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A Word that is Key

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  • A Word that is Key

    Forrest gave us a little phrase to mull over in our efforts to decipher the poem and make the major breakthroughs in locating the chest. That phrase is 'a word that is key.'

    He kept throwing it out there even though it wasn't in the poem. Nor was it defined anywhere else as far as I can tell. Yet it showed up often enough to make us squirm with frustration. Five words that were a tantalizing little hint, maddening in their simplicity.

    A short definition of key:: 'of paramount or crucial importance.'
    ***Paramount: more important than anything else; supreme.
    ***Crucial: decisive or critical, especially in the success or failure of something.
    That pretty much illustrates the importance of the key word in Fenn's mind.

    So apparently we're dead in the water without the word that is key.

    My conclusion after much on-the-ground experience was this: the word that is key is Colorado.

    Hooray! Colorado wins again! So, apparently going to Colorado is Paramount and Crucial to our success. None of the other three states, nor any other state at all, was as important as Colorado.

    Colorado is not key because the treasure was hidden there--it wasn't. Colorado is key because even though the treasure was hidden in New Mexico you had to first travel to Colorado in order to access the treasure location in New Mexico. In one sense the treasure is in a very isolated place yet you can walk there without a lot of effort. Walk, not drive.

    On a national map New Mexico appears to be south of, or below, Colorado (the home of Brown.)

    In the poem Forrest says "put in below the home of Brown." This means find a point in Colorado near the CO/NM border where you can walk across--or below--the state line to the treasure location in New Mexico.


  • #2
    The treasure was not in, at, or near Toltec gorge, but that whole area is a special place.

    Comment


    • #3
      I don't recall mentioning Toltec Gorge in this post.

      Comment


      • #4
        Alone

        https://www.hintofriches.com/forum/t...ording-to-usda

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        • #5
          Here's a hint: a Word that IS kEy. Hope this helps !

          Comment


          • #6
            I believe Jack said when he asked Forrest about that, F said he didn’t even remember saying that. I know a lot of people don’t believe Jack, but there seem to be more and more examples of Forrest saying one thing years ago and the towards the end changing his mind and saying something different. (Alluding that he would reveal the spot and clues being a big one) and if “a word that is key” really isn’t important (or doesn’t exist, as jack said Forrest implied), F saying that definitely threw off a lot of searchers who might’ve wasted valuable time trying to find a key word to “unlock” the poem. Just my opinion.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by UNtitleD Brave View Post
              Here's a hint: a Word that IS kEy. Hope this helps !
              Nope, doesn't change a thing.
              Colorado is the key word, plain & simple.
              But thanks for trying.

              Comment


              • #8
                It's a competent, respectable solve, Lars, and for a while it was mine as well. But you're reaching with this:
                Originally posted by larsonist View Post
                Forrest gave us a little phrase to mull over in our efforts to decipher the poem and make the major breakthroughs in locating the chest. That phrase is 'a word that is key.'
                So apparently we're dead in the water without the word that is key.
                Fenn said all you need is the poem. Now I know you advocate ignoring Fenn quotes that contradict you, Wyoming being the most glaring example, but you have no evidence whatsoever that the key word was either necessary or sufficient to solve the riddle.

                It pains me to cast you as a cherry picker, but you're a raving cherry picker.

                Originally posted by larsonist View Post
                He kept throwing it out there even though it wasn't in the poem.
                Just because you picked it (up) doesn't make it not a cherry.

