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  • #31
    Originally posted by Old Pilot View Post

    If you insult people by telling them what you think they meant, you could lose popularity points (that is, if you have any left to lose).
    That's one reason I'm not going to go on and on and on and on about your last digit. Hee hee!
    Why would you need to go on about the digit '5'........it IS the correct number, it's just NOT been rounded up (58 to 6), that's all (ho,ho !).
    Bear in mind, 'pi' never said his decimal username had been rounded up (or down ,for that matter) !
    I had the impression you were more mathematically aware, @OP !

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    • #32
      Originally posted by Old Pilot View Post

      If you insult people by telling them what you think they meant, you could lose popularity points (that is, if you have any left to lose).
      That's one reason I'm not going to go on and on and on and on about your last digit. Hee hee!
      That was not an insult. I am a direct person & did not recognize the sensitivity level here. Good to know. Thanks.
      I will tag the original poster: Sarah Seedling
      It was a statement toward understanding a prior communication by seeking confirmation because there are many phrases from foreign languages that are frequently used in verbal communications by Americans who are not actually familiar w/ the languages. Sometimes I take for granted a shared background point of information.
      That was the only logical explanation for the "Oh contrary if a group of [nine]. . ." phrase that made no sense, especially in that context.
      Apologies all around. Please accept my mea culpa.

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      • #33
        It seems to me EVERYONE is turning into a snowflake . I am surprised to see 1 of us becoming a snowflake , and i cant figure out why that is.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by CurseWordsAndTreasure
          Watcha think you’re Santa now?
          I'm me, who are u ?

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          • #35
            Originally posted by Sal O'mander View Post
            Old Pilot I think Forrest said something like " you're not going to find it on the top of a mountain, but it might be close"
            That looks familiar. Thank you for reminding us of this (another vague statement from FF).

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            • #36
              Originally posted by 3dsp1415926535 View Post

              You cannot solve them in isolation. They must integrate. An answer cannot be true for one clue w/out considering all the other clues.
              PS I believe the French phrase you wanted to use was, " au contraire. "
              When people speak French, it makes my skin crawl and I want to scratch and itch all over.
              1f Billy

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              • #37
                Originally posted by 3dsp1415926535 View Post

                That was not an insult. I am a direct person & did not recognize the sensitivity level here. Good to know. Thanks.
                I will tag the original poster: Sarah Seedling
                It was a statement toward understanding a prior communication by seeking confirmation because there are many phrases from foreign languages that are frequently used in verbal communications by Americans who are not actually familiar w/ the languages. Sometimes I take for granted a shared background point of information.
                That was the only logical explanation for the "Oh contrary if a group of [nine]. . ." phrase that made no sense, especially in that context.
                Apologies all around. Please accept my mea culpa.
                I dare ANYONE reading this to google his user name .. OMG !! Can U say Cray Cray?

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by Old Pilot View Post

                  Please forgive me for saying this, as it hardly relates to the Forrest Fenn treasure hunt. I'll try to add something that does, before I hit "Post Reply".
                  You mentioned "IT", as if it means something special to you. I'm not yet totally convinced that IT does. But since each letter was capitalized, I pronounced each one's name, and what I said sounded like "Eye Tee". This reminded me of some old cartoons I used to see on TV, featuring Sylvester (the cat) and Tweety (the little bird . . . perhaps a canary). The bird appeared quite young, and was fond of saying "I tink I tee a puddy tat." (So for the sake of attempted humor or teasing, I wanted to share this, with mild emphasis on the word "tink".) Again, my apologies are hereby offered.
                  Now, back to the hunt. "Tinker" is an old word, meaning a person who works with metals. A more modern word might be something like craftsperson or fabricator or farrier or weldor or something similar. I suppose that an artist in metals (Forrest, for example) would have also been called a tinker. This may have come from the sounds made by hammering on metal to form it into the desired shape. And I think that Forrest may have said something about his treasure being hidden somewhere near the top of a hill . . . but I could be wrong about this.
                  You make some good points. Your suggestion of a craftsperson or fabricator would be one who might use, say a hammer to strike a nail? A tinsmith who made a tin man? Or one wielding a hammer in mythology, like Thor? The Ϟ Greek Koppa, which resembles a lightning strike, that eventually became the Latin letter Q, could be part of Fenn's reason to mention Thor?
                  Would you consider "eye" as a bullseye or target image like forms of Theta? And "tea" like used for dying cloth, to turn it a light brown color?
                  Or perhaps just "T" or Tau, the 19th letter in the Greek alphabet that was derived from the Phoenician letter taw that is basically an X w/ a wider spread. Its meaning in Hebrew is mark, sign, & signature which was (is still?) recognized as a legal mark by illiterate persons in USA if witnessed.
                  Would you consider instead of the top of the mountain, that Fenn suggests half-way up, as a suitable substitution just as Fenn said he scattered Olga's ashes, maybe even where the yellow & purple flowers grow.
                  Interestingly, you also mention "tinker" as a description of Fenn, which brings to mind the John Le Carré novel Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy that is described as a labyrinth thriller about a Russian mole in the MI6. The author, who wrote under a pseudonym, lived along a mile of cliff which he owned close to Land's End.

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by 3dsp1415926535 View Post

                    You make some good points. Your suggestion of a craftsperson or fabricator would be one who might use, say a hammer to strike a nail? A tinsmith who made a tin man? Or one wielding a hammer in mythology, like Thor? The Ϟ Greek Koppa, which resembles a lightning strike, that eventually became the Latin letter Q, could be part of Fenn's reason to mention Thor?
                    Would you consider "eye" as a bullseye or target image like forms of Theta? And "tea" like used for dying cloth, to turn it a light brown color?
                    Or perhaps just "T" or Tau, the 19th letter in the Greek alphabet that was derived from the Phoenician letter taw that is basically an X w/ a wider spread. Its meaning in Hebrew is mark, sign, & signature which was (is still?) recognized as a legal mark by illiterate persons in USA if witnessed.
                    Would you consider instead of the top of the mountain, that Fenn suggests half-way up, as a suitable substitution just as Fenn said he scattered Olga's ashes, maybe even where the yellow & purple flowers grow.
                    Interestingly, you also mention "tinker" as a description of Fenn, which brings to mind the John Le Carré novel Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy that is described as a labyrinth thriller about a Russian mole in the MI6. The author, who wrote under a pseudonym, lived along a mile of cliff which he owned close to Land's End.
                    Everyone knows where lands end is at

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Sal O'mander View Post
                      Old Pilot I think Forrest said something like " you're not going to find it on the top of a mountain, but it might be close"
                      A butte mountain has no top.

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by jan_v60 View Post

                        A butte mountain has no top.
                        So whats up there on top of a butte? A hole?

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by Chester Retriever View Post
                          So whats up there on top of a butte? A hole?
                          A flat surface. But not a real top. (And there can be holes in it, of course, especially rabitholes )
                          Wiktionary
                          butte, Noun
                          1. an isolated hill with steep sides and a flat top
                          Last edited by jan_v60; 10-16-2021, 03:31 PM.

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