have forced him to reveal his identity.
                          Zapster I cannot say I disagree. I have also thought that is an entirely feasible scenario. If true, I agree Jack's voluntary "outting" doesn't really make sense.

                          Some other thoughts that have crossed my mind:
                          • I believe the idea of someone in the next millenium finding a treasure with a copy of Fenn's autobiography and DNA material was a very compelling desire of Forrest's. He's not the kind of guy to leave things to chance if he truly wants them to happen. What if he hid two such troves and told no one (two people can keep a secret......)? If he did such a thing, there might be some evidence of it in the poem...like the plurals "treasures," or "riches," or "new and old." The "new" being the one potentially found during Forrest's limited post-hide lifespan and the "old" being the one he never talked about, to be notionally found 1,000 years in the future. After the first treasure is retrieved, and publicly announced, the present generation stops looking. The second is safe to be discovered in the next millenium, or beyond. I truly believe that Forrest wanted to be a "mummy joe," to be discovered in the future and become a part of the dance of history in that very unique way.
                          • Also what if, like you propose, Forrest bought the chest back but with the further intent of hiding it again for the same reason (discovery in the distant future).
                          Just a couple of what ifs. I’m partial to my first scenario; the puzzle still compels me. Thanks for your reply to my query.
                          Last edited by Longfellow; 09-29-2022, 10:12 PM.

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Longfellow w ​​​and Zapster
                            Hey,
                            These scenarios mean accepting what we have been told regarding the location of the hidey-hole without it being substantiated.

                            If we accept Forrest's logic, then we should know the answer to Forrest's riddle to accept any derived speculations about where he hid his chest. His quote:
                            The most common mistake that I see searchers make is that they underestimate the importance of the first clue. If you don’t have that one nailed down you might as well stay home and play Canasta.f

                            Accepting speculations without satisfying "what the first clue is," is unreasonable given the lack of the answer to this riddle. Cheers

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Originally posted by trueyeti View Post
                              The most common mistake that I see searchers make is that they underestimate the importance of the first clue. If you don’t have that one nailed down you might as well stay home and play Canasta.f
                              His best advice he gave.

                              Without COD Airport / Veteran's Mem. Park, you wouldn't have:

                              -the theme for the poem

                              -a flightpath you otherwise couldn't follow by road

                              -a blaze (and crew) which relate unmistakenly back to the first clue

                              -a way of entombing himself for future generations to 'marvel' and point their fingers at

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Originally posted by Longfellow View Post

                                Zapster I cannot say I disagree. I have also thought that is an entirely feasible scenario. If true, I agree Jack's voluntary "outting" doesn't really make sense.

                                Some other thoughts that have crossed my mind:
                                • I believe the idea of someone in the next millenium finding a treasure with a copy of Fenn's autobiography and DNA material was a very compelling desire of Forrest's. He's not the kind of guy to leave things to chance if he truly wants them to happen. What if he hid two such troves and told no one (two people can keep a secret......)? If he did such a thing, there might be some evidence of it in the poem...like the plurals "treasures," or "riches," or "new and old." The "new" being the one potentially found during Forrest's limited post-hide lifespan and the "old" being the one he never talked about, to be notionally found 1,000 years in the future. After the first treasure is retrieved, and publicly announced, the present generation stops looking. The second is safe to be discovered in the next millenium, or beyond. I truly believe that Forrest wanted to be a "mummy joe," to be discovered in the future and become a part of the dance of history in that very unique way.
                                • Forrest certainly was interested in legacy -- leaving a long-lasting mark, affecting distant future folks not yet born. Not too surprising in light of his reverance for ancient cultures. So it wouldn't seem that a mere 10-year treasure hunt from start to finish would have satisfied his desire for a degree of immortality.
                                • Also what if, like you propose, Forrest bought the chest back but with the further intent of hiding it again for the same reason (discovery in the distant future).
                              Just a couple of what ifs. I’m partial to my first scenario; the puzzle still compels me. Thanks for your reply to my query.
                              All are possibilities, but in my opinion there was only ever one treasure chest, so your second scenario might be the more likely of the two. But I think more likely than either is that the whole thing is over other than the mystery of the solution. And perhaps that's the mystery Forrest most cared about preserving.

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