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  • #16
    Mirror Plateau

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    • #17
      Is it possible to look down and see what is above you?
      Ima thinkin you can....

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      • #18
        Click image for larger version

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        • #19
          Forrest chose to end too far to walk with "mirror on my wall" and a picture of him looking at his reflection in a mirror, so I think it likely has some importance, at least in Forrest's eyes.
          As far as how a mirror may relate to the poem itself, I think of TS Eliot quote about the end of all our exploring will be to arrive where we started and know the place for the first time. So maybe the end location (last clue) is reflective of the beginning location (first clue) in the poem. In other words, "look quickly down, your quest to cease" is likely a mirror image, a reflection of "where warm waters halt," in more ways than one.

          But I think a much larger scale, long-term world view emerges from the concept of a mirror, as it relates to the idea of self-reflection and introspection. I think Forrest was a very introspective person, and think he shares with us some of his views about life that came about as a result of his "looking at the man in the mirror." In preface of TTOTC, Forrest says "My only goal in this endeavor is to talk about a few of my life experiences and if any readers over the age of twelve don't see a little of themselves in this mirror, then maybe they deserve another turn." One of Forrest's life views becomes clear in the My War for Me chapter- try to be a positive influence to all you come in contact with. "So, to be important I only need to impress myself. And I can do that if others are positively affected by what they see in me or see me do." (TTOTC page 102) And "If I cannot enrich those with whom I interact each day and cause them to be better for my having passed their view, then I have wasted my turn." (page 103). I know Forrest has been a positive influence on so many people in the Chase, and has no doubt enriched the lives of numerous folks outside of the Chase he has come in contact with.
          Another thing I learned from Forrest and am trying to put into practice: forgive a sinner, ask for forgiveness, and smile at a homely girl. Simple yet profound call to be nice and friendly to others, be humble enough to ask for forgiveness, and willing to forgive others when you have been wronged.

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          • #20
            Maybe, if the blaze shows a direction, one should mirror the blaze to find the correct direction to the hiding spot. I did not yet try this out. Have to make a choice around which axis I should mirror.
            Last edited by jan_v60; 10-11-2021, 02:00 PM.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Old Pilot View Post
              Forrest apparently was quite interested in mirrors, it seems. Maybe I'm mis-interpreting what he wrote . . . but am still trying to find any connection between mirror(s) and this treasure hunt -- perhaps more specifically, the poem itself. I saw a drawing that shows an old man looking in a mirror and seeing a "young" reflection of himself, but this doesn't give me any marvelous new insight into Forrest, his life, or his thoughts.

              People sometimes use the phrase "reflect on" or "reflect upon" to mean "remember". I believe that Forrest spent a good amount of time remembering (and thinking about) things he had done. Perhaps there were some feelings of guilt in play during some of these "remembering" sessions. This may be typical and not unusual for anyone who has lived a fairly long time. Who doesn't have regrets? But it doesn't make a lot of sense to me to dwell too long in guilt, since we can't undo the past. I do think it's a little strange that anyone might think that leaving a trove in the Rocky Mountains will much change the life of someone in Asia who was orphaned or injured by a U.S.A.F. bombing run. No, I don't know whether Forrest ever contributed money to any orphanages in that part of the world.

              Regarding the physical phenomenon of a mirror reflecting light, I can imagine seeing an image (using pareidolia) that resembles part of an insect. And that kind of insect, in particular, seems to be associated with freedom (perhaps freedom from care/worry in particular, although generally insects are prey at times). And I read a very obscure short written piece about a reflection in water. I have even looked for that piece so I could read it again and note where I saw it. It was online, and is not easy to find. But it seems to provide an important hint or clue in solving the poem.

              For anyone who thinks that reflection (i.e., with a mirror) relates importantly to introspection, I'd like to see what you have to say about that. It might tie in pretty well with some of Forrest's ideas when he created this treasure hunt. Thanks for reading. As always, all part of my opinion.
              my mom was always worrying about crows feet, but i may have missed the point of your post...about mirrors

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              • #22
                Originally posted by jan_v60 View Post
                Maybe, if the blaze shows a direction, one should mirror the blaze to find the correct direction to the hiding spot. I did not yet try this out. Have to make a choice around which axis I should mirror.
                Maybe the blaze is the mirror.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by wwwamericana View Post
                  Is it possible to look down and see what is above you?
                  Ima thinkin you can....
                  Water you talking about?

