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EVERYTHING BUT THE BLAZE - FIREHOLE (SWIMMING AREA MEADOW)

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  • EVERYTHING BUT THE BLAZE - FIREHOLE (SWIMMING AREA MEADOW)

    Below I will describe what I believe was FF’s journey to his final resting/hiding place. You will need both the perspective of a fly fisherman AND the imagination of a child to follow me. Many solves lack the imagination element. Let’s go…

    AS I HAVE GONE ALONE IN THERE
    AND WITH MY TREASURE BOLD,
    I CAN KEEP MY SECRET WHERE,
    AND HINT OF RICHES NEW AND OLD.

    Stanza #1 above gives a hint on where geographically to begin the search taking in account FF’s experiences as a child. “And hint of riches new and old” refers to riches new (bronze chest with gold) and riches old (Yellowstone National Park – our nation’s oldest park). FF spent all his childhood summers in Yellowstone. It was a place of intense imagination and exploration. Yellowstone was also full of places FF often went alone (to fish, to bathe, for adventure).

    Stanza #2 below gives beginning clues that map out the journey he took to hide his treasure. It is also the same journey he imagined he would take to his final resting place. A place so special to FF that he could not bear the thought of sharing it with anyone. Before FF hid his treasure in 2010 and published TTOTC, he submitted a few opinion column writings picked up by the Bozeman Daily Chronicle newspaper. On March 7, 2008, FF wrote “Memories of the past enrich our present”.

    https://www.bozemandailychronicle.co...111f540db.html

    The article was a short, nine-paragraph essay reflecting on this journey through life. In this writing, he mentions rediscovering the book Flywater and how special that book was to him reminding him of all the great fishing places where he fished as a kid under the tutelage of his father. Some were in Montana and other locations. "Those great places" were on the Firehole River. Many searchers want to swear by the Madison (at Nine Mile) or a location on the Gibbon as being ‘THE’ spot, and while those holes were also frequent places he fished with his family, the Firehole was his sacred alone place!

    “Those great places on the Firehole, which were personal secrets to me then, are now busy with the flourish of fisherman…. I always thought that space was mine alone, and many of the memories there bred are even now still so personal that they exclude the intrusion of strangers.”

    “Many others who have loved these waters before and after me understand that catching fish is not what it’s about. It’s the being there in the tranquility and silence of one’s self…”

    Those fishing places were personal secrets to him and were considered his alone. This ties back to the first stanza, first sentence, “As I have gone alone in there”. It is no coincidence that he left out those key details when publishing the TTOTC in 2010. Could it be he was correcting a previous publication error? Maybe, but consider he had published many other books before writing this column piece. I do not see it as an error. Also, the only fish mentioned in this chapter is a “brookie” - not to be found on the Madison in Yellowstone.

    BEGIN IT WHERE WARM WATERS HALT
    AND TAKE IT IN THE CANYON DOWN,
    NOT FAR, BUT TOO FAR TO WALK.
    PUT IN BELOW THE HOME OF BROWN.

    FF also wrote in another book Too Far To Walk (TFTW) “River Bathing”, about a private bathing location in Yellowstone NP where he often went alone. His cabin in West Yellowstone did not have hot, much less, any type of running water. “Where warm waters halt” is the Ojo Caliente Spring where the physical warm waters of the thermal spring seep into the cooler Firehole River. At that location, FF would move around in the Firehole River along the riverbank to find the perfect temperature of water to bath in. That experience was special to him as a child. So special, he tried to convince his grandchildren to experience it without luck and much disappointment. This is where his journey began, just after a nice warm bath to clean himself up.

