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Everard Jean Hinrichs

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  • Everard Jean Hinrichs

    “Over the course of his career, Sloane produced over 15,000 artworks and 38 illustrated books. He died of a heart attack in 1985 on the steps of New York’s Plaza Hotel, on his way to a luncheon in his honor. The event was a celebration for the release of his biography, ‘Eighty: An American Souvenir.’

    It looks like Forrest embellished his friends death to align with ttotc better. Why would Forrest say that he died waiting at a cross walk? I always wondered if Eric was not a contributing factor in Forrest’s success.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Sarah Seedling View Post
    “Over the course of his career, Sloane produced over 15,000 artworks and 38 illustrated books. He died of a heart attack in 1985 on the steps of New York’s Plaza Hotel, on his way to a luncheon in his honor. The event was a celebration for the release of his biography, ‘Eighty: An American Souvenir.’

    It looks like Forrest embellished his friends death to align with ttotc better. Why would Forrest say that he died waiting at a cross walk? I always wondered if Eric was not a contributing factor in Forrest’s success.
    Good research. Thanks for sharing. It confirms the conclusion of OP that “cross” was an important word. But “cross over” does not necessarily refer to a river like the Maddison, lik many seem to think.. It could also refer to the cross over of a creek, what is also safe for small children, like Forrest always pretended. I think the cross over of a creek, to reach a side creek that had no paddle up near its spring, was necessary to walk towards the hiding spot of the treasure. Not a difficult walk for Forrest at his eighties.

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    • #3
      Obviously he wasn’t color blind, wasn’t there something in the old biddies chapter that said Forrest couldn’t run away from home because he wasn’t allowed to cross the street?

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      • #4
        It’s not say he didn’t tell the truth just not the whole.

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        • #5
          ard seems important

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Old blue View Post
            ard seems important
            Ya Remember the abbreviated version of Edward? Edard

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Sarah Seedling View Post

              Ya Remember the abbreviated version of Edward? Edard
              Yes do you know what it is hinting at

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              • #8
                Don’t know, maybe an abbreviation for hard. Some drop the h in speech.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Sarah Seedling View Post
                  Obviously he wasn’t color blind, wasn’t there something in the old biddies chapter that said Forrest couldn’t run away from home because he wasn’t allowed to cross the street?
                  This was likely his way of saying not to underestimate his ability in old age, the same way as the biddies did in his young age. Don't think that he can't cross "your creek" at age 79 or 80. He can, just as he could cross the street at his early age.

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                  • #10
                    I would say give credit where it is due . Otherwise , that will dry up quickly on you

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Old blue View Post

                      Yes do you know what it is hinting at
                      This always made me wonder how well f knew George R. R. Martin.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by PrincePaco View Post

                        This always made me wonder how well f knew George R. R. Martin.
                        Hodor! Hodor!
                        „It‘s almost impossible to carry the torch of truth through a crowd without singeing somebody‘s beard.“
                        G. C. Lichtenberg

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