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Everything But The Blaze -- Madison (Nine Mile Hole)

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  • Originally posted by thehomeofBrown.com View Post

    "River Bathing is Best" was first posted to Forrest's blog on July 18, 2011. This story was available to searchers long before TFTW was released.
    That is interesting. I didn't know that. Did you compare the original story with the one in TFTW?

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    • Originally posted by Vertigo View Post
      I admit that I'm a little averse to word play in the poem interpretation, so the modified acrostic made less of an impression on me, but that wasn't critical to your starting location, anyway.
      I'm curious as to why you have an aversion to wordplay? I feel like the poem and TTOTC are drenched with wordplay.

      An example of the kind of wordplay I think he is using.

      The children couldn't understand why it was cold. The temperature is a thought in their heads. Warm is subjective. Begin it where head waters halt.
      like the sheriff who told the outlaw he was going to hang him with a new rope because he respected him so much. -The thought that counts?
      old/memory-thought and new/reality-physical.

      I only started looking at it this way after considering bias. This entire thread is a pile of bias. Poem, book, map-poem,book, map back and forth. He will lead you to his favorite fishing hole and memory. Don't guess it and force fit.

      Of course I ain't got no stinking chest either!!

      Last edited by Fullpress; 06-04-2021, 09:23 PM.

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      • Originally posted by Fullpress View Post

        I'm curious as to why you have an aversion to wordplay? I feel like the poem and TTOTC are drenched with wordplay.
        I should have been more specific. There are forms of wordplay that I have no problem with: rhyming, alliteration, metaphors, irony, idioms, neologisms, puns, slang, etc. These and others are used by writers either to amuse, or to reinforce meaning. By contrast, things like anagrams, acrostics, chronograms, homophones, or homophonic translation are used to conceal meaning. These are the forms of wordplay that I'm averse to, as I feel they violate Forrest's statements that, "the poem is straight forward with no subterfuge in sight," or, "everything about my poem and my book is straightforward."

        Comment


        • Originally posted by Vertigo View Post

          I should have been more specific. There are forms of wordplay that I have no problem with: rhyming, alliteration, metaphors, irony, idioms, neologisms, puns, slang, etc. These and others are used by writers either to amuse, or to reinforce meaning. By contrast, things like anagrams, acrostics, chronograms, homophones, or homophonic translation are used to conceal meaning. These are the forms of wordplay that I'm averse to, as I feel they violate Forrest's statements that, "the poem is straight forward with no subterfuge in sight," or, "everything about my poem and my book is straightforward."
          I mean its a hidden treasure map. By definition there is subterfuge. Its just not in sight. I think it's in the head/thought/memory.

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          • Originally posted by Fullpress View Post

            I mean its a hidden treasure map. By definition there is subterfuge. Its just not in sight. I think it's in the head/thought/memory.
            In TTOTC, when he’s alone, he’s ‘in his head’—in the secret treasure vault of his mind.

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            • Originally posted by Lady V View Post

              In TTOTC, when he’s alone, he’s ‘in his head’—in the secret treasure vault of his mind.
              Lots of tricks in his vault imo. We don't actually need anything Brown to go to just a place below it. Put N below HOB, Home of Brown/N. Home of Brow. skull ridge. A person, place and thing. Is that subterfuge in sight or in the head?
              "Mr. Fenn your son called me an old bat."
              Father her story isn't exactly right. 'my father says you're an old bat.'
              He remembered.. sick substitute
              I'm not all sure this is correct. But the process has no bias relies only on book, poem, map. Which is why I think we have all boned it up.

              Comment


              • Originally posted by Vertigo View Post

                The bigger problem for a geyser or hot spring as WWWH is that there are hundreds of them in Yellowstone. One would have to justify the choice of an individual thermal feature over hundreds of others.
                A while back Zapster pointed out that a child would say warm waters meant Yellowstone. I always liked that idea. I'll go one step further and say that when you mention Yellowstone to a child the first thing they think of is Old Faithful. That's the one thing I remember from visiting the park when I was a kid. Old Faithful stands out because it's the most well known feature in Yellowstone.

                In the chapter "In Love with Yellowstone" Forrest uses the word faithful to describe the family's old car. Also, the word old is the last word in the poem before Begin.

                I'm not saying that Old Faithful is WWWH. There are obviously problems with this choice. The water is hot, it’s hard to explain how it halts, and the canyon doesn’t start until much further downriver. However I do think it's a possibility that we should consider.

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                • Originally posted by Redneck Girl View Post

                  A while back Zapster pointed out that a child would say warm waters meant Yellowstone. I always liked that idea. I'll go one step further and say that when you mention Yellowstone to a child the first thing they think of is Old Faithful. That's the one thing I remember from visiting the park when I was a kid. Old Faithful stands out because it's the most well known feature in Yellowstone.

