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  • "Within a few steps"

    If Forrest truly believed that a good solve of the poem would lead someone to a place within a few steps of the chest, this suggests that the poem was very precise in its directions. And since the possible search areas fill 4 of the United States (less buildings, other structures, outhouses, graveyards, and dangerous places), I strongly believe that some "landmarks" are important in solving the poem. And at least one of them would be fairly small.

    Since a very large lake such as Yellowstone Lake may be thought to "stand out", it may be thought of as being a significant landmark. But it's also huge, so in and of itself, doesn't indicate a small area or narrow search path to follow, BOTG. Please note that I'm not suggesting that this particular lake is part of a good solve. I just couldn't as quickly think of the name of any other large item to mention -- as a potential landmark -- in the 4 search states.

    I believe that no man-made landmarks are used, as the poem is supposed to be able to work for hundreds (if not thousands) of years. I even think that the phrase "within a few steps" was very carefully chosen, so it would act as a hint. Good luck, all.
    Last edited by Old Pilot; 06-09-2021, 02:46 AM.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Old Pilot View Post
    If Forrest truly believed that a good solve of the poem would lead someone to a place within a few steps of the chest, this suggests that the poem was very precise in its directions. And since the possible search areas fill 4 of the United States (less buildings, other structures, outhouses, graveyards, and dangerous places), I strongly believe that some "landmarks" are important in solving the poem. And at least one of them would be fairly small.

    Since a very large lake such as Yellowstone Lake may be thought to "stand out", it may be thought of as being a significant landmark. But it's also huge, so in and of itself, doesn't indicate a small area or narrow search path to follow, BOTG. Please note that I'm not suggesting that this particular lake is part of a good solve. I just couldn't as quickly think of the name of any other large item to mention -- as a potential landmark -- in the 4 search states.

    I believe that no man-made landmarks are used, as the poem is supposed to be able to work for hundreds (if not thousands) of years. I even think that the phrase "within a few steps" was very carefully chosen, so it would act as a hint. Good luck, all.
    I'm thinking you might be stoned!

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Old Pilot View Post
      If Forrest truly believed that a good solve of the poem would lead someone to a place within a few steps of the chest, this suggests that the poem was very precise in its directions. And since the possible search areas fill 4 of the United States (less buildings, other structures, outhouses, graveyards, and dangerous places), I strongly believe that some "landmarks" are important in solving the poem. And at least one of them would be fairly small.

      Since a very large lake such as Yellowstone Lake may be thought to "stand out", it may be thought of as being a significant landmark. But it's also huge, so in and of itself, doesn't indicate a small area or narrow search path to follow, BOTG. Please note that I'm not suggesting that this particular lake is part of a good solve. I just couldn't as quickly think of the name of any other large item to mention -- as a potential landmark -- in the 4 search states.

      I believe that no man-made landmarks are used, as the poem is supposed to be able to work for hundreds (if not thousands) of years. I even think that the phrase "within a few steps" was very carefully chosen, so it would act as a hint. Good luck, all.
      Another well thought out and articulated thread , from a very helpful and positive searcher with an optimistic outlook . Thank you very much Old Pilot .

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      • #4
        Hi Old Pilot. Where did Forrest say that it would lead you within a few steps?

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Old Pilot View Post
          If Forrest truly believed that a good solve of the poem would lead someone to a place within a few steps of the chest, this suggests that the poem was very precise in its directions.
          My approach and solve was based on this idea. I thought there had to be a way that the poem was giving precision. And since Forrest was a pilot, I thought the most logical approach was that the poem is taking us on an orienteering track - like pilot navigation- with compass and distance directions. I easily found those in the poem. For example, in addition to several other meanings, WWWH meant proceed at 212 degrees until you reach the next clue. The end is ever drawing nigh means turn 90 degrees left to the water drawing from bottom of the dam. Water high means go 167 degrees until you find the blaze (the water was normally 167 feet deep). The blaze was where "blaze" mountain can be seen for the first time just over a nearby hill.

          This approach would take you to a precise location - no wondering around - you are going to be within a few steps of the treasure at that point. Precision. And it all worked in NM. And it matched the secret "X" on his map that was there in "spirit" in TFTW, with a perfect home of Brown. The odds seemed to great and the coincidences seemed too many. And I did see intent.

          Phewy. Nonsense. Jack wandered around for 25 days. Of course, with a good blaze would that still be the case? Not sure.

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          • #6
            My opinion is...the poem makes two lines cross. Two lines crossing is precise. Especially when you look at where the lines cross and see a pie-shaped blaze at that location.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Mary Ward View Post
              Hi Old Pilot. Where did Forrest say that it would lead you within a few steps?
              Hi Mary: Forrest didn't explicitly word it that way, but he strongly implied it here:

              Mysterious Writings Periodic Words (6/2/2017): “Let’s coin a new phrase. You can’t have a ‘correct solve’ unless you can knowingly go to within several steps of the treasure chest. Otherwise you have a ‘general solve.’ What do you think? f”

              Link: http://mysteriouswritings.com/period...treasure-hunt/

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              • #8
                Originally posted by TheGoldHunter View Post
                My opinion is...the poem makes two lines cross. Two lines crossing is precise. Especially when you look at where the lines cross and see a pie-shaped blaze at that location.
                I like pi

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Redneck Express View Post

                  I like pi
                  Redneck: I"d give you a buck for your pi... Hillbealy

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Old Pilot View Post
                    If Forrest truly believed that a good solve of the poem would lead someone to a place within a few steps of the chest, this suggests that the poem was very precise in its directions. And since the possible search areas fill 4 of the United States (less buildings, other structures, outhouses, graveyards, and dangerous places), I strongly believe that some "landmarks" are important in solving the poem. And at least one of them would be fairly small.

