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What is the second clue in the poem?

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  • #31
    Guess I was wrong for the 349,998 people that were looking that all had different ideas about the treasure location and now that the location that Forrest couldn't keep the location secret any more he decided to create more controversy by giving the treasure to Jack (YES JACK< CALL ME OUT SUE ME PLEASE, I RELISH THE THOUGHT) you didn't find crap and you damn well know it and I will only speak louder to the masses. I was the one that found everything even if others don't believe

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    • #32
      Originally posted by Bird1432 View Post
      Guess I was wrong for the 349,998 people that were looking that all had different ideas about the treasure location and now that the location that Forrest couldn't keep the location secret any more he decided to create more controversy by giving the treasure to Jack (YES JACK< CALL ME OUT SUE ME PLEASE, I RELISH THE THOUGHT) you didn't find crap and you damn well know it and I will only speak louder to the masses. I was the one that found everything even if others don't believe
      Yeah... right. We believe you. And next you tell us you are a Gynecologist too. Am I right?
      Last edited by Tornado; 05-04-2021, 06:26 AM.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by Redneck Girl View Post
        I think most people agree that the first clue is WWWH, but what about the second? There seem to be two schools of thought. Some people think that the nine clues are a combination of locations and directions, while others think that the nine clues refer to only locations that you can mark on a map.

        For the locations/directions people the second clue is most likely “take it in the canyon down”. For the locations only people the second clue is either put in or hoB.

        I think this is one of the most important quotes from Forrest regarding this issue:
        “There are several people that have deciphered the first two clues. I don’t think they knew it, because they walked right on past the treasure chest.”
        Notice how he said “walked”. If you’re in your car at WWWH and “canyon down” tells you to go down a canyon, then you are most likely still in your car. If canyon down is the second clue, then how is it that searchers walked by the treasure? Did people park at WWWH and start walking from there? Since the next line tells us that the distance is TFTW, this doesn’t make any sense.

        There’s also this:
        "If you knew the geographic location of each clue it would be map to the treasure”
        This seems to say that the clues are locations only.

        If the clues are locations only, then the first location is WWWH. Forrest said there are three or four clues in the second stanza. After WWWH the next clue location you come to is “put in”. That would make the third clue location, the one that only Jack figured out, the hoB.

        From WWWH we are supposed to go down a canyon. This is a direction. NF,BTFTW tells us how far down the canyon to go, so it is also a directional clue. If “put in” is the location where you park then the next clue location is hoB. The two-clue solvers found the correct parking place. After that they got out of their car and walked right past the treasure without going to hoB.
        So far, I think the second clue is 'Not far, but too far to walk.' This is the bottleneck Jack is referring to...the part of the poem that seemed most like a riddle to him.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by RahRah View Post
          One doesn't end a sentence with a colon; Forrest even did a video stating as much. The sentence preceding the poem is part of what must be solved, it tells us how - precisely - that is conforming strictly to an exact pattern or standard : shaped, arranged, or performed with minute conformity to a pattern. The use of the word "precisely" is setting our boundaries, leaving us with answers characterized by a definite meaning : devoid of anything vague, equivocal, or uncertain. The poem is NOT a guessing game, there is a pattern and it has to be followed from start to finish, that is why figuring out where warm waters halt is critical, without it, you really have nothing to work with going forward. With that in mind, now consider what you're working with...

          So I wrote a poem containing nine clues that if followed precisely, will lead to the end of my rainbow and the treasure:

          As I have gone alone in there
          And with my treasures bold,
          I can keep my secret where,
          And hint of riches new and old.

          Begin it where warm waters halt
          And take it in the canyon down,
          Not far, but too far to walk.

          Put in below the home of Brown.

          From there it’s no place for the meek,
          The end is drawing ever nigh;
          There’ll be no paddle up your creek,
          Just heavy loads and water high.

          If you’ve been wise and found the blaze,
          Look quickly down, your quest to cease,
          But tarry scant with marvel gaze,
          Just take the chest and go in peace.

          So why is it that I must go
          And leave my trove for all to seek?

          The answer I already know
          I’ve done it tired, and now I’m weak.

          So hear me all and listen good,
          Your effort will be worth the cold.

          If you are brave and in the wood
          I give you title to the gold.
          I'm curious as to what this as a clue:

          'So why is it that I must go
          And leave my trove for all to seek?'


          means to you . . .?

          I'm not of the opinion that punctuation is a reliable meter for deciphering the arrangement of the poem/clues entirely. Mainly because Fenn did some eccentric things with punctuation and often bragged about an excessively long caption in one of his books. Yet, I'm not completely closed to the idea.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by Notable Canon View Post

            I'm curious as to what this as a clue:

            'So why is it that I must go
            And leave my trove for all to seek?'


            means to you . . .?

