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What were the slip ups in your opinion?

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  • #16
    Originally posted by 1&Only1Trailblazer View Post
    He wasn’t talking about GeorgeStrait.
    I can still make Cheyenne

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    • #17
      He did say “right” strait to it. The reason he said right has to do with Osborne Russell, Osborne called the left side right and the right side left. Forrest knew that by memory of the places Osborne had been, because like following Lewis and Clark he had to have followed Osborne Russell as well. A lot of those old western movies were based on the stories of Osborne Russell, not Lewis and Clark.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Superserioussearcher View Post
        I think one slip was the mention of grizzly bears

        The other may have been when he said

        ”sit under a tree and eat your sandwich” he said “sit there for an hour and watch the eagles and the ospreys and fish rising for mosquitos or mayflies or caddis”.
        It's hard to tell whether a hint or tease is really a slip up. I was looking for the story about Forrest being punched in the face by the "cowboy". I don't think it was a true story, by the way, but wanted
        to see it again anyway. I'm convinced it was a hint or tease. I'll have another example of something similarly telling a bit later.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by 1&Only1Trailblazer View Post
          I can walk strait to it from HOB
          The first four lines can be solved from home, the rest is botg.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by My Chase Quest View Post
            Today show when he started to say 7 thousand feet instead of 5 thousand.
            That doesn’t matter, doesn’t change anything.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Not4but242Walk View Post
              "What is wrong with me just riding my bike out there and throwing it in the water high when I am through with it?" -f

              "The only areas that restrict mountain bikes are the Cloud Peak Wilderness."
              source: Bighorn National Forest - Bicycling:Mountain Biking (usda.gov)
              Nothing is wrong with it. That’s the answer. Unless there is no road down into the canyon, but if you pay attention, the poem tells you that there is a road.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Walking Among Lions View Post
                This one did it for me "I know what the question is. I don’t think earth can hurt it, under the right conditions wind might affect it, it’s probably already wet, and look at what fire did to the twin towers. Nature makes her own rules, James, so I try to not be absolute when talking about her."
                Wind can’t effect the actual chest, but wind can make trees fall over this covering the blaze and further concealing its location.

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                • #23
                  I mentioned it in another place, but the NM tourism video, and the Moby Dickens interview, I thought I heard "too FOR to walk". Also, I asked Jack if Dad from Texas could get there in his pick up truck with "a tank of gas" from the nearest Texas location to the chest. I forgot the aprox mileage I asked about figuring 2010ish miles per gallon numbers. He said he never thought of it like that but didn't want to say yay or nay.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Walking Among Lions View Post
                    Here's another that was also helpful -"For instance, I never said I buried the chest, I said only that I hid it. That is not to say it is not buried, so maybe we need to define the terms. Does ‘hidden’ mean in plain sight? What is the difference between ‘buried,’ ‘entombed’ and ‘sepultured’? What does the word ‘blaze’ in the poem mean? A horse can have a blaze on its forehead, a blaze can be scraped on a tree to mark one’s way, a blaze can mean a flame or a scar on a rock. And what about ‘water high’? Does it mean deep, or higher than normal?”
                    I’m not going to get into this stuff, it’s dangerous and I’m sworn to eternal secrecy.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by 1&Only1Trailblazer View Post
                      He said strait to it from HOB and he spelled straight, strait, which is water between to land masses!
                      That is correct my friend, a stream between two big ass land masses!

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by 1&Only1Trailblazer View Post
                        He did say “right” strait to it. The reason he said right has to do with Osborne Russell, Osborne called the left side right and the right side left. Forrest knew that by memory of the places Osborne had been, because like following Lewis and Clark he had to have followed Osborne Russell as well. A lot of those old western movies were based on the stories of Osborne Russell, not Lewis and Clark.
                        He would’ve said “I could walk right to it”, he added strait so you know that your following the stream. The stream turns into a dry creek (no paddle), heavy loads are the stones in the creek bed, and water high is the high water table. Really straight forward if you ask me, but I’m no “expert”.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Old Pilot View Post

                          It's hard to tell whether a hint or tease is really a slip up. I was looking for the story about Forrest being punched in the face by the "cowboy". I don't think it was a true story, by the way, but wanted
                          to see it again anyway. I'm convinced it was a hint or tease. I'll have another example of something similarly telling a bit later.
                          That’s a good one, let me do a little research real fast and see if I can find the answer, after all, “these stories are as true to history as one man can figure out”. Let’s see how long it takes me!

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Old Pilot View Post

                            I don't disagree, but as this forum evolves, it should be apparent that it's not solely about the treasure hunt. I take it all for what I think it's worth, and try not to spend too much time with items that
                            don't interest me (like long talk videos or music videos of any length).
                            If you really want to rogue on time-wasters, you need to argue with Chase content creators- they're creating bigger wastes than any music is...

                            Originally posted by 1&Only1Trailblazer View Post
                            He said strait to it from HOB and he spelled straight, strait, which is water between to land masses!
                            In my opinion, this is the best slip-up, if he actually released it as written info with the word strait. "Right strait to it" could be powerful help, but let's not take that to be as powerful as any single solved, known clue in the poem, because you'd have to be on the right right strait, and even THAT could take a hundred years to get right...

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Meander
                              I wonder about a small and possibly insignificant detail the 2015 interview released by Jack Stuef in Dec/2020. There is a lot of information in this interview. I’m having trouble reconciling when Forrest met Peggy with their wedding date. In the interview, Peggy, his greatest treasure, is 17. They marry seven or eight years later. In TTotC, beside a photo of a beaming Forrest and Peggy, is the wedding date- Dec. 27, 1953. Forrest would be 23 and Peggy 21. Does this make sense?
                              There is no record of December 27, 1953 being their wedding day. I know that’s the date in TTOTC, but there is no record I’ve been able to find for that date.
                              To be right for someone, you have to be willing to be wrong for someone else.

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                              • #30
                                No slip ups. Forrest got tired of us dunces, so kept throwing us bones.

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