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"It was a striking place with secrets." -- Ernest Schwiebert

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  • #46
    Firsts things first this is NOT the Forrest Fenn solution and it is not one of the better solves.
    It is based on Reddit data base and pretending Forrest lied over and over.
    That being said what will you tell yourself and others when the truth comes out of the reallocation.
    It is one thing to have a solve and say I think it is right,
    But this has been pushed for weeks now and it is wrong.
    I know just one more searcher who thinks they know more than others.
    That knowledge he can't even understand all the time we put in comparing Reddit with other things.
    How could someone know anything about where the chest sat. Wake up call people know the real place just not you.
    This solve takes you from anywhere to nowhere in other words
    You can pick any WWWH and at the end of the solve you have people wondering aimlessly looking for a hole in the ground.
    So for the nine mile hole solve to be correct Forrest lied to everyone and you are telling the truth.
    Last edited by Knowledge; 10-23-2021, 12:54 PM.

    Comment


    • #47
      Originally posted by DanNun
      That place looks familiar! But check out this sweet picture I took of my kids recently! They had so much fun. I got them out into the woods and away from their texting machines and video games! Yeah it was cold there if you couldn’t tell by what they’re wearing.
      $3 million worth of smiles right there.

      Comment


      • #48
        Originally posted by FlyFishBrown View Post

        I agree and all those early stories about NMH being a place everyone was fighting to get into first actually show it shouldn’t be the spot. The Flywater chapter (without getting into a debate about earlier references to the Firehole) reads:

        “Those great places on the Firehole, which were personal secrets to me then, are NOW busy with the flourish of fishermen and women who cast a midge or floating cadis upon the same waters, never knowing I had been there, or even caring yes or no.”

        “How special those hours were, to see the waters deepen into cobalt as the flow slowly bends around a bank or to see a ripple swirl as a brookie takes an unsuspecting mayfly.”

        NMH was already a known, busy fishing location that was not a secret and doesn’t have brook trout. Also notice how the word waters is used as a singular reference to a place FF is fishing (undercuts MJ plural waters argument as WWWH). According to his writings, you can see it doesn’t fit.

        Finally, both FF And Jack spoke about the clues being physical places that exist. The “water high” attribute to the crystalline pond also doesn’t fit. That leaves just “water from above” which is the interpretation of every creek by the very nature of gravity.
        It is obvious in hindsight with 9MH confirmed as the spot that Forrest did consider this location his own special place. If not the fishing hole itself, then certainly the woods on the far bank. His favorite fishing spot may have been elsewhere, but I have no doubt he made a stop here when he was heading back to West Yellowstone where Peggy was waiting for him. He explains it clearly in Flywater. The "note" he wrote for her while sitting under a towering pine along the Madison? It was probably "Ode to Peggy Jean" penned at Nine Mile Hole, which is what makes it so special.to him, not the fishing per se.

        Comment


        • #49
          Originally posted by Vertigo View Post

          Yes, the crystalline pond, hidden from the main hole, sounds idyllic. I could imagine young Forrest fishing at Nine Mile, then deciding to follow the icy rivulet up toward the "tiny paradise" through the lodgepole pines.

          Originally, I thought "end is ever drawing nigh," "no paddle up your your creek," and "heavy loads" worked perfectly with that little rivulet. The problem was I didn't see any water high that way. Knowing now that there once was a shallow, crystalline pond there, it all fits.

          Begin it where warm waters halt (where the Firehole and Gibbon rivers end)
          And take it in the canyon down (Madison Canyon)
          Not far, but too far to walk (Drive)
          Put in below the home of Brown (Nine Mile Hole)

          From there it's no place for the meek (Crossing the Madison)
          The end is ever drawing nigh (The rivulet that drains into Nine Mile Hole)
          There'll be no paddle up your creek (Because it's a tiny rivulet)
          Just heavy loads and water high (Lodgepoles, deadfall, and a crystalline springhead pond)

          The pond does not exist today, and has been gone for nearly 30 years. This makes it tricky to locate its precise location.