    Below are two private emails from FF in the early days of the chase. In one, he describes the waters of the Firehole around Ojo as being a "magic place" but where the "hot geyser water warmed the cold river water" in just the right spot and "changing water temperatures" if the bather moved around. If he is describing the Firehole as cold and changing there as you move about, it cannot be also warm and halting later on at Madison Junction. Two, FF is expressing some real interest in Dal being in that area. I believe these show a personal mindset.


    https://www.hintofriches.com/core/im...EAAAICRAEAOw==

    Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_1605.PNG Views:	14 Size:	105.1 KB ID:	337176

    “Take it in the canyon down” is simply referring to continuing his journey downflow with the Firehole River into the Firehole Canyon. A narrow canyon made of steep lava flows that would channel water for a 1000 years in mostly the same path, unlike the wide Madison canyon where the river could meander over space and time.

    “Not far, but too far to walk” is referring to the general distance FF would go before he stopped. In the preface of TFTW, FF wrote about a special three-day fishing venture where he floated a small boat tethered to his belt as he fished the Madison (on the Montana side) downstream to Baker’s Hole Campground. The river distance was about ten miles. The experience cemented his connection to that special wilderness country. FF promised to someday make that trip again, but he never did. He wrote that his disappointment still casts a shadow across the Madison and at his age, it was just too far to walk.

    Also keep in mind FF often ride his bicycle to Ojo Caliente because it was literally too far to walk to from West Yellowstone. “Too far to walk” suggests both using another form of transportation besides walking AND a preset distance. From Ojo Caliente Spring, FF would proceed down the Firehole highway into Firehole canyon and stop somewhere that was too far to walk.


    Where did he stop? Well, how about at the home of Brown (hoB)!

    The kicker of the poem is the hoB! And you will never find a solution, until you think like a child with intense imagination. FF said children would have an advantage!


    The distance from Ojo Caliente to the hoB is approximately 8 miles, which certainly fits “too far to walk”. FF would naturally ride his bicycle (as a child) or drive a car (as a senior man nearing the end of this life to hide his chest and possibly die there). FF told us that he drove a vehicle to get part way to the secret location and then walked into the forest to hide his treasure coming back to his vehicle for a second time to finish the job. FF also said, once you find hoB, you can basically walk right to the treasure chest.

    Remember when FF told someone he could throw his bicycle in the “water high” and walk right to his final resting place (no one would be needed to find or retrieve his left-behind vehicle)?

    “What is wrong with me just riding my bike out there and throwing it in the water high when I am through with it?" (HOD Forrest Gets Mail 10/03/2012).

    Summarizing the above directional analysis, where FF must stop at hoB that’s also “too far to walk” MUST have a parking spot for a car AND have a spot to throw his bicycle off the road into the water so no one sees it if he chooses to ride a bicycle instead. (Still, there is more to come below on “water high” and how this additionally ties all in.)

    At the popular, family-friendly Firehole Swimming Area, there is an area to park a car along the road if you are hiding the treasure and need to make two trips, AND a water hole deep enough to submerge a bicycle you don’t want anyone to find, AS WELL AS, a cave on the opposite side of the river. That cave is simply the home of Brown where you must “put in” or cross the river below it.

    I know what you are thinking, but please continue to hear me out….

    So how does a child know this, yet it escapes most adults? Below I will explain. FF mentioned that he thought a kid would have an advantage at finding the treasure and that children have the greatest imagination because their thoughts run free. I’m guessing he knew this because FF probably found this exact cave as a child. When someone with imagination (a child) sees this cave from afar, the first thing they want to do is summon up some bravery and cautiously go explore it to find out what is inside. FF most certainly did this when he swam as a child at that location in the summers while at Yellowstone. And of course, what does your imagination tell you is inside a cave???? Yes! A bear. A grizzly bear that every child will relate to as being named by a book as “Brown”.

    So how did I get that name? Ever hear of the children’s book Brown Bear, Brown Bear? Recall in TTOTC chapter “Teachers with Ropes”, FF wrote that in most situations where art is concerned (pictures in a books would also be included), humans only use their visual senses - eyes. Show the poem to a child and using their eyes, they associate reading the home of Brown to be the home of bear on the cover of the children's book. Far too complicated for adults, but simple imagination for a child….