                Noooobody expects the Chase Underground. Our chief weapons are fear, surprise, ruthless efficiency, and an almost fanatical devotion to the POEM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Hybridpi View Post
                  I believe Jack said when he asked Forrest about that, F said he didn’t even remember saying that. I know a lot of people don’t believe Jack, but there seem to be more and more examples of Forrest saying one thing years ago and the towards the end changing his mind and saying something different. (Alluding that he would reveal the spot and clues being a big one) and if “a word that is key” really isn’t important (or doesn’t exist, as jack said Forrest implied), F saying that definitely threw off a lot of searchers who might’ve wasted valuable time trying to find a key word to “unlock” the poem. Just my opinion.
                  It's true that F tapered off using some of the early hints.
                  I do remember seeing the 'key' meme on one of Dal's pages and it stuck in my mind.
                  I may have also heard F discuss it in one of his town meeting videos.
                  There's also the fact that I latched onto Colorado very early due to the red/blue/yellow flag solution---which is very key indeed.
                  I never told him that.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I always thought Brown was the key word. Green + Red = Brown. Now, how many drainages combine to yield it.
                    Noooobody expects the Chase Underground. Our chief weapons are fear, surprise, ruthless efficiency, and an almost fanatical devotion to the POEM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by whiskynovember View Post
                      I always thought Brown was the key word. Green + Red = Brown. Now, how many drainages combine to yield it.
                      Green = yellow and blue, so green + red is yellow + blue + red = brown
                      To be right for someone, you have to be willing to be wrong for someone else.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        F confirmed a key word as late as the KPRO interview with D. Preston. For him to tell Jack he doesn't remember does not make sense. And I am not convinced that Jack is BSing about that.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by larsonist View Post
                          Forrest gave us a little phrase to mull over in our efforts to decipher the poem and make the major breakthroughs in locating the chest. That phrase is 'a word that is key.'

                          He kept throwing it out there even though it wasn't in the poem. Nor was it defined anywhere else as far as I can tell. Yet it showed up often enough to make us squirm with frustration. Five words that were a tantalizing little hint, maddening in their simplicity.

                          A short definition of key:: 'of paramount or crucial importance.'
                          ***Paramount: more important than anything else; supreme.
                          ***Crucial: decisive or critical, especially in the success or failure of something.
                          That pretty much illustrates the importance of the key word in Fenn's mind.

                          So apparently we're dead in the water without the word that is key.

                          My conclusion after much on-the-ground experience was this: the word that is key is Colorado.

                          Hooray! Colorado wins again! So, apparently going to Colorado is Paramount and Crucial to our success. None of the other three states, nor any other state at all, was as important as Colorado.

                          Colorado is not key because the treasure was hidden there--it wasn't. Colorado is key because even though the treasure was hidden in New Mexico you had to first travel to Colorado in order to access the treasure location in New Mexico. In one sense the treasure is in a very isolated place yet you can walk there without a lot of effort. Walk, not drive.

                          On a national map New Mexico appears to be south of, or below, Colorado (the home of Brown.)

                          In the poem Forrest says "put in below the home of Brown." This means find a point in Colorado near the CO/NM border where you can walk across--or below--the state line to the treasure location in New Mexico.
                          Is your conclusion (after much on-the-ground experience) -- that the word that is key is Colorado -- based on knowledge gained while BOTG hiking in search of the Fenn treasure?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by UNtitleD Brave View Post
                            Here's a hint: a Word that IS kEy. Hope this helps !
                            Forrest wasn't that cavalier with capitalization. As always, part of my opinion.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Hybridpi View Post
                              I believe Jack said when he asked Forrest about that, F said he didn’t even remember saying that. I know a lot of people don’t believe Jack, but there seem to be more and more examples of Forrest saying one thing years ago and the towards the end changing his mind and saying something different. (Alluding that he would reveal the spot and clues being a big one) and if “a word that is key” really isn’t important (or doesn’t exist, as jack said Forrest implied), F saying that definitely threw off a lot of searchers who might’ve wasted valuable time trying to find a key word to “unlock” the poem. Just my opinion.
                              No specific word is so "key", compared to others, that it will provide a major unlocking of the poem by itself. The entire poem should be considered in excruciating detail to achieve a good solve.
                              Yes, this means using a dictionary -- even if you might be embarrassed if you admitted that you used it. Guess what? You don't have to admit that you used it. As always, part of my opinion.

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