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email question I sent to Jack today (April 12)

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  • Macahol
    replied
    Originally posted by Lady V View Post

    He implies there is a right sequence of clues. This reminds me of ff having written that no one had yet given him the clue solutions "in the right order." How could one mix up the order of clues? Aren't they contiguous and continuous? Do two of them refer to places that could be mixed up with one another? I'm still scratching my head about that one.
    What I believe is the HoB, some people seemed to think might be the blaze. In theory we each could have had most of the poem solved but with a key clue flip-flopped. Granted, in that case only 8 of our clue solutions likely would have matched.

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  • Old Pilot
    replied
    Originally posted by Sunburnt1 View Post
    Just a hope..
    Forrest had no problem with his secret, his spot and why it was so special to him to be known by the world.
    I hope to God everything going forward is not controlled by Jack..
    He's doing a injustice to Forrests legacy by trying to be coy in my opinion.
    So I'm hoping it's just a ploy, buying time until everything is set into place for a grand finale.
    How will "a grand finale" be recognized as such?

    Leave a comment:


  • Old Pilot
    replied
    Originally posted by June Did Everything Right View Post

    No, Thanos, it's not overthinking things. As a former English Major and someone who taught English at the college level for years... that's our goal as writers and majors: to master the language and focus with lasers on our word choices and verb tenses to drive clarity and perfection. The fact that this came out in a written publication, rather than in speech, where English majors are more relaxed, means something.

    Expecting someone with a four year college degree from one of our nation's top tier colleges to not screw up is not ridiculous. And that error glares right off the page. It's literally the expectation everyone would and should have for an English major.

    That wasn't a simple post on a blog like this. That was Jack introducing himself to the world of searchers after Forrest had passed away. It's part eulogy and part memoir; it's high powered writing and a piece he certainly worked on for days if not weeks to get just right. One would expect extreme precision and revision in such a piece, until it was perfect. I mean, he even wrote a poem in that piece. If an English major didn't understand lay/lie verb tenses, they certainly would have had that beaten into them first semester of Freshmen year. No English major would have problems with that post-graduation.

    Had he said it in speaking or on video, free pass to him, but he did that in a written piece, which for an English major is every bit as important as a finished painting is to an artist. If you were an English major, you'd understand the hundreds of papers and articles we generate during college and the constant revision and editing and red lines we see through our work and comments on getting it correct.

    All of this to say, Jack knows what he's doing with the language. He's not a high school grad who simply wasn't bright with words. He's a college graduate who majored in English at Georgetown. By the time Jack graduated from college, he probably had spent hundreds of hours editing for a college publication or proof-reading his peers' writing looking for just such errors as verb tense and etc. And beyond that, Jack wrote for the Onion. Do you know how hard that is to do? It's like a top one percent of writers who attempt it will ever get published there. How important to a writer is publishing in the Onion and what does that mean for their career? Good question. Have you heard of Saturday Night Live? Because they hire Onion writers all the time.

    Despite his error in judgment as a writer targeting a child for a joke in poor taste, Jack is an adept writer. The degree Jack earned from Georgetown has a pricetag of over $200,000 dollars for four years. But I recall he double majored, so it might have been closer to $300,000. You don't screw up lay/lie verbs with that degree. And beyond that every decent writer has their writer friends proofread or edit their work before sending it out just to have fresh eyes on it. Every. Single. Writer. Does. This.
    Subtle, but good one (Onion).

    Leave a comment:


  • Sunburnt1
    replied
    Just a hope..
    Forrest had no problem with his secret, his spot and why it was so special to him to be known by the world.
    I hope to God everything going forward is not controlled by Jack..
    He's doing a injustice to Forrests legacy by trying to be coy in my opinion.
    So I'm hoping it's just a ploy, buying time until everything is set into place for a grand finale.

    Leave a comment:


  • Old Pilot
    replied
    Originally posted by Sunburnt1 View Post
    "Where the treasure lied"
    -Where the Treasurer lied- John Connally US Treasury Secretary
    "figuring out the problem "
    The message hidden in the poem.
    John Connally - double letter's in names ff was found of using.
    John Connally knew the truth about how Lyndon Johnson was linked to the Kennedy assination.
    Ff has proof on this.
    Jack has now mentioned him twice know. There is relevance.
    The truth will come out.
    Jack is playing with us. There is something BIG in the works that will all come out on a set date.
    in my opinion.
    Please tell us more about "a set date".

    Leave a comment:


  • Old Pilot
    replied
    Originally posted by Zapster View Post

    I find it amusing that a self-proclaimed English major would make the error "where the treasure LIED." It should have been either where the treasure lay, or where the treasure had lain, depending on the verb tense he wanted to use.

    Jack would probably claim he was channeling Forrest and trying to be ironic (e.g. imagination is more important than knowlege).
    This one was scuba . . . subtle, clever, understood, but appreciated.

