Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Cary Grant coincidences

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Originally posted by Vertigo View Post
    Pony Ault left the room with Cary Grant in close trail; Forrest Fenn searchers spent a decade looking for a word that is key.

    Click image for larger version Name:	NotoriousKey1.jpg Views:	8 Size:	1.17 MB ID:	341497

    Click image for larger version Name:	NotoriousKey2.jpg Views:	8 Size:	1.20 MB ID:	341498

    Click image for larger version Name:	NotoriousKey3.jpg Views:	8 Size:	2.66 MB ID:	341499

    DISCLAIMER: This post is for entertainment purposes only. It will not help you solve Forrest Fenn's poem. Any connection between "Notorious" and "Vertigo" is purely coincidental. User is not associated with RKO Radio Pictures, or Alfred J. Hitchcock Productions. Cary Grant (1904-1986) and Ingrid Bergman (1915-1982) were paid actors.
    Both very good movies (Notorious and Vertigo).
    Movies are fascinating in their hidden or open references.
    For example, and totally unrelated to the Chase as far as I know, there's a famous scene in Tom Hank's "You've got Mail" that is directly tied to Jimmy Stewart's "The Shop Around The Corner", which the first was inspired by.
    It's the coffee house scene:
    You've Got Mail version: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hhHh-O8bf_A
    Shop Around The Corner version: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=olPRltvR89c
    Updated, of course.

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by Vertigo View Post
      Pony Ault left the room with Cary Grant in close trail; Forrest Fenn searchers spent a decade looking for a word that is key.

      Click image for larger version Name:	NotoriousKey1.jpg Views:	8 Size:	1.17 MB ID:	341497

      Click image for larger version Name:	NotoriousKey2.jpg Views:	8 Size:	1.20 MB ID:	341498

      Click image for larger version Name:	NotoriousKey3.jpg Views:	8 Size:	2.66 MB ID:	341499

      DISCLAIMER: This post is for entertainment purposes only. It will not help you solve Forrest Fenn's poem. Any connection between "Notorious" and "Vertigo" is purely coincidental. User is not associated with RKO Radio Pictures, or Alfred J. Hitchcock Productions. Cary Grant (1904-1986) and Ingrid Bergman (1915-1982) were paid actors.
      You are correct. Have you read MacDonald's The Golden Key?
      Also, RKO Radio Pictures & Hitchcock are hints/threads of similar knowledge connecting hints i.e. hits.

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by Sherif Billy View Post
        Now that does it. I'm not telling Stan where that spot is.
        1f Billy
        Are you referring to Stanley Kubrick (as in "the dawn of man" scene), or Stanley Livingston(e)?

        Comment


        • #19
          The Thrill of the Chase (spectrummagazine.org)

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by Walker View Post

            Both very good movies (Notorious and Vertigo).
            Movies are fascinating in their hidden or open references.
            For example, and totally unrelated to the Chase as far as I know, there's a famous scene in Tom Hank's "You've got Mail" that is directly tied to Jimmy Stewart's "The Shop Around The Corner", which the first was inspired by.
            It's the coffee house scene:
            You've Got Mail version: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hhHh-O8bf_A
            Shop Around The Corner version: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=olPRltvR89c
            Updated, of course.
            Interesting, thanks for the links. No offense to Hanks and Ryan, but Stewart and Sullavan win that battle, hands down, in my opinion.

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by Vertigo View Post

              Interesting, thanks for the links. No offense to Hanks and Ryan, but Stewart and Sullavan win that battle, hands down, in my opinion.
              Well, that's a tough one to call. I would rate "You've Got Mail" as the better movie though. It had more of what they did so well, between the two. But both are highly entertaining and fun.
              Speaking of great acting, my daughter and I watched "His Girl Friday" (Cary Grant) together because of the old fashioned style of acting. I wanted her to see one scene in particular.
              It was a very long scene, with multiple actors that all had to have their lines and their timing perfect. It amazes me how those people could perform like that so well, without cutting tape and all to cover up mistakes like they do these days. Like a live stage performance.

              Off topic personal experience...
              As a kid I didn't appreciate acting and stage performances.
              But my senior year in high school, something changed all of that.
              It was the "senior class play" that included juniors (smallish school).
              My sister was a year younger than me and was in it. During rehearsals they realized they had something special. They were doing "The Music Man."
              A girl in my class, who was so shy that no one really knew her, got the lead lady's role. She wasn't pretty, very quiet, very shy.
              But boy could she sing. She shocked us all. Talk about an ugly duckling turning into a swan.
              News got out before the first performance and spread to towns and cities all around. They were sold out of all the performances before the first opening curtain.
              I got a ticket and went, and wow! I was amazed at what they did. The leading man was a friend from my sister's class and on the football team with me. And he also knocked it out of the ballpark.
              The whole performance was outstanding. And that was when I learned to appreciate acting.

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by Knowledge

                Fox books if I recall was in You've got mail
                I love that movie,it shows you can like and love the same person.
                So many people do not like the person they love. I do now how crazy that sounds.
                Well, they're just confusing love with something else.
                Fox Books, yes, I didn't catch that. Coincidences everywhere, it seems.

                Comment


                • #23
                  My previous post may have left readers with a question:
                  If "notorious" is the word that is key, what is the takeaway?
                  Take away "I, not us" and you're left with "oro" (gold).
                  No wonder the poem begins, "As I have gone alone in there"

                  Incidentally, the key and lock in "Notorious" are labeled "Unica"

                  Click image for larger version  Name:	HitchcockKey.jpg Views:	0 Size:	80.6 KB ID:	341836

                  DISCLAIMER: This post is for entertainment and education purposes only. It will not help you solve Forrest Fenn's poem.
                  Any connection between "Hitchcock" or "Hitch" and the place where warm waters "halt" is purely coincidental.
                  Last edited by Vertigo; 09-26-2021, 04:18 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Not4but242Walk View Post
                    On a scale of 1 to 10 (10 being the best), how would you rate that article?

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Old Pilot View Post

                      On a scale of 1 to 10 (10 being the best), how would you rate that article?
                      There was an article?

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Old Pilot View Post

                        Are you referring to Stanley Kubrick (as in "the dawn of man" scene), or Stanley Livingston(e)?
                        Yeah...You got it..Mr. Kubrick. No actually...I was thinking of Rachel Welch in "The Planet of the Apes". Dawn seems to have been given her beautiful natural assets.
                        1f Billy

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X