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  • #91
    Originally posted by BritChaser View Post

    Also, what does aberration mean to everyone?

    Also, how do you ‘sprinkle’ only 4 subtle-clues across the stories in TTOTC? (Again, based on the hypothesis that there are 4, could that suggest that the 4 are built up from multiple parts of many chapters? As opposed to 4 small snippets?)

    No place for biddies.. would ff really speak ill of the dead like that.. I doubt it. It has made up all over it. Made up to place a hint. Or the whole thing is a hint.

    Since your project is about keeping it simple I will say stick to his words. A couple of good hints were added and mixed between the stories in the book sporadically and their purpose was to provide help with the clues. An aberration could be defined in multiple ways, but I think he meant that they could relate and/or help with the clues indirectly.

    I agree with your suspicion that the chapter about the biddies was all 'made up'.

    Comment


    • #92
      Originally posted by Anna Graham View Post

      You’ve got to throw away the rose colored glasses. Jack doesn’t want you to know how he solved it or where he solved it. So what makes you think that any of the information he is giving you is correct. Take everything he says with a grain of salt.

      aberration to me means anomaly
      I think aberration is a bit more than an anomaly; it's a departure from what is normal or expected, and is generally unwelcome. It comes from Latin, to stray.

      One glaring aberration is the toes under Fenn's arm at the beginning of the book - the picture of him signing books at Turquoise Mine, look just under his name tag - toes (or fingers) that belong to no one, they're just there. Is something "a foot" like the foot that isn't attached to a body in the Gypsy Magic picture?
      Last edited by RahRah; 06-10-2021, 09:54 PM.
      To be right for someone, you have to be willing to be wrong for someone else.

      Comment


      • #93
        Originally posted by BritChaser View Post



        Also, how do you ‘sprinkle’ only 4 subtle-clues across the stories in TTOTC? (Again, based on the hypothesis that there are 4, could that suggest that the 4 are built up from multiple parts of many chapters? As opposed to 4 small snippets?)

        No place for biddies.. would ff really speak ill of the dead like that.. I doubt it. It has made up all over it. Made up to place a hint. Or the whole thing is a hint.
        I agree No Place for Biddies is made up, and I believe there is a reason for it.

        So far as "sprinkling" clues/hints in the stories - themes, saying the same thing a different way, again and again. IMO there is absolutely an underlying story (I've called it the "under story" in the past, like the under story of a forest) and once you begin to see it, you cannot unsee it, it's just there, again and again and again.

        To be right for someone, you have to be willing to be wrong for someone else.

        Comment


        • #94
          Originally posted by RahRah View Post

          I agree No Place for Biddies is made up, and I believe there is a reason for it.

          So far as "sprinkling" clues/hints in the stories - themes, saying the same thing a different way, again and again. IMO there is absolutely an underlying story (I've called it the "under story" in the past, like the under story of a forest) and once you begin to see it, you cannot unsee it, it's just there, again and again and again.
          It is impossible for Jack to have solved the poem without understanding who the biddies were.

          Comment


          • #95
            Originally posted by colokidd View Post
            It is impossible for Jack to have solved the poem without understanding who the biddies were.
            Maybe there's a homosexual solve?

            Comment


            • #96
              Originally posted by Tornado View Post

              Maybe there's a homosexual solve?
              There wouldn’t be anything wrong about that kind of solve.

              Comment


              • #97
                Originally posted by colokidd View Post
                There wouldn’t be anything wrong about that kind of solve.
                Its a bit too deep for me...

                Comment


                • #98
                  Originally posted by Mr Eyes View Post

                  Its a bit too deep for me...
                  Seinfeld reference, "Not that there's anything wrong with that."

                  All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident.
                  --Arthur Schopenhauer--

                  Comment


                  • #99
                    Originally posted by RahRah View Post

                    I think aberration is a bit more than an anomaly; it's a departure from what is normal or expected, and is generally unwelcome. It comes from Latin, to stray.

                    One glaring aberration is the toes under Fenn's arm at the beginning of the book - the picture of him signing books at Turquoise Mine, look just under his name tag - toes (or fingers) that belong to no one, they're just there. Is something "a foot" like the foot that isn't attached to a body in the Gypsy Magic picture?
                    Anomaly is a synonym of aberration.

                    “There are nine clues in the poem, but if you read the book (TTOTC), there are a couple…there are a couple of good hints and there are a couple of aberrations that live out on the edge.” Moby Dickens Book Shop 34:41 mark

                    You always have to disagree don’t you Rah Rah. The obvious errors are hints at the solution. But Fenn wasn’t going to just come out and say that the errors were hints so he called them aberrations that live out on the edge.
                    All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident.
                    --Arthur Schopenhauer--

                    Comment


                    • I’ve always liked the idea that aberrations out on the edge were errors, seemingly mistakes. But are they the hints or do the point to a hint nearby in the text?

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by BritChaser View Post
                        I’ve always liked the idea that aberrations out on the edge were errors, seemingly mistakes. But are they the hints or do the point to a hint nearby in the text?
                        Well, you say honest Jack told you there are only 4 in the book, so deduct that from the number of mistakes and turn it into a percentage. That will give the misguided level of probability.

                        Comment


                        • I don’t believe there are only 4 hints, unless they comprise a bunch of repeated, individual bits that, when put together and understood, create a whole.