    Leave a comment:


  • ThanosSnappedtheChest
    replied
    Originally posted by June Did Everything Right View Post

    No, Thanos, it's not overthinking things. As a former English Major and someone who taught English at the college level for years... that's our goal as writers and majors: to master the language and focus with lasers on our word choices and verb tenses to drive clarity and perfection. The fact that this came out in a written publication, rather than in speech, where English majors are more relaxed, means something.

    Expecting someone with a four year college degree from one of our nation's top tier colleges to not screw up is not ridiculous. And that error glares right off the page. It's literally the expectation everyone would and should have for an English major.

    That wasn't a simple post on a blog like this. That was Jack introducing himself to the world of searchers after Forrest had passed away. It's part eulogy and part memoir; it's high powered writing and a piece he certainly worked on for days if not weeks to get just right. One would expect extreme precision and revision in such a piece, until it was perfect. I mean, he even wrote a poem in that piece. If an English major didn't understand lay/lie verb tenses, they certainly would have had that beaten into them first semester of Freshmen year. No English major would have problems with that post-graduation.

    Had he said it in speaking or on video, free pass to him, but he did that in a written piece, which for an English major is every bit as important as a finished painting is to an artist. If you were an English major, you'd understand the hundreds of papers and articles we generate during college and the constant revision and editing and red lines we see through our work and comments on getting it correct.

    All of this to say, Jack knows what he's doing with the language. He's not a high school grad who simply wasn't bright with words. He's a college graduate who majored in English at Georgetown. By the time Jack graduated from college, he probably had spent hundreds of hours editing for a college publication or proof-reading his peers' writing looking for just such errors as verb tense and etc. And beyond that, Jack wrote for the Onion. Do you know how hard that is to do? It's like a top one percent of writers who attempt it will ever get published there. How important to a writer is publishing in the Onion and what does that mean for their career? Good question. Have you heard of Saturday Night Live? Because they hire Onion writers all the time.

    Despite his error in judgment as a writer targeting a child for a joke in poor taste, Jack is an adept writer. The degree Jack earned from Georgetown has a pricetag of over $200,000 dollars for four years. But I recall he double majored, so it might have been closer to $300,000. You don't screw up lay/lie verbs with that degree. And beyond that every decent writer has their writer friends proofread or edit their work before sending it out just to have fresh eyes on it. Every. Single. Writer. Does. This.
    While I understand what you're saying, I choose to stand by my original point. As someone who teaches English part-time, I take no issue with Jack's responses. Expecting someone someone with a four year college degree to not screw up is ridiculous. While you may have expectations for others, others are not required to live up to such things. Where Jack studied, as well as what papers he's written don't really concern me. The Onion isn't something I'd consider a highlight in one's career. In regards to Saturday Night Live, I've heard of it. Saturday Night Live is that overhyped show that the generations that preceded me seem to think is the de-facto standard for good television.

    Jack is an adept writer. However, I don't care about the school where he attended. It also seems that I'm the only one in this conversation who hasn't access the information from the bursar's office at Georgetown in order to obtain his bill for each semester. If you don't screw up verbs, that's fine. You're free to live up to the standard which you've set for yourself. However, nobody is required to live up to your standards.

    Jack found the treasure and is moving on with his life. While that occurs, the bottom line that I'm seeing here thus far is the same. Before my first post here, I took the time to click through a few threads. Within five minutes, without even trying, I saw a picture of his apartment in Philadelphia, as well as a photo of a market very familiar to me. I not know the college he went to, the fact that he double majored, among many other facts that nobody in this forum should know about another person. I'm actually going to posit the question: is there a line that searchers on this forum will draw?
    Last edited by ThanosSnappedtheChest; 04-15-2021, 12:48 AM.

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  • Lady V
    replied
    I, too, majored in English for a time. Dear God. I get extremely uncomfortable when I make a grammatical error.

    I agree, Jack is likely using words in a particular way.

    "Eventually, one night I felt like I had a beat on the right sequence of clues leading to a specific sort of spot, and within a couple hours, I had pieced together the evidence."

    He implies there is a right sequence of clues. This reminds me of ff having written that no one had yet given him the clue solutions "in the right order." How could one mix up the order of clues? Aren't they contiguous and continuous? Do two of them refer to places that could be mixed up with one another? I'm still scratching my head about that one.

    Leave a comment:


  • Zapster
    replied
    Originally posted by WhiteOak141 View Post

    All that is say, I don’t think we should hold Jack’s feet to the fire for mixing up lay/lie simply because he studied English.
    It wasn't my intention to make a federal case out of Jack's lay/lie faux pas -- as I posted originally, I simply found it amusing, ironic and potentially even intentional, given the topic he was addressing:

    "That to me is what I did: I approached researching this hunt with an open mind and with an eye for detail, and I did it exhaustively. I was rewarded with not only a deeper appreciation of Forrest and his methods, but was also surprised to find two subtle slip-ups Forrest made that ended up having a major impact on my ideas about where the treasure lied."