                    Since a very large lake such as Yellowstone Lake may be thought to "stand out", it may be thought of as being a significant landmark. But it's also huge, so in and of itself, doesn't indicate a small area or narrow search path to follow, BOTG. Please note that I'm not suggesting that this particular lake is part of a good solve. I just couldn't as quickly think of the name of any other large item to mention -- as a potential landmark -- in the 4 search states.

                    I believe that no man-made landmarks are used, as the poem is supposed to be able to work for hundreds (if not thousands) of years. I even think that the phrase "within a few steps" was very carefully chosen, so it would act as a hint. Good luck, all.
                    Types of blazes and natural or man made. What constitutes a natural blaze from a man made blaze? Could most people recognize a natural blaze from a man made blaze?

                    1. Boulder with a natural scar shaped like an X.
                    2. Tree with a scrape on it?
                    3. Firepit, rocks in a circle.
                    4. Cairn, rocks stacked
                    5. Animal Trail
                    6. Tree bent
                    7. Rocks in a line
                    8. River rocks (smooth/rounded) placed on a cliff.
                    Last edited by Walking Among Lions; 06-09-2021, 01:27 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Old Pilot View Post
                      If Forrest truly believed that a good solve of the poem would lead someone to a place within a few steps of the chest, this suggests that the poem was very precise in its directions. And since the possible search areas fill 4 of the United States (less buildings, other structures, outhouses, graveyards, and dangerous places), I strongly believe that some "landmarks" are important in solving the poem. And at least one of them would be fairly small.

                      Since a very large lake such as Yellowstone Lake may be thought to "stand out", it may be thought of as being a significant landmark. But it's also huge, so in and of itself, doesn't indicate a small area or narrow search path to follow, BOTG. Please note that I'm not suggesting that this particular lake is part of a good solve. I just couldn't as quickly think of the name of any other large item to mention -- as a potential landmark -- in the 4 search states.

                      I believe that no man-made landmarks are used, as the poem is supposed to be able to work for hundreds (if not thousands) of years. I even think that the phrase "within a few steps" was very carefully chosen, so it would act as a hint. Good luck, all.
                      But you also can have a quite large landmark pointing with good precision into the direction of the hiding place. Furthermore FF said that google earth is a good search tool. GE allows to go back in history, and see what the man made landmark was between 2010-2020. So I would not a priori exclude man made landmarks.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Zapster View Post

                        Hi Mary: Forrest didn't explicitly word it that way, but he strongly implied it here:

                        Mysterious Writings Periodic Words (6/2/2017): “Let’s coin a new phrase. You can’t have a ‘correct solve’ unless you can knowingly go to within several steps of the treasure chest. Otherwise you have a ‘general solve.’ What do you think? f”

                        Link: http://mysteriouswritings.com/period...treasure-hunt/
                        Thank you.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Only thing really precise in nature would be where 2 rivers meet.
                          Or in the case of the poem a river and a creek.

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                          • #14
                            My solve led me to within a few steps of a location where I thought the treasure might be buried.

                            Instead of “blaze” mountain (what Must Listengood used) I used “blaze” river. The blaze river took me to within 30 feet of a large Ponderosa Pine. The river was slow moving and deep (water high) just upriver from the ponderosa. Since ponderosa means heavy I took that to be heavy loads. The tree stood out because there were only three ponderosas in the area and the next nearest ponderosa was about 5 miles away. Within a few steps of the base of the tree there was a rock pile marking a spot where something had been buried. I knew something was buried there because the dirt was soft. When I probed it with a ski pole the pole went down at least two feet. I couldn’t pick up anything on my metal detector so I was afraid to dig because I thought it might be the gravesite of someone’s dog.

                            I thought my solve had everything. WWWH was the NM fishing regulations line between warm waters and trout waters (this was before it came out that warm waters meant physically warm). My hoB was the monastery because monks wear brown robes (this was before I found out that hoB wasn’t a structure). One of the most popular raft put-ins in NM is just below the monastery. NPFTM was Canada de Fuertes because Fuertes is Spanish for bold and bold is the opposite of meek. The end was the omega shape bend in the river about a mile past Fuertes. Drawing nigh was the draw that comes into the Chama on the left about a quarter mile past the omega shape bend. Your creek was the dry creak bed of the draw. Heavy loads was both the ponderosa and the large boulders from the crumbling hoodoos that had been washed down the draw. Water high referred to both the deeper water upriver and to the Continental Divide (heading up the dry creek led directly to the CD).

                            Except for my hoB, everything seemed to fit perfectly. Now I realize that a lot of people felt the same way about their solve.
                            Last edited by Redneck Girl; 06-09-2021, 03:07 PM.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Zapster View Post

                              Hi Mary: Forrest didn't explicitly word it that way, but he strongly implied it here:

                              Mysterious Writings Periodic Words (6/2/2017): “Let’s coin a new phrase. You can’t have a ‘correct solve’ unless you can knowingly go to within several steps of the treasure chest. Otherwise you have a ‘general solve.’ What do you think? f”

                              Link: http://mysteriouswritings.com/period...treasure-hunt/
                              One has to navigate several steps (stages) in order to solve the poem, so take what he says with a pinch of salt.

                              Having said that, I don't think he walked very far with the treasure.

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