                  In the chapter "In Love with Yellowstone" Forrest uses the word faithful to describe the family's old car. Also, the word old is the last word in the poem before Begin.

                  I'm not saying that Old Faithful is WWWH. There are obviously problems with this choice. The water is hot, it’s hard to explain how it halts, and the canyon doesn’t start until much further downriver. However I do think it's a possibility that we should consider.
                  I think there is something in that chapter due to teaching followed by him not understanding old/new. Could easily be Old Faithful. But it feels like it should have to do with replacing something with something. Maybe its Old faithful with something else. Some play on vehicle/mode of transportation. Hot rod with something?

                  Hot rod with hot rod. I think he's telling you the blaze will move. And how, it's gonna be a race!
                  Last edited by Fullpress; 06-05-2021, 12:02 AM.

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                  • Originally posted by Vertigo View Post

                    Thanks Zapster, it was refreshing to read a level-headed post following some of the bile that recently seeped into this thread. You were shrewd to consider the totality of Yellowstone's thermal features, and you found a reasonable interpretation of where they halt. I appreciate how you then pinpointed a starting point, based on the intersection of a canyon with the YNP border. I admit that I'm a little averse to word play in the poem interpretation, so the modified acrostic made less of an impression on me, but that wasn't critical to your starting location, anyway.

                    Given the strong consideration that you gave to the totality of Yellowstone's thermal features, what do you see as the shortcoming of Madison Junction? After all, the vast majority of Yellowstone's thermal waters converge there, providing both the totality (or near totality) that we seek, along with a specific location.

                    Cheers
                    You make a fair point that Madison Junction serves as the gateway for the two main exit branches of thermal waters in the park -- a unique beginning point through which the majority of YNP's thermal waters funnel (though it does exclude a lot of eastern hot springs north of Yellowstone Lake). Where I see shortcomings are that the "canyon down" doesn't begin right there -- it's further downstream -- so I preferred Gallatin Canyon's clue-continuity. I also could find no unambiguous interpretation for "Not far, but too far to walk," whereas I felt I had a fantastic answer for that using the first letters of the first six creeks draining into the Gallatin.

                    I could find no satisfying "home of Brown" in Madison Canyon, whereas I felt Tepee Creek in Gallatin Canyon covered both the Brown part and the home part. Having the poem's "put in" serve as both a verb (instruction) and a noun (a literal boat put-in) contributed to my confidence in my interpretation, and also my reluctance to consider alternatives like Madison Canyon.

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                    • Happy June 6th everyone! I'm not certain that this is the creek at Nine Mile Hole, but I have reason to believe that it's possible. The photo is from 2010.

                      Click image for full size (3072 x 4096)

                      Click image for larger version  Name:	UpYourCreek.jpg Views:	15 Size:	4.19 MB ID:	299828
                      Last edited by Vertigo; 06-06-2021, 05:07 PM.

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                      • Originally posted by Vertigo View Post
                        Happy June 6th everyone! I'm not certain that this is the creek at Nine Mile Hole, but I have reason to believe that it's possible. The photo is from 2010.
                        Maybe that's where FF stored his fishing gear.

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by Cary_Galloway View Post

                          Maybe that's where FF stored his fishing gear.
                          Maybe. It looks like a pretty good spot to hide some fishing gear, a Dr. Pepper, or even a treasure chest.

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by Vertigo View Post
                            Happy June 6th everyone! I'm not certain that this is the creek at Nine Mile Hole, but I have reason to believe that it's possible. The photo is from 2010.

                            Click image for full size (3072 x 4096)

                            Click image for larger version Name:	UpYourCreek.jpg Views:	15 Size:	4.19 MB ID:	299828
                            Thanks for sharing. It looks possible. Can't wait for some real video. Is there anything left of the pond? If so, surely the blaze would be around there.

                            I have a feeling some video was taken today.

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                            • So where those trees replanted by people after the fire or is that all nature?
                              Maybe it was replanted and maybe they had to chop down some of the old trees. Kindof like the last picture in TTOTC.

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                              • Originally posted by Cary_Galloway View Post
                                So where those trees replanted by people after the fire or is that all nature?
                                Maybe it was replanted and maybe they had to chop down some of the old trees. Kindof like the last picture in TTOTC.
                                They all grew back naturally, I presume. Lodgepole pines rely on fire for their cones to open and release seeds.

                                Some of the fallen logs in that photo have square ends, as if they were cut. I'm not sure what to make of that.

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