          And finally, of course, there's the blaze. I'm still thinking about that one.
          My, my . . . where to start? If you believe that a little rivulet was associated with "heavy loads" . . . please explain how/why, okay?
          If your solve depends on something that's no longer there (such as the crystalline pond -- for "water high"), I suggest you try a different solve. Didn't we expect that this poem could be valid and solvable for hundreds of years? It's not likely that the historical record of that pond would be easily findable.
          And if you're willing to try a different solve, why don't you look up "halt"? It appears that you haven't done that. (And neither have any of the others who have bought into 9MH.)

          Comment


          • #50
            Originally posted by Old Pilot View Post

            My, my . . . where to start? If you believe that a little rivulet was associated with "heavy loads" . . . please explain how/why, okay?
            If your solve depends on something that's no longer there (such as the crystalline pond -- for "water high"), I suggest you try a different solve. Didn't we expect that this poem could be valid and solvable for hundreds of years? It's not likely that the historical record of that pond would be easily findable.
            And if you're willing to try a different solve, why don't you look up "halt"? It appears that you haven't done that. (And neither have any of the others who have bought into 9MH.)
            Not the rivulet but the dry creek: no paddle. The rivulet has water flowing in it so that is NOT your creek. Given a small enough canoe, even a rivulet with a trickle.of water can be paddled. Whereas, the dry creek no longer has water flowing from the former "crystalline/forest pond" that was filled by debris flows (heavy loads) after the 1988 fire. I mistakenly thought it was an earthquake, and the author Schwiebert quoted by OP mistakingly placed the fire in 1992. No matter, the debris at the upper terminus of the dry creek is heavy loads, and the dry creek meets the rivulet near this spot. Thus we have a rare land feature in the form of a dry creek that has water high up it yet no water flows down.

            Warm waters are those tiny spots in cold mountain streams where hot thermal waters mix with the cold current to provide a comfortable temperature for river bathing. There are these spots of warm waters all along the Madison tributaries but they abruptly stop after Terrace Spring.

            Comment


            • #51
              Originally posted by Blazingwaddles View Post

              Not the rivulet but the dry creek: no paddle. The rivulet has water flowing in it so that is NOT your creek. Given a small enough canoe, even a rivulet with a trickle.of water can be paddled. Whereas, the dry creek no longer has water flowing from the former "crystalline/forest pond" that was filled by debris flows (heavy loads) after the 1988 fire. I mistakenly thought it was an earthquake, and the author Schwiebert quoted by OP mistakingly placed the fire in 1992. No matter, the debris at the upper terminus of the dry creek is heavy loads, and the dry creek meets the rivulet near this spot. Thus we have a rare land feature in the form of a dry creek that has water high up it yet no water flows down.

              Warm waters are those tiny spots in cold mountain streams where hot thermal waters mix with the cold current to provide a comfortable temperature for river bathing. There are these spots of warm waters all along the Madison tributaries but they abruptly stop after Terrace Spring.
              Hey waddles,
              Interesting stuff. Do you think that there are any ducks up the dry creek or rivulet? Canoes can be paddled, but not up dry creeks to crystalline ponds. Do ducks waddle over the debris yonder in the upper terminus? Do ducks paddle up yonder up there up that rivulet in that there rare spot? Does a duck waddle or paddle over hill and dale? A duck could fly up on high over there I recon, Forrest did fly in the sky, but how does a "no paddle up your creek" equate to a duck that waddled or flew? I would think that waddle and paddle don't match with flying. Your namesake for heaven sake, it is a duck whose paddle is up that creek. That's what ducks do to swim through the water....they paddle. Cheers.

              Comment


              • #52
                the location or area in general wasn't nine mile hole

                anyone who tells you they have any information confirming it was, isn't telling you the truth

                Comment


                • #53
                  Originally posted by Vertigo View Post

                  Yes, the crystalline pond, hidden from the main hole, sounds idyllic. I could imagine young Forrest fishing at Nine Mile, then deciding to follow the icy rivulet up toward the "tiny paradise" through the lodgepole pines.