    Click image for larger version  Name:	Capture.PNG Views:	13 Size:	660.0 KB ID:	337177 Click image for larger version  Name:	Capture2.PNG Views:	16 Size:	280.4 KB ID:	337178
    Attached Files
    Last edited by FlyFishBrown; 09-15-2021, 10:05 PM.

  • #2
    FROM THERE IT’S NO PLACE FOR THE MEEK,
    THE END IS EVER DRAWING NIGH;
    THERE’LL BE NO PADDLE UP YOUR CREEK,
    JUST HEAVY LOADS AND WATER HIGH.

    Recall in TTOTC chapter “No Place for Biddies”, FF wrote about two old ladies making fun of him at the big church social for not running away from home in Texas because he was afraid to cross the road. It seemed rather odd for FF to write about this considering he walked to school each morning as well as rode his bike for miles up the Madison and Firehole rivers in the summer in YNP, except for its hidden meaning and relation to the poem solve. This chapter was but another childhood experience used to help guide us using hints to define his life’s asterisk. Another line to intersect with. Once FF “put in” at the swimming area “below the hoB” and got wet, “from there it’s no place for the meek”. Literally, you must have the courage to cross the cold Firehole River, especially at a place that your imagination told you was the home of Brown. That location may also have other groups of people watching you!

    The swimming hole satisfies many other things FF often said:

    “People will be surprised when they find out where it is."

    “The treasure is not hidden in a dangerous place in the normal definition of the word, realizing that there probably is no place on this planet that is safe under all conditions. Bloggers have quoted me as saying that a child could walk up to the treasure. I don’t think that’s an accurate quote because a three-year old girl would have a problem without some help. Remember, I was about 80 when I hid the chest, and had to make two trips.”

    A couple of weeks ago someone figured the first two clues right and got the third one accidently. But that is as close as they got.”

    “200/500 foot searcher locations.”

    “I hid the treasure in a place that is not especially difficult to reach.”

    “The end is ever drawing nigh”. Nigh meaning left and near, ever meaning always. So, what is always continuously ending on the left side of the Firehole River downflow after you cross below the hoB? How about a small unnamed creek! Yes, there is one there…..

    Next, did you notice the only semi-colon in the stanza? It means the next words after “the end is ever drawing nigh” are tied to the previous ones. It tells you the thing you are looking for is a creek and also something else about your creek. There will be no paddle up it. That’s because its too small/shallow to paddle up (probably spring fed). Possibly also because FF is inferring that a blaze (not a paddle) is up near that creek? You would need to be the Finder with boots on the ground (BOTG) to provide the final answer.

    So, what is also “up your creek” in a different direction? If you go up-river along the Firehole from where the creek ends in the Firehole, you find two things.
    1. Heavy loads
    2. Water high

    “Just heavy loads and water high”. Another place in the poem people get stuck. “Water high” meaning deep water in the swimming hole area (not a reference to a high elevation spot). As previously stated, water so deep FF could throw his bicycle into it (above reference) when he went there to die. There was no need for a car to be found later. So deep, the NPS closes the swimming hole in Spring and early Summer because the water is high. FF surely knew this from all his years exploring the Firehole Canyon and swimming there. [Also, what a great way to take advantage of extra security and deter people from the location than by having a water crossing that’s somewhat protected by nature’s natural closure for a few months of the early search season. The chest would be well protected.]

    “On our last few visits, we have been at Yellowstone in May and June. The Firehole has been closed to swimming because the water level was too high. It’s a nice place to take a short break when you are out exploring the park.”

    Heavy loads” refers to the frequent numbers of swimmers at that location when it’s open. Ever see the signs around the swimming pool about maximum bathing loads? Not trees, not rocks ….people!