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  • 1&Only1Trailblazer
    replied
    I don’t even know what a verb tense is, except it could be a tense verb? I like a calm verb myself...

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  • June Did Everything Right
    replied
    Originally posted by WhiteOak141 View Post

    If that were true, your sentence would be “Every decent searcher have their own approach to solving this treasure hunt,” to reflect the plural—one “has,” but many “have.” But that’s awful sounding and obviously incorrect. No one says “every flower have pedals” or “every bird have wings” or “every rock are heavy”—we say “every flower has pedals” and “every bird has wings” “every rock is heavy”—singular. “Every” means “each,” and even if something applies to all members of a class, it’s still singular in use (“each car has 4 wheels,” not “each car have four wheels”)

    You should let RahRah do your bidding—her post about general use of “their” as a stand-in for the singular in gender-neutral situations was fairly convincing. Yours....not so much.

    All that is say, I don’t think we should hold Jack’s feet to the fire for mixing up lay/lie simply because he studied English.
    If we do this for four more years eight hours every day, you could earn a BA in English too. What you're not grasping is context. It's plural in context (every) but because the noun (searcher) isn't pluralized one uses the singular verb for clarity. Just as I did. It's a bit of the finer tuning in using the language. Once you've studied prescriptive and descriptive grammars it will make more sense.

    Leave a comment:


  • WhiteOak141
    replied
    Originally posted by June Did Everything Right View Post

    I guess you missed that writer has been pluralized by the use of the word "every." Every decent writer has. It's that sort of nuance that an English major grasps. Writer itself is a singular noun (congratulations) but every creates a larger plural referent. See if you catch it this time around: Every decent searcher has their own approach to solving this treasure hunt. That tricky little every, just making shit plural in front of our eyes for centuries. I can see calling hyperbole on the use of the word every, since probably not all writers do this, but the good ones do.
    If that were true, your sentence would be “Every decent searcher have their own approach to solving this treasure hunt,” to reflect the plural—one “has,” but many “have.” But that’s awful sounding and obviously incorrect. No one says “every flower have pedals” or “every bird have wings” or “every rock are heavy”—we say “every flower has pedals” and “every bird has wings” “every rock is heavy”—singular. “Every” means “each,” and even if something applies to all members of a class, it’s still singular in use (“each car has 4 wheels,” not “each car have four wheels”)

    You should let RahRah do your bidding—her post about general use of “their” as a stand-in for the singular in gender-neutral situations was fairly convincing. Yours....not so much.

    All that is say, I don’t think we should hold Jack’s feet to the fire for mixing up lay/lie simply because he studied English.

    Leave a comment:


  • June Did Everything Right
    replied
    Originally posted by WhiteOak141 View Post

    “And beyond that every decent writer”—SINGULAR subject—“has their”—PLURAL pronoun—“writer friends proofread or edit their”—another PLURAL pronoun—“work before sending it out just to have fresh eyes on it.”

    The “their” should be “his or her”. Sure doesn’t sound like you studied college English, let alone taught it.
    I guess you missed that writer has been pluralized by the use of the word "every." Every decent writer has. It's that sort of nuance that an English major grasps. Writer itself is a singular noun (congratulations) but every creates a larger plural referent. See if you catch it this time around: Every decent searcher has their own approach to solving this treasure hunt. That tricky little every, just making shit plural in front of our eyes for centuries. I can see calling hyperbole on the use of the word every, since probably not all writers do this, but the good ones do.

    Also, I made an exception between a piece of published writing and a blog post. I'm writing blog posts here and as such I'm clearly not rewriting them or editing them extensively, let alone having an editor proofread them for me.

    The assertion that I would lie about my undergrad degree or teaching falls flat because I know my education and my work history. Who would lie about that and why? There'd be no point.

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  • Redneck Girl
    replied
    I knew it. Almost everyone who posts on this blog was an English major. No wonder I feel like such an idiot whenever I try to write something.

    Leave a comment:


  • RahRah
    replied
    Originally posted by WhiteOak141 View Post

    “And beyond that every decent writer”—SINGULAR subject—“has their”—PLURAL pronoun—“writer friends proofread or edit their”—another PLURAL pronoun—“work before sending it out just to have fresh eyes on it.”

    The “their” should be “his or her”. Sure doesn’t sound like you studied college English, let alone taught it.
    THEIR: his or her : his, her —used with a singular antecedent that is indefinite or that does not specify gender; the use of they, their, them, and themselves as pronouns of indefinite gender and indefinite number is well established in speech and writing, even in literary and formal contexts. This gives you the option of using the plural pronouns where you think they sound best, and of using the singular pronouns (such as he, she, he or she, and their inflected forms) where you think they sound best. English lacks a common-gender third person singular pronoun that can be used to refer to indefinite pronouns like everyone, anyone, and someone. Writers and speakers have long supplied this lack by using the plural pronouns.

    Leave a comment:

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