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  • Slough creek

    Read flywater and watch this video


  • #2
    Thanks for posting the video. Getting chased up a tree by a Bull Moose and then getting stuck in quicksand and having to walk four miles with only one shoe all sounds pretty traumatic for a young kid. It's probably something he'd remember.
    I don't know what to think about Slough Creek. If that was the area then what was WWWH? Was WWWH somewhere along the Lamar River and then "your creek" was Slough Creek? Or was WWWH near the Montana Border and "canyon down" was Slough Creek? I thought we decided that "warm" referred to the temperature of the water. I'll have to spend more time thinking about this.

    Comment


    • #3
      Like Forrest said, Slough creek is a hugely popular fly fishing area - guides take you there and even pack in there and stay overnight. But I suppose there are plenty of places off the creek that are very rarely if ever visited.

      It seems to me that the HOB in this case is the one that many suspected early on - the Lamar Valley Ranger Station, Home of the Park Ranger Brown 50+ years ago. Not sure.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Must Listengood View Post
        Like Forrest said, Slough creek is a hugely popular fly fishing area - guides take you there and even pack in there and stay overnight. But I suppose there are plenty of places off the creek that are very rarely if ever visited.

        It seems to me that the HOB in this case is the one that many suspected early on - the Lamar Valley Ranger Station, Home of the Park Ranger Brown 50+ years ago. Not sure.
        Then was the Lamar Valley WWWH? Possibly where the Lamar River reaches Hwy 212?
        If so, then this might hint at the narrative.
        The Lamar Valley was the Secluded Valley of Osborne Russel.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Redneck Girl View Post

          Then was the Lamar Valley WWWH? Possibly where the Lamar River reaches Hwy 212?
          If so, then this might hint at the narrative.
          The Lamar Valley was the Secluded Valley of Osborne Russel.
          I would think that Soda Butte, the extinct geyser, or somewhere on warm creek, maybe where it goes under 212? or something like that is WWWH. I believe that area is probably on edge of the caldera and there may be a spot there were there just aren't anymore warm waters. It all stops in that area.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Redneck Girl View Post
            Thanks for posting the video. Getting chased up a tree by a Bull Moose and then getting stuck in quicksand and having to walk four miles with only one shoe all sounds pretty traumatic for a young kid. It's probably something he'd remember.
            I don't know what to think about Slough Creek. If that was the area then what was WWWH? Was WWWH somewhere along the Lamar River and then "your creek" was Slough Creek? Or was WWWH near the Montana Border and "canyon down" was Slough Creek? I thought we decided that "warm" referred to the temperature of the water. I'll have to spend more time thinking about this.
            WWWH for that would be the point where warm water begins to boil. 212 degrees. Highway 212 begins at Tower Junction, which looks cool cause it's a literal X by the tower. Id say "it" is the Yellowstone River and the solve truly starts where the Yellowstone intersects with 212. 212 has confirmers really. 2-12. The out of work Texan family with 12 kids. I can see HoB being Buffalo Creek by the campground area, where you're forced to get in Slough Creek to continue up it, and/or put in to go to the other side.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Must Listengood View Post

              I would think that Soda Butte, the extinct geyser, or somewhere on warm creek, maybe where it goes under 212? or something like that is WWWH. I believe that area is probably on edge of the caldera and there may be a spot there were there just aren't anymore warm waters. It all stops in that area.
              Could be this as well. The jet drawing page seems to hint at this a bit, with a geyser looking thing and a down arrow.

              Comment


              • #8
                Gold Frogs in the chest.
                Gotta be Slough Creek guys. Remember him catching and eating frogs there.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by CardanoBlockchain View Post

                  WWWH for that would be the point where warm water begins to boil. 212 degrees. Highway 212 begins at Tower Junction, which looks cool cause it's a literal X by the tower. Id say "it" is the Yellowstone River and the solve truly starts where the Yellowstone intersects with 212. 212 has confirmers really. 2-12. The out of work Texan family with 12 kids. I can see HoB being Buffalo Creek by the campground area, where you're forced to get in Slough Creek to continue up it, and/or put in to go to the other side.
                  I said this in the Heavy Loads & Water High thread as well, but 212 has always been my WWWH, owing to the fact that the MT parts were also designated as Rte 32 and 110 degrees longitude (FDA defines warm waters as 90-109 degrees F) runs through it just east of the NE entrance, so that's is my exact beginning point. Some would say Warm Creek could be as well.