    Two last thoughts on this stanza. It would take some additional courage (“treasure bold” – first stanza above) to cross a popular swimming area in order to hide a treasure. If you placed and/or retrieved it in early June, the chances are no one would be swimming there because the area might be closed by the park due to high water. You would also be violating park rules and might get in trouble (“If you are brave” – last stanza). Furthermore, even an 8-year-old FF could cross at or just south of the swimming hole area in that sort of family-friendly river crossing (calm water, waist-high depth).

    IF YOU’VE BEEN WISE AND FOUND THE BLAZE,
    LOOK QUICKLY DOWN, YOUR QUEST TO CEASE,
    BUT TARRY SCANT WITH MARVEL GAZE,
    JUST TAKE THE CHEST AND GO IN PEACE.

    So, what is at this location where the unknown creek enters the Firehole on the left below the hoB? How about a beautiful open meadow (under the “canopy of stars”, where FF’s wife Peggy would be waiting, because she always watched “Dancing with the Stars”). The area is lush and forested and while open, is surrounded by pines. Elevation is 7,100 feet – between 5,000 ft and 10,200 feet if you are doing quick general incorrect math in your head while on camera. My guess is that creek is also spring feed and that’s why it doesn’t show on many maps. A Google overhead search shows just how lush and green the place is compared to the rest of the canyon. You can even follow the unnamed creek a good distance back up into the side of the canyon wall. It is a place about the size of a football field, where a “moose and calf could come down out of the pines to feed on the water grasses”. A place “along the river bottoms where dreams and fantasies alike go to play.” A secret favorite place he could fish at the bend of the river and when his “tackle box is closed at last, and the Caddis hatch is gone, he will rest though all of time and space, pillowed down and scented in”. Remember, FF said that imagination was more important than knowledge. And what a marvel gaze that place must have down the Firehole!

    Stanza # 4 above all of a sudden seems to suggest a much-increased search tempo. It doesn’t make sense to have to be in a hurry at this final location (especially if its a secluded forest area) as one should be able to thoroughly enjoy finding the chest and taking it all in. Why do I have to “look quickly down”? Why after my quest is to cease is there a “tarry scant with marvel gaze” (interpreted to be very little delay with amazement)? FF is basically telling everyone to hurry and grab the damn chest and get the hell out of there….

    Well, considering the location near the Firehole swimming hole and the noisy populated tourist area, he is warning the Finder that you may be noticed. (Kind of like the chapter “Gypsy Magic”!) FF also made a statement that when he hid the chest, he was surprised that nobody was around to see him.

    SO WHY IS IT THAT I MUST GO
    AND LEAVE MY TROVE FOR ALL TO SEEK?
    THE ANSWERS I ALREADY KNOW,
    I’VE DONE IT TIRED, AND NOW I’M WEAK.

    Stanza # 5 above is where FF gives his reasons why he is leaving behind the treasure chest for all to seek. In the TTOTC chapter “My War For Me”, FF describes a night long flight moving a T-33 trainer jet from Stephenville, Newfoundland to Pope Field, North Carolina after he had been out all night at the Officer’s Club. While he didn’t drink alcohol, his body was already tired (“I’ve done it tired”). During that flight, he covered up Philadelphia with his thumb and then came to the realization that everyone lives in a small cocoon of our own surroundings and are victims of our tiny environments. Suddenly, the French soldier’s headstone at the base of the waterfall in Laos and Shakespeare’s writings made sense. FF wanted to enrich the lives of those whom he interacted each day and cause them to be better for the experience. By hiding the chest, FF was attempting to enrich the lives of thousands of people who read his book and went out into the beautiful countryside making memories to look for it. Just like “smiling at a homely girl.”
    Last edited by FlyFishBrown; 09-14-2021, 05:09 PM.

    Comment


    • #3
      SO HEAR ME ALL AND LISTEN GOOD,
      YOUR EFFORT WILL BE WORTH THE COLD.
      IF YOU ARE BRAVE AND IN THE WOOD
      I GIVE YOU TITLE TO THE GOLD.