                  Originally, I thought "end is ever drawing nigh," "no paddle up your your creek," and "heavy loads" worked perfectly with that little rivulet. The problem was I didn't see any water high that way. Knowing now that there once was a shallow, crystalline pond there, it all fits.

                  Begin it where warm waters halt (where the Firehole and Gibbon rivers end)
                  And take it in the canyon down (Madison Canyon)
                  Not far, but too far to walk (Drive)
                  Put in below the home of Brown (Nine Mile Hole)

                  From there it's no place for the meek (Crossing the Madison)
                  The end is ever drawing nigh (The rivulet that drains into Nine Mile Hole)
                  There'll be no paddle up your creek (Because it's a tiny rivulet)
                  Just heavy loads and water high (Lodgepoles, deadfall, and a crystalline springhead pond)

                  The pond does not exist today, and has been gone for nearly 30 years. This makes it tricky to locate its precise location.

                  And finally, of course, there's the blaze. I'm still thinking about that one.
                  I agree and thanks for reposting Vertigo. The pond is potentially very significant in two possible ways. 1. I believe FF loved that place (pond) so much that he tried to recreate the pond in his backyard in Sante Fe. I always was looking for that place (FF backyard) on my searches. 2. Not far but too far to walk can have two meanings first is yes you drive there but second meaning is drive to a place back in time (FF revelries) that’s too far to walk.

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    Originally posted by Old Pilot View Post

                    My, my . . . where to start? If you believe that a little rivulet was associated with "heavy loads" . . . please explain how/why, okay?
                    If your solve depends on something that's no longer there (such as the crystalline pond -- for "water high"), I suggest you try a different solve. Didn't we expect that this poem could be valid and solvable for hundreds of years? It's not likely that the historical record of that pond would be easily findable.
                    And if you're willing to try a different solve, why don't you look up "halt"? It appears that you haven't done that. (And neither have any of the others who have bought into 9MH.)
                    You replied to a comment that was made more than 13 months ago. Please try to keep up.
                    Heavy loads in that interpretation referred to the lodgepole pines that lay fallen across the rivulet. Please read more carefully.
                    That interpretation was not my solve. It was, however, an interesting alternative that I put forth for consideration and discussion.

                    My solve is the one that kicked off the forum topic titled Everything But The Blaze -- Madison (Nine Mile Hole)So I won't be trying a different solve Mr. Pilot, thank you. As far as "halt" is concerned, you may want to revisit what I demonstrated to you long ago.

                    It sounds like you can use the refresher.

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      Originally posted by Ozzy View Post

                      I agree and thanks for reposting Vertigo. The pond is potentially very significant in two possible ways. 1. I believe FF loved that place (pond) so much that he tried to recreate the pond in his backyard in Sante Fe. I always was looking for that place (FF backyard) on my searches. 2. Not far but too far to walk can have two meanings first is yes you drive there but second meaning is drive to a place back in time (FF revelries) that’s too far to walk.
                      Could be ... there is no mention in Marvin's fishing logs of the icy rivulet or forest pond, so Forrest's father apparently never went there (at least between 1946 and 1960). So that preserves the "alone in there" aspect that Jack thought was so impotant even before he found the chest e.g. on Toby's podcast. Marvin probably wasn't interested in anything like that; not so much into daydreaming as Bubba apparently.

                      This backstory is all speculation of course. But what is fact, is that if you head high up the dry creek you will (in about a quarter mile) run into the wet creek that still carries the water from the cold spring to this day. Debris flows (heavy loads) may have filled the forest pond but there is still water high up there. Strange that it doesn't flow down the dry creek .... not many places like that in the Rocky Mountains, I reckon.

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        Even thou i didn't like NMH. The huge Yellowstone fire in 1988 being at the same time Ff was told he didn't have a good chance of surviving cancer. I'm sure triggered those memories of youthful bliss. And with his secret location being destroyed it felt like a loss. he decided then that is where he wanted to die. He doesn't describe to many other exact places as paradise that he would reflect on as special . where the real spot was it had to be of major significance to him pre 88.