                          For example: in First Grade, parking spot = halt, (hammering in the sign = nailing down the first clue), ‘where he went in’=where he began, ‘bounce’=spring (and Mae is a spring month). Principal=first, headwaters, key…

                          The picture I get in my mind is that the first, the beginning—WWWH— is near where you enter, you are in a park, parking where there is a wooden sign that’s easy to notice, and perhaps there is a spring and something resembling biscuits (mentioned here and in the Jump-Starting chapter). Warm and hot springs can have little formations that look like biscuits, and are actually called biscuits (not just at Biscuit Basin). So then what? What is ‘in the canyon down’ from that spot?

                          Madison is an interesting word. Besides being the name of one of the main Founding Fathers, it’s the name of the headwaters lake of the Firehole River, and the name given to Firehole+Gibbon Rivers when they marry.

                          mad I son
                          mad eyes on

                          …both of which appear in Jump-Starting the Learning Curve in association with raging (river) Miss Ford, who in turn, quickly (rapids) marches (March is a spring month) DOWN to Marvin’s office (anyone else remember this from childhood? ‘dad’s not here, he’s at the office’ [fishing!]). She’s also DOWN at the end, away from the ‘biscuits & gravy.’

                          So, if ff is describing a path, then down canyon from the principal/headwaters/most important spring-with-biscuits and sign is a tumultuous, raging river or creek (you ford those, as opposed to a reservoir or lake). What that ford (cross, go in peace) has to do with ‘old bat’ I don’t know, but an old bat is a term used for a tree that’s been hit by lightning. Other strange/anomalous phrases appearing here: corroded, slowing to a stop and soaking in, eyes, Spanish (Miss Ford appears to believe in Spanish immersion teaching! or perhaps a dip in a Spanish-named feature).

                          And that’s just the first half of the chapter!

                          (Or maybe it’s just a story about something that really happened, written oddly, with randomly named people. )



                          Comment


                          • The WWWH hint I believe was pg 62 of TTOTC where Forrest was talking about following the stream that "seemed to have an anxious purpose of some sort....Gradually, that little stream got narrower and narrower and deeper and deeper until it developed vertical sides that nothing could get through but water." This leads me to The Sinks.

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by Anna Graham View Post

                              Anomaly is a synonym of aberration.

                              “There are nine clues in the poem, but if you read the book (TTOTC), there are a couple…there are a couple of good hints and there are a couple of aberrations that live out on the edge.” Moby Dickens Book Shop 34:41 mark

                              You always have to disagree don’t you Rah Rah. The obvious errors are hints at the solution. But Fenn wasn’t going to just come out and say that the errors were hints so he called them aberrations that live out on the edge.
                              I agree that the errors are hints, he wrote in the book that "facts written wrong" are an issue for him, so of course when we find things wrong we should look at what is correct and why he would include it in a wrong way (I'm thinking about things like Redford's Outlaw Trail, that a Farewell to Arms, not For Whom the Bell Tolls, and a bunch of other things that have been noted over the years). Anomaly is definitely a synonym, but I also feel it's important that an aberration is unexpected/unwelcome, it's more than just off, it's glaring/jarring type anomaly. For the record, I do enjoy your posts and wasn't trying to be contrarian.
                              To be right for someone, you have to be willing to be wrong for someone else.

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by Lady V View Post
                                I don’t believe there are only 4 hints, unless they comprise a bunch of repeated, individual bits that, when put together and understood, create a whole.

                                For example: in First Grade, parking spot = halt, (hammering in the sign = nailing down the first clue), ‘where he went in’=where he began, ‘bounce’=spring (and Mae is a spring month). Principal=first, headwaters, key…

                                The picture I get in my mind is that the first, the beginning—WWWH— is near where you enter, you are in a park, parking where there is a wooden sign that’s easy to notice, and perhaps there is a spring and something resembling biscuits (mentioned here and in the Jump-Starting chapter). Warm and hot springs can have little formations that look like biscuits, and are actually called biscuits (not just at Biscuit Basin). So then what? What is ‘in the canyon down’ from that spot?

                                Madison is an interesting word. Besides being the name of one of the main Founding Fathers, it’s the name of the headwaters lake of the Firehole River, and the name given to Firehole+Gibbon Rivers when they marry.

                                mad I son
                                mad eyes on

                                …both of which appear in Jump-Starting the Learning Curve in association with raging (river) Miss Ford, who in turn, quickly (rapids) marches (March is a spring month) DOWN to Marvin’s office (anyone else remember this from childhood? ‘dad’s not here, he’s at the office’ [fishing!]). She’s also DOWN at the end, away from the ‘biscuits & gravy.’

                                So, if ff is describing a path, then down canyon from the principal/headwaters/most important spring-with-biscuits and sign is a tumultuous, raging river or creek (you ford those, as opposed to a reservoir or lake). What that ford (cross, go in peace) has to do with ‘old bat’ I don’t know, but an old bat is a term used for a tree that’s been hit by lightning. Other strange/anomalous phrases appearing here: corroded, slowing to a stop and soaking in, eyes, Spanish (Miss Ford appears to believe in Spanish immersion teaching! or perhaps a dip in a Spanish-named feature).

                                And that’s just the first half of the chapter!

                                (Or maybe it’s just a story about something that really happened, written oddly, with randomly named people. )


                                See I took TTOTC like this, I found hundreds of hints/parts of hints connected... but if I'm dead honest with myself some were more certain than others.. I'm wondering if we are open-minded to some just being coincidence, even though our intuition says otherwise, what are the 4 best ones. The tightest, undoubtable links to clues.

                                What do you think?

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