      Stanza # 6 gives some final hints. “So hear me all and listen good” is probably a slight reference to the Laos waterfall. Remember it was so loud, FF could not hear the helicopter pilot starting up the aircraft and being forced to hurry? “Your effort will be worth the cold” definitely indicates you will be crossing the cold Firehole River and getting wet. “If you are brave and in the wood, I give you title to the gold”.

      “In the wood” is a most interesting and challenging phrase. It may have been used by FF because the chest was hidden in the nook of a tree or stump or in the collection/grouping of similar trees that stood out against the backdrop of all the others. It may have been used because FF employed the term as one would if playing darts to indicate that the Finder is on the exact treasure mark. “In the wood” for dart throwing indicates the thrower put one in the bullseye (made of wood/cork). I don't have an understanding of this because I didn't find the chest.

      The finder will specifically need to be given title to the gold, because when found in Yellowstone, National Park protocols call for returning the lost item to the rightful owner or for it to be initially turned into the custody of the park for a period of time for it to be claimed. It makes sense to end with “I give you title to the gold”. This could be also why the Finder allegedly first left it in place and then messaged FF to again receive additional permissions to legally take/own it. He wanted extra documentation to substantiate the rightful transfer of ownership.


      “Each year, more than 7,000 visitors to the various units of the National Park System file reports of lost or found items. Reporting a lost or found personal property in national parks in governed by 36 CFR 2.22, “Disposition of Property” which requires unattended property be impounded and deemed to be abandoned unless claimed by the owner or an authorized representative within 60 days.”

      So, think of the solve in these terms. Take many of the chapters of TTOTC and intersect them all. That’s the place where he wanted it all to come together. His asterisk. He told us our lives were all asterisks in a book that would never be written. Well, he wrote his book (TTOTC), secreted his treasure, and then dared us all to interpret it. It’s no surprise he continually told everyone that TTOTC was all that was needed!


      And all those experiences and life lessons he wrote about point right to this lush, serene place on the Firehole (in Yellowstone, at the bend of a river, in a favorite fishing area, near a waterfall, next to a place of noisy gypsy gatherings, where you must cross with bravery and imagination, under the open stars, where the backcountry and wildlife can be appreciated, but you must hurry…).

      Oh, did you notice the physical omega in nature? Yes, the one at Ojo Caliente. The Firehole River makes a perfect one at that location! And when TTOTC ends, that’s where you begin. The eternally connected circle of the ending becoming the beginning becoming the ending again. Life’s full circle. If I was forced to guess, the asterisk probably marked the spot...

      I anticipate some will not like this interpretation. I'm ok with that and hope some day we ALL can finally know.
      Last edited by FlyFishBrown; 09-16-2021, 08:57 PM.

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks for sharing a fully actionable solution. Kudos to you for thinking of it. While our methods are completely different, I can fully respect and appreciate the time and effort you put into working out your ideas. Your writing was very clear and cogent. I had no trouble following along with your thoughts and I found them to be interesting and reasonable. I'm sorry that you did not find what you sought as I think you would have made a fine and deserving contest winner.

        I also appreciate and agree with your closing sentiments.

        Respectfully Yours.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by MoonScavenger View Post
          Thanks for sharing a fully actionable solution. Kudos to you for thinking of it. While our methods are completely different, I can fully respect and appreciate the time and effort you put into working out your ideas. Your writing was very clear and cogent. I had no trouble following along with your thoughts and I found them to be interesting and reasonable. I'm sorry that you did not find what you sought as I think you would have made a fine and deserving contest winner.

          I also appreciate and agree with your closing sentiments.

          Respectfully Yours.
          Thank you. I appreciate your sentiments. We have ALL spent time and energy searching for an answer. No one's contribution is any more or less significant than the next. I don't desire any treasure. What I needed, FF already provided. I've already started to make those memories a much bigger priority in my life.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by FlyFishBrown View Post
            FROM THERE IT’S NO PLACE FOR THE MEEK,
            THE END IS EVER DRAWING NIGH;
            THERE’LL BE NO PADDLE UP YOUR CREEK,
            JUST HEAVY LOADS AND WATER HIGH.

