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Look at the poem like a child

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  • Look at the poem like a child

    A kid who can't yet read, may look at the poem and see 5 evenly spaced lines (between the stanzas). In the search area, especially after UT and ID were crossed out, there are 5 evenly spaced lines. I've married the poem, which "is a map", to a map in several ways using this approach. Obviously, I didn't AHA, but if there's a solution that hides in plain sight, that a kid may pick up on easier, maybe its the container as much as the content.

    ....Just another noodle flung at the wall

    *The parallels that define state/national borders
    Last edited by JEffjeFF; 06-21-2021, 12:08 AM.

  • #2
    Look at the poem like a child

    Maybe he was teaching folk to sulk, lose trust/faith in friends and accuse them of pinching sweets/goodies, like a lot of searchers do.

    I suppose that can only work if a person is wired that way though.

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    • #3
      I do believe that Forrest said in a video at Collected Works "A kid might have an advantage, don't ask me to explain" or words to that effect.
      If we were to keep it simplistic it may be that he is relating to ABC as 123 the use of a simple letter to number cipher. As a child you are aware of letters and numbers during learning.
      Just a thought.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by starwheel View Post
        "A kid might have an advantage, don't ask me to explain" or words to that effect.
        Click image for larger version

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        • #5
          Originally posted by fflegacy

          This phrase was not related to the solution of the poem, but to the search for the last key: toys and dolls. An adult may not notice, but a child has the advantage. The nook, aka the rabbit hole, turned out to be both scary and fun. I think that's why Forrest was laughing on the way back.
          fflegacy On the contrary I believe the reason for Forrest's laughter on the way back was because he thought it was humorous considering where he actually hid it. In other words people will never ever consider he would put it there. I believe he said "You will be surprised when you find out where it was" Somewhere you would never expect it to be and its position caused him to laugh out loud to himself.

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          • #6
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            • #7
              Originally posted by fflegacy

              This phrase was not related to the solution of the poem, but to the search for the last key: toys and dolls. An adult may not notice, but a child has the advantage. The nook, aka the rabbit hole, turned out to be both scary and fun. I think that's why Forrest was laughing on the way back.
              I always thought of the nook as being the opposite of a rabbit hole . . . but after careful consideration, have decided that they may both share some similarities.

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              • #8
                My totally not confirmation bias meaning of the child comment was to treat the poem as a word search.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Knowledge View Post
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                  My children attended art camps and we still have some of their best pieces on display. I will always remember the teacher lamenting that most children lose their true creativeness as they age. Not the case here. Forrest Fenn never lost his ability to surprise with new twists and turns. It’s a delight to see his productions!

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                  • #10
                    I found this short piece recently and I thought it contained an almost perfect allegory for the chase:

                    https://www.brainpickings.org/2015/0...l-silverstein/

                    The first paragraph follows, but I think it's worth reading all the way through.

                    The best children’s books, as Tolkien asserted and Sendak agreed, aren’t written for children; they are enjoyed by children, but they speak to our deepest longings and fears, and thus enchant humans of all ages. But the spell only works, as legendary children’s book editor Ursula Nordstrom memorably remarked, “if the dull adult isn’t too dull to admit that he doesn’t know the answers to everything.”
                    The freshness and sense of fun and wonder of a new and unencumbered mind would definitely have an advantage, IMO.

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                    • #11
                      Don't ever underestimate the value of a Big O...

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by wwwamericana View Post
                        Don't ever underestimate the value of a Big O...
                        Or even an Ore-O . . . !

                        I think that when FF told us that success would only come to the one who could "best adjust," he might easily have been talking about the agility of a child's mind. These days I find that I tend to dig a hole, crawl in, curl up, and go to sleep for long periods. Every now and then, though, something comes along to kick me in the pants or dribble in my ear and then, fussing and moaning, I reluctantly climb out, look around, and search for a new home. Old age and the chase take effort - and lots of it!

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