                  My HoB was actually about 10 miles down the canyon heading the other way, towards Cody, so I don't have one for Slough Creek. However, my best NPFTM interpreation is to head due north from the put in due to the Longfellow poem "Hammer of Thor." That would work for Slough Creek once you had HoB nailed down.

                  Unlike the GPS solve, this one is intriguing to me. It might have legs.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Must Listengood View Post

                    I would think that Soda Butte, the extinct geyser, or somewhere on warm creek, maybe where it goes under 212? or something like that is WWWH. I believe that area is probably on edge of the caldera and there may be a spot there were there just aren't anymore warm waters. It all stops in that area.
                    That makes sense.
                    If the Lamar Valley Ranger Station was hoB, then "put-in below the hoB" would have been the turn-off up Slough Creek. No place for the meek means you're driving a dirt road (I think it's dirt but I'm not sure) and "the end" would be the campground at the end of the road. Since you know that you have to be "in the wood", that hints at the forested area upriver from the campground. No paddle up your creek means you have to go up it on foot. "Heavy loads and water high" could refer to McBride Lake (thanks to DanNun for pointing this out on a different thread) or the marshy area (slough means marsh) along the creek.
                    If this is the right area then Forrest probably parked at the campground and walked about 0.5-1.0 miles up the creek before going into the woods to hide the treasure. The 500-footers were people walking along the creek.
                    I need to give this some more thought.
                    Last edited by Redneck Girl; 04-24-2021, 07:34 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I had a Slough Creek solve. There are several consecutive meadows. There’s also a ranch way up... Silver Tip. Check it out. They travel in and out by wagon.

                      Lots of grizzlies there. I’m headed up there mid-May and will check it all out, since I’ll have 2 other people with me this time! It is gorgeous. Yes, dirt road. Many, many people everywhere in the summer. But not so much in the meadows.

                      Slough is pretty much a synonym for WWWH. End, begin.

                      HoB could be Druid Peak. Wolf Pack there, legendary, alpha’s name was....

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                      • #12
                        Let's not talk about those Frog Legs....
                        How 'bout this instead?

                        Click image for larger version

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Redneck Girl View Post
                          Thanks for posting the video. Getting chased up a tree by a Bull Moose and then getting stuck in quicksand and having to walk four miles with only one shoe all sounds pretty traumatic for a young kid. It's probably something he'd remember.
                          I don't know what to think about Slough Creek. If that was the area then what was WWWH? Was WWWH somewhere along the Lamar River and then "your creek" was Slough Creek? Or was WWWH near the Montana Border and "canyon down" was Slough Creek? I thought we decided that "warm" referred to the temperature of the water. I'll have to spend more time thinking about this.
                          I believe Slough Creek is correct...you need to greatly increase the distance the poem covered....Remember what Forrest said...Drink more Ovaltine.
                          We shall not cease......until we arrive at the beginning and know it for the first time.....
                          Those two passages give you the overall path that you must follow to solve the poem.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by anonymoussearcher View Post
                            Read flywater and watch this video
                            What's your point?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Redneck Girl View Post

                              That makes sense.
                              If the Lamar Valley Ranger Station was hoB, then "put-in below the hoB" would have been the turn-off up Slough Creek. No place for the meek means you're driving a dirt road (I think it's dirt but I'm not sure) and "the end" would be the campground at the end of the road. Since you know that you have to be "in the wood", that hints at the forested area upriver from the campground. No paddle up your creek means you have to go up it on foot. "Heavy loads and water high" could refer to McBride Lake (thanks to DanNun for pointing this out on a different thread) or the marshy area (slough means marsh) along the creek.
                              If this is the right area then Forrest probably parked at the campground and walked about 0.5-1.0 miles up the creek before going into the woods to hide the treasure. The 500-footers were people walking along the creek.
                              I need to give this some more thought.
                              That seems like quite a slog, especially carrying the heavy goodies. What would make this such a special place to Fenn?

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