            Recall in TTOTC chapter “No Place for Biddies”, FF wrote about two old ladies making fun of him at the big church social for not running away from home in Texas because he was afraid to cross the road. It seemed rather odd for FF to write about this considering he walked to school each morning as well as rode his bike for miles up the Madison and Firehole rivers in the summer in YNP, except for its hidden meaning and relation to the poem solve. This chapter was but another childhood experience used to help guide us using hints to define his life’s asterisk. Another line to intersect with. Once FF “put in” at the swimming area “below the hoB” and got wet, “from there it’s no place for the meek”. Literally, you must have the courage to cross the cold Firehole River, especially at a place that your imagination told you was the home of Brown. That location may also have other groups of people watching you!

            The swimming hole satisfies many other things FF often said:

            “People will be surprised when they find out where it is."

            “The treasure is not hidden in a dangerous place in the normal definition of the word, realizing that there probably is no place on this planet that is safe under all conditions. Bloggers have quoted me as saying that a child could walk up to the treasure. I don’t think that’s an accurate quote because a three-year old girl would have a problem without some help. Remember, I was about 80 when I hid the chest, and had to make two trips.”

            A couple of weeks ago someone figured the first two clues right and got the third one accidently. But that is as close as they got.”

            “200/500 foot searcher locations.”

            “I hid the treasure in a place that is not especially difficult to reach.”

            “The end is ever drawing nigh”. Nigh meaning left and near, ever meaning always. So, what is always continuously ending on the left side of the Firehole River downflow after you cross below the hoB? How about a small unnamed creek! Yes, there is one there…..

            Next, did you notice the only semi-colon in the stanza? It means the next words after “the end is ever drawing nigh” are tied to the previous ones. It tells you the thing you are looking for is a creek and also something else about your creek. There will be no paddle up it. That’s because its too small/shallow to paddle up (probably spring fed). Possibly also because FF is inferring that a blaze (not a paddle) is up near that creek? You would need to be the Finder with boots on the ground (BOTG) to provide the final answer.

            So, what is also “up your creek” in a different direction? If you go up-river along the Firehole from where the creek ends in the Firehole, you find two things.
            1. Heavy loads
            2. Water high

            “Just heavy loads and water high”. Another place in the poem people get stuck. “Water high” meaning deep water in the swimming hole area (not a reference to a high elevation spot). As previously stated, water so deep FF could throw his bicycle into it (above reference) when he went there to die. There was no need for a car to be found later. So deep, the NPS closes the swimming hole in Spring and early Summer because the water is high. FF surely knew this from all his years exploring the Firehole Canyon and swimming there. [Also, what a great way to take advantage of extra security and deter people from the location than by having a water crossing that’s somewhat protected by nature’s natural closure for a few months of the early search season. The chest would be well protected.]

            “On our last few visits, we have been at Yellowstone in May and June. The Firehole has been closed to swimming because the water level was too high. It’s a nice place to take a short break when you are out exploring the park.”

            Heavy loads” refers to the frequent numbers of swimmers at that location when it’s open. Ever see the signs around the swimming pool about maximum bathing loads? Not trees, not rocks ….people!

            Two last thoughts on this stanza. It would take some additional courage (“treasure bold” – first stanza above) to cross a popular swimming area in order to hide a treasure. If you placed and/or retrieved it in early June, the chances are no one would be swimming there because the area might be closed by the park due to high water. You would also be violating park rules and might get in trouble (“If you are brave” – last stanza). Furthermore, even an 8-year-old FF could cross at or just south of the swimming hole area in that sort of family-friendly river crossing (calm water, waist-high depth).

            IF YOU’VE BEEN WISE AND FOUND THE BLAZE,
            LOOK QUICKLY DOWN, YOUR QUEST TO CEASE,
            BUT TARRY SCANT WITH MARVEL GAZE,
            JUST TAKE THE CHEST AND GO IN PEACE.