            I'm not of the opinion that punctuation is a reliable meter for deciphering the arrangement of the poem/clues entirely. Mainly because Fenn did some eccentric things with punctuation and often bragged about an excessively long caption in one of his books. Yet, I'm not completely closed to the idea.
            Ah, I didn't say it was a clue, I simply set things up based on punctuation following the colon in the sentence before the poem and noted that's what we're working with.
            To be right for someone, you have to be willing to be wrong for someone else.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by RahRah View Post
              One doesn't end a sentence with a colon; Forrest even did a video stating as much. The sentence preceding the poem is part of what must be solved, it tells us how - precisely - that is conforming strictly to an exact pattern or standard : shaped, arranged, or performed with minute conformity to a pattern. The use of the word "precisely" is setting our boundaries, leaving us with answers characterized by a definite meaning : devoid of anything vague, equivocal, or uncertain. The poem is NOT a guessing game, there is a pattern and it has to be followed from start to finish, that is why figuring out where warm waters halt is critical, without it, you really have nothing to work with going forward. With that in mind, now consider what you're working with...

              So I wrote a poem containing nine clues that if followed precisely, will lead to the end of my rainbow and the treasure:

              As I have gone alone in there
              And with my treasures bold,
              I can keep my secret where,
              And hint of riches new and old.

              Begin it where warm waters halt
              And take it in the canyon down,
              Not far, but too far to walk.

              Put in below the home of Brown.

              From there it’s no place for the meek,
              The end is drawing ever nigh;
              There’ll be no paddle up your creek,
              Just heavy loads and water high.

              If you’ve been wise and found the blaze,
              Look quickly down, your quest to cease,
              But tarry scant with marvel gaze,
              Just take the chest and go in peace.

              So why is it that I must go
              And leave my trove for all to seek?

              The answer I already know
              I’ve done it tired, and now I’m weak.

              So hear me all and listen good,
              Your effort will be worth the cold.

              If you are brave and in the wood
              I give you title to the gold.
              I partially agree. The colon does mean we should follow precisely what comes next or what follows the colon. But a person can end a sentence with a colon and still be grammatically correct. Just can’t be an incomplete sentence or fragment. Full disclosure, I was never good at grammar so I looked that one up.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by Ozzy View Post

                I partially agree. The colon does mean we should follow precisely what comes next or what follows the colon. But a person can end a sentence with a colon and still be grammatically correct. Just can’t be an incomplete sentence or fragment. Full disclosure, I was never good at grammar so I looked that one up.
                Partly correct - I am good with grammar so I'll explain a bit more...you cannot end a sentence with a colon unless you are doing so to draw attention to what follow the colon, and what follows a colon is something you are announcing, introducing, or directing attention to as a list, a noun or noun phrase, a quotation, or an example/explanation. To be grammatically correct something must follow the colon that completes the intent in the use of the colon.

                For example:

                I bought a lot of meat at the store: bacon, turkey, chicken, and tuna. Then I went home and put it away. <---Grammatically correct
                I bought a lot of meat at the store: Then I went home and put it away. <---Grammatically incorrect.

                The first example, a list follows the colon, the second is just wrong because the colon indicates something more should follow (in the example, a list) and without that something more, it's wrong. The sentence before the poem in TTOTC works that same way, the colon draws attention to what follows it, it is not the end of the sentence (end of the thought), but leading to what is next.
                To be right for someone, you have to be willing to be wrong for someone else.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by RahRah View Post

                  Partly correct - I am good with grammar so I'll explain a bit more...you cannot end a sentence with a colon unless you are doing so to draw attention to what follow the colon, and what follows a colon is something you are announcing, introducing, or directing attention to as a list, a noun or noun phrase, a quotation, or an example/explanation. To be grammatically correct something must follow the colon that completes the intent in the use of the colon.

                  For example:

                  I bought a lot of meat at the store: bacon, turkey, chicken, and tuna. Then I went home and put it away. <---Grammatically correct
                  I bought a lot of meat at the store: Then I went home and put it away. <---Grammatically incorrect.

                  The first example, a list follows the colon, the second is just wrong because the colon indicates something more should follow (in the example, a list) and without that something more, it's wrong. The sentence before the poem in TTOTC works that same way, the colon draws attention to what follows it, it is not the end of the sentence (end of the thought), but leading to what is next.
                  Yes, that’s the part I agree with. Simplified - There are nine clues you must follow precisely: poem with nine clues. The result of precisely following the nine clues is a treasure chest and the end of Forrest’s rainbow.

                  if I am missing something, let me know, as I am attempting to fully understand your statement and always reserve the right to get smarter.

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by 1&Only1Trailblazer View Post
                    Take it in the canyon down is 1 clue with two directions, you go down too the canyon from WWWH. You also go in that canyon, traveling in the canyon is not possible, Russell Osborne couldn’t make it down or up in horseback. Thats the reason Forrest took a sedan, not only is it to far too walk its 20 miles...
                    Actually, not 20 ,but '20/10= TOO !' (As u no !).

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Redneck Girl View Post
                      Can a little girl in India, who speaks good English, but only has your poem and a map of the US Rocky Mountains, work out where the treasure is?
                      Does this hint that she needs TTOTC? If hoB is the third clue, then is it something in the book? Did Jack say anything about a possible hint for hoB in TTOTC?
                      Yes. RG. Jack said he figured that one out from home, so it's all probably in the book, especially since Jack said there's even a hint for the blaze in the book.

                      I can't remember the exact question or answer, but someone, a journalist I think, once read that second stanza and F responded "sounds like 3 or 4 clues to me." So there's probably 3-4 clues in that second stanza.

                      What's funny is if we say by line 8 there are at least four clues.... there's a lot of room in the poem for the other five clues.

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