                        Comment


                        • #57
                          Originally posted by Sunburnt1 View Post
                          Even thou i didn't like NMH. The huge Yellowstone fire in 1988 being at the same time Ff was told he didn't have a good chance of surviving cancer. I'm sure triggered those memories of youthful bliss. And with his secret location being destroyed it felt like a loss. he decided then that is where he wanted to die. He doesn't describe to many other exact places as paradise that he would reflect on as special . where the real spot was it had to be of major significance to him pre 88.
                          I disagree that Forrest's secret place was ever destroyed, but that is because I do not believe it to be in YNP.

                          https://www.hintofriches.com/forum/t...-clue-1-biwwwh

                          Good luck.
                          Tim

                          Comment


                          • #58
                            Originally posted by Sunburnt1 View Post
                            Even thou i didn't like NMH. The huge Yellowstone fire in 1988 being at the same time Ff was told he didn't have a good chance of surviving cancer. I'm sure triggered those memories of youthful bliss. And with his secret location being destroyed it felt like a loss. he decided then that is where he wanted to die. He doesn't describe to many other exact places as paradise that he would reflect on as special . where the real spot was it had to be of major significance to him pre 88.
                            Yes this could be right ... my reasonimg for the blaze being a tree that survived the 1988 fire, and then probably the lightning that struck it, is the unrelatable (to others) emotional attachment Forrest the cancer survivor developed for that spot. The dreamy pond being destroyed by nature fits right into that theme very nicely.

                            Comment


                            • #59
                              Originally posted by Blazingwaddles View Post

                              Not the rivulet but the dry creek: no paddle. The rivulet has water flowing in it so that is NOT your creek. Given a small enough canoe, even a rivulet with a trickle.of water can be paddled. Whereas, the dry creek no longer has water flowing from the former "crystalline/forest pond" that was filled by debris flows (heavy loads) after the 1988 fire. I mistakenly thought it was an earthquake, and the author Schwiebert quoted by OP mistakingly placed the fire in 1992. No matter, the debris at the upper terminus of the dry creek is heavy loads, and the dry creek meets the rivulet near this spot. Thus we have a rare land feature in the form of a dry creek that has water high up it yet no water flows down.

                              Warm waters are those tiny spots in cold mountain streams where hot thermal waters mix with the cold current to provide a comfortable temperature for river bathing. There are these spots of warm waters all along the Madison tributaries but they abruptly stop after Terrace Spring.
                              “The end is ever approaching nigh”. Semicolon. “There’ll be no paddle up your creek.” A dry creek is not “ever approaching”. That rules out the dry creek and downed timber as heavy loads to fit the poem in the area

                              Sorry. Not buying it.



                              Comment


                              • #60
                                Originally posted by Blazingwaddles View Post

                                Yes this could be right ... my reasonimg for the blaze being a tree that survived the 1988 fire, and then probably the lightning that struck it, is the unrelatable (to others) emotional attachment Forrest the cancer survivor developed for that spot. The dreamy pond being destroyed by nature fits right into that theme very nicely.
                                The chest was not found there, the solution is a joke, and one more level of insult to the creator. If that is what you think of Forrest Fenn, just tell yourself there was no chest. Because he would have had to lie about just about everything for nine mile to be the location. You are being convinced by shadows who feel you don't need the truth. The truth is, the real location shows Forrest did not lie or cheat. So do not let lawyers and people who are working for someone or dumb as a box of rocks, take away what you know in your heart. That f was a straight shooter when it came to the chase. That nine mile is nothing more than a failed search effort. I am telling you FACTS. The FACT confirmed by Forrest that the chest was found on the Laramie river.
                                All the solvers, who can't see never will, because they do not care about what Forrest did it is about their solve, and they have closed their minds.

                                If anyone thinks Forrest Fenn would not let the solver of his poem know they solved it, they are kidding themselves. I would understand before the find him not saying a word. Once that chest was gone, he wanted it solved more than anyone knows.

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