            So, what is at this location where the unknown creek enters the Firehole on the left below the hoB? How about a beautiful open meadow (under the “canopy of stars”, where FF’s wife Peggy would be waiting, because she always watched “Dancing with the Stars”). The area is lush and forested and while open, is surrounded by pines. Elevation is 7,100 feet – between 5,000 ft and 10,200 feet if you are doing quick general incorrect math in your head while on camera. My guess is that creek is also spring feed and that’s why it doesn’t show on many maps. A Google overhead search shows just how lush and green the place is compared to the rest of the canyon. You can even follow the unnamed creek a good distance back up into the side of the canyon wall. It is a place about the size of a football field, where a “moose and calf could come down out of the pines to feed on the water grasses”. A place “along the river bottoms where dreams and fantasies alike go to play.” A secret favorite place he could fish at the bend of the river and when his “tackle box is closed at last, and the Caddis hatch is gone, he will rest though all of time and space, pillowed down and scented in”. Remember, FF said that imagination was more important than knowledge. And what a marvel gaze that place must have down the Firehole!

            Stanza # 4 above all of a sudden seems to suggest a much-increased search tempo. It doesn’t make sense to have to be in a hurry at this final location (especially if its a secluded forest area) as one should be able to thoroughly enjoy finding the chest and taking it all in. Why do I have to “look quickly down”? Why after my quest is to cease is there a “tarry scant with marvel gaze” (interpreted to be very little delay with amazement)? FF is basically telling everyone to hurry and grab the damn chest and get the hell out of there….

            Well, considering the location near the Firehole swimming hole and the noisy populated tourist area, he is warning the Finder that you may be noticed. (Kind of like the chapter “Gypsy Magic”!) FF also made a statement that when he hid the chest, he was surprised that nobody was around to see him.

            SO WHY IS IT THAT I MUST GO
            AND LEAVE MY TROVE FOR ALL TO SEEK?
            THE ANSWERS I ALREADY KNOW,
            I’VE DONE IT TIRED, AND NOW I’M WEAK.

            Stanza # 5 above is where FF gives his reasons why he is leaving behind the treasure chest for all to seek. In the TTOTC chapter “My War For Me”, FF describes a night long flight moving a T-33 trainer jet from Stephenville, Newfoundland to Pope Field, North Carolina after he had been out all night at the Officer’s Club. While he didn’t drink alcohol, his body was already tired (“I’ve done it tired”). During that flight, he covered up Philadelphia with his thumb and then came to the realization that everyone lives in a small cocoon of our own surroundings and are victims of our tiny environments. Suddenly, the French soldier’s headstone at the base of the waterfall in Laos and Shakespeare’s writings made sense. FF wanted to enrich the lives of those whom he interacted each day and cause them to be better for the experience. By hiding the chest, FF was attempting to enrich the lives of thousands of people who read his book and went out into the beautiful countryside making memories to look for it. Just like “smiling at a homely girl.”
            Since the title of this thread starts with "EVERYTHING BUT THE BLAZE", are you suggesting that your solve doesn't include finding a blaze?
            If it doesn't, then you don't have a correct solve, as far as I'm concerned.
            Also, I don't think that FF expected a searcher with a small child in tow to cross the Firehole River (or any other one) on foot, wading. The bottom of the river could be pretty slippery. Please don't join the Darwin club by drowning, okay? Thank you in advance for being careful.
            Last edited by Old Pilot; 09-15-2021, 03:51 AM.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Old Pilot View Post