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Old Pilot View Post
                    Forrest apparently was quite interested in mirrors, it seems. Maybe I'm mis-interpreting what he wrote . . . but am still trying to find any connection between mirror(s) and this treasure hunt -- perhaps more specifically, the poem itself. I saw a drawing that shows an old man looking in a mirror and seeing a "young" reflection of himself, but this doesn't give me any marvelous new insight into Forrest, his life, or his thoughts.

                    People sometimes use the phrase "reflect on" or "reflect upon" to mean "remember". I believe that Forrest spent a good amount of time remembering (and thinking about) things he had done. Perhaps there were some feelings of guilt in play during some of these "remembering" sessions. This may be typical and not unusual for anyone who has lived a fairly long time. Who doesn't have regrets? But it doesn't make a lot of sense to me to dwell too long in guilt, since we can't undo the past. I do think it's a little strange that anyone might think that leaving a trove in the Rocky Mountains will much change the life of someone in Asia who was orphaned or injured by a U.S.A.F. bombing run. No, I don't know whether Forrest ever contributed money to any orphanages in that part of the world.

                    Regarding the physical phenomenon of a mirror reflecting light, I can imagine seeing an image (using pareidolia) that resembles part of an insect. And that kind of insect, in particular, seems to be associated with freedom (perhaps freedom from care/worry in particular, although generally insects are prey at times). And I read a very obscure short written piece about a reflection in water. I have even looked for that piece so I could read it again and note where I saw it. It was online, and is not easy to find. But it seems to provide an important hint or clue in solving the poem.

                    For anyone who thinks that reflection (i.e., with a mirror) relates importantly to introspection, I'd like to see what you have to say about that. It might tie in pretty well with some of Forrest's ideas when he created this treasure hunt. Thanks for reading. As always, all part of my opinion.
                    Read the poem backwards. Using a mirror.
                    You will find the last clue that way and verification.......I WON!...
                    Im not the winner though. LOL

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by moveslikejagger View Post
                      Forrest chose to end too far to walk with "mirror on my wall" and a picture of him looking at his reflection in a mirror, so I think it likely has some importance, at least in Forrest's eyes.
                      As far as how a mirror may relate to the poem itself, I think of TS Eliot quote about the end of all our exploring will be to arrive where we started and know the place for the first time. So maybe the end location (last clue) is reflective of the beginning location (first clue) in the poem. In other words, "look quickly down, your quest to cease" is likely a mirror image, a reflection of "where warm waters halt," in more ways than one.

                      But I think a much larger scale, long-term world view emerges from the concept of a mirror, as it relates to the idea of self-reflection and introspection. I think Forrest was a very introspective person, and think he shares with us some of his views about life that came about as a result of his "looking at the man in the mirror." In preface of TTOTC, Forrest says "My only goal in this endeavor is to talk about a few of my life experiences and if any readers over the age of twelve don't see a little of themselves in this mirror, then maybe they deserve another turn." One of Forrest's life views becomes clear in the My War for Me chapter- try to be a positive influence to all you come in contact with. "So, to be important I only need to impress myself. And I can do that if others are positively affected by what they see in me or see me do." (TTOTC page 102) And "If I cannot enrich those with whom I interact each day and cause them to be better for my having passed their view, then I have wasted my turn." (page 103). I know Forrest has been a positive influence on so many people in the Chase, and has no doubt enriched the lives of numerous folks outside of the Chase he has come in contact with.
                      Another thing I learned from Forrest and am trying to put into practice: forgive a sinner, ask for forgiveness, and smile at a homely girl. Simple yet profound call to be nice and friendly to others, be humble enough to ask for forgiveness, and willing to forgive others when you have been wronged.
                      I think you're on it here. The mirrors are more about "the answers I already know" than about "my secret where."

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                      • #26
                        Click image for larger version

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Views:	125
Size:	2.74 MB
ID:	348154

                        source: The Bomber Mountain Crash Story: A Wyoming Mystery: Madsen, R. Scott: 9780962466502: Books - Amazon.ca

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by wwwamericana View Post
                          Is it possible to look down and see what is above you?
                          Ima thinkin you can....
                          Yes -- both. (I'm only speaking for myself.)
                          Last edited by Old Pilot; 10-20-2021, 10:03 PM.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Old Pilot View Post

                            Yes . . . in some cases, it's possible.
                            Like when you are hanging upside down?

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