              Since the title of this thread starts with "EVERYTHING BUT THE BLAZE", are you suggesting that your solve doesn't include finding a blaze?
              If it doesn't, then you don't have a correct solve, as far as I'm concerned.
              Also, I don't think that FF expected a searcher with a small child in tow to cross the Firehole River (or any other one) on foot, wading. The bottom of the river could be pretty slippery. Please don't join the Darwin club by drowning, okay? Thank you in advance for being careful.
              Thanks for the reply. My solve includes finding some blaze, but my blaze suggestion was more of a guess based on content in TTOTC as compared to trying to follow the poems physical directions to find the location. FF could have definitely used any of the other ones frequently mentioned all over this forum. The Firehole swimming area is full of kids each summer when it’s open. It has a very low flow force at this location and less than waist deep water later in the summer. You see kids crossing it on the far side all the time.
              Last edited by FlyFishBrown; 09-15-2021, 09:48 PM.

              Comment


              • #8
                Wanted to give this thread a bump so it remains near the top page. I'm short on time to devote to this website this week and I'm still thinking the solve through before commenting substantively.

                Thanks for providing a cogent solve that is formatted and framed well. I can understand the steps you are taking along the way.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Crazy Midwesterner View Post
                  Wanted to give this thread a bump so it remains near the top page. I'm short on time to devote to this website this week and I'm still thinking the solve through before commenting substantively.

                  Thanks for providing a cogent solve that is formatted and framed well. I can understand the steps you are taking along the way.
                  Thank you for the reply. I put it out there in the hopes it will give someone else the next leap forward. Seriously, pick it apart. That will help them also….

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                  • #10
                    That's a pretty good solve, good job.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Must Listengood View Post
                      That's a pretty good solve, good job.
                      Thank you for the reply. I’m still looking for that better quiet place where the “waters deepen into cobalt” and he can net his “brookie.” And a place with the rainbow…

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                      • #12
                        After further reflection on the solve, I'll comment that I don't believe this is reasonably likely to be the spot where the treasure was placed. That being said, I like a lot of the logic you used FlyFishBrown and appreciate the work you've done bringing the idea to the community.

                        Here's just a few of the surface-level disagreements I have:
                        1. The distance from Ojo Caliente spring to your put in location is approximately the same distance (about 4 miles) as the 9MH solve. It is not 8 miles. It seems hypocritical to call the NFBTFTW distance in the 9MH solve too short and then not employ that same logic.
                        2. I don’t like that WWWH in this solve is not immediately near a canyon. It feels like more of a stretch geographically. Don’t get me wrong, I love Ojo Caliente as a WWWH, but I don’t love the next phase of the poem as a result.
                        3. I subjectively don’t give a lot of credit to solves involving pareidolia. It’s possible the HoB uses pareidolia, I’ll concede it, but I think that’s a stretch to have your HoB be a reference to Brown Bear Brown Bear.
                        4. I don’t like the conclusion that “heavy loads” and “water high” are upriver and not actually “up” the creek referenced before the semicolon in the poem. To me, those two phrases should relate to the appropriate identification of “your creek,” and not serve as more descriptors of the river you cross. I also disagree with posters who believe the boulders at the 9MH location are the “heavy loads” for the same reason.
                        5. I think part of this solve is created to justify the FF comment about throwing your bike into the “water high” and the “water high” hiding the bike. I don’t give much credence to that FF question. It’s not a statement of fact; it can be interpreted in multiple ways.
                        6. The exact same criticisms to the 9MH solve (about 500/200 feet and FF walking a “few” miles” to place the treasure) apply to this solve.
                        Here's what I like about it:
                        • The research/argument for why the Firehole should be called to attention. The deletion of "Firehole" between the Bozeman Daily Chronicle story and the eventual publication in TTOTC could certainly be an effort to hide a connection to the Firehole.
                        • Forrest’s comment early in the chase about Dal maybe finding the treasure (along the Firehole) is persuasive to me.
                        • Your explanation of what each stanza means. I liked that a lot.
                        Ultimately, the correct solution may be on the Firehole. I really want to see something that makes sense near Sentinel Meadows/Queen’s Laundry/Bath Springs. Love the “heavy loads and water high” phrase with “your creek” being in that area.

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