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email question I sent to Jack today (April 12)

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  • #46
    I, too, majored in English for a time. Dear God. I get extremely uncomfortable when I make a grammatical error.

    I agree, Jack is likely using words in a particular way.

    "Eventually, one night I felt like I had a beat on the right sequence of clues leading to a specific sort of spot, and within a couple hours, I had pieced together the evidence."

    He implies there is a right sequence of clues. This reminds me of ff having written that no one had yet given him the clue solutions "in the right order." How could one mix up the order of clues? Aren't they contiguous and continuous? Do two of them refer to places that could be mixed up with one another? I'm still scratching my head about that one.

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    • #47
      Originally posted by June Did Everything Right View Post

      No, Thanos, it's not overthinking things. As a former English Major and someone who taught English at the college level for years... that's our goal as writers and majors: to master the language and focus with lasers on our word choices and verb tenses to drive clarity and perfection. The fact that this came out in a written publication, rather than in speech, where English majors are more relaxed, means something.

      Expecting someone with a four year college degree from one of our nation's top tier colleges to not screw up is not ridiculous. And that error glares right off the page. It's literally the expectation everyone would and should have for an English major.

      That wasn't a simple post on a blog like this. That was Jack introducing himself to the world of searchers after Forrest had passed away. It's part eulogy and part memoir; it's high powered writing and a piece he certainly worked on for days if not weeks to get just right. One would expect extreme precision and revision in such a piece, until it was perfect. I mean, he even wrote a poem in that piece. If an English major didn't understand lay/lie verb tenses, they certainly would have had that beaten into them first semester of Freshmen year. No English major would have problems with that post-graduation.

      Had he said it in speaking or on video, free pass to him, but he did that in a written piece, which for an English major is every bit as important as a finished painting is to an artist. If you were an English major, you'd understand the hundreds of papers and articles we generate during college and the constant revision and editing and red lines we see through our work and comments on getting it correct.

      All of this to say, Jack knows what he's doing with the language. He's not a high school grad who simply wasn't bright with words. He's a college graduate who majored in English at Georgetown. By the time Jack graduated from college, he probably had spent hundreds of hours editing for a college publication or proof-reading his peers' writing looking for just such errors as verb tense and etc. And beyond that, Jack wrote for the Onion. Do you know how hard that is to do? It's like a top one percent of writers who attempt it will ever get published there. How important to a writer is publishing in the Onion and what does that mean for their career? Good question. Have you heard of Saturday Night Live? Because they hire Onion writers all the time.

      Despite his error in judgment as a writer targeting a child for a joke in poor taste, Jack is an adept writer. The degree Jack earned from Georgetown has a pricetag of over $200,000 dollars for four years. But I recall he double majored, so it might have been closer to $300,000. You don't screw up lay/lie verbs with that degree. And beyond that every decent writer has their writer friends proofread or edit their work before sending it out just to have fresh eyes on it. Every. Single. Writer. Does. This.
      While I understand what you're saying, I choose to stand by my original point. As someone who teaches English part-time, I take no issue with Jack's responses. Expecting someone someone with a four year college degree to not screw up is ridiculous. While you may have expectations for others, others are not required to live up to such things. Where Jack studied, as well as what papers he's written don't really concern me. The Onion isn't something I'd consider a highlight in one's career. In regards to Saturday Night Live, I've heard of it. Saturday Night Live is that overhyped show that the generations that preceded me seem to think is the de-facto standard for good television.

      Jack is an adept writer. However, I don't care about the school where he attended. It also seems that I'm the only one in this conversation who hasn't access the information from the bursar's office at Georgetown in order to obtain his bill for each semester. If you don't screw up verbs, that's fine. You're free to live up to the standard which you've set for yourself. However, nobody is required to live up to your standards.

      Jack found the treasure and is moving on with his life. While that occurs, the bottom line that I'm seeing here thus far is the same. Before my first post here, I took the time to click through a few threads. Within five minutes, without even trying, I saw a picture of his apartment in Philadelphia, as well as a photo of a market very familiar to me. I not know the college he went to, the fact that he double majored, among many other facts that nobody in this forum should know about another person. I'm actually going to posit the question: is there a line that searchers on this forum will draw?
      Last edited by ThanosSnappedtheChest; 04-15-2021, 12:48 AM.

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      • #48
        Originally posted by Zapster View Post

        I find it amusing that a self-proclaimed English major would make the error "where the treasure LIED." It should have been either where the treasure lay, or where the treasure had lain, depending on the verb tense he wanted to use.

        Jack would probably claim he was channeling Forrest and trying to be ironic (e.g. imagination is more important than knowlege).
        This one was scuba . . . subtle, clever, understood, but appreciated.

        Comment


        • #49
          Originally posted by Sunburnt1 View Post
          "Where the treasure lied"
          -Where the Treasurer lied- John Connally US Treasury Secretary
          "figuring out the problem "
          The message hidden in the poem.
          John Connally - double letter's in names ff was found of using.
          John Connally knew the truth about how Lyndon Johnson was linked to the Kennedy assination.
          Ff has proof on this.
          Jack has now mentioned him twice know. There is relevance.
          The truth will come out.
          Jack is playing with us. There is something BIG in the works that will all come out on a set date.
          in my opinion.
          Please tell us more about "a set date".

          Comment


          • #50
            Just a hope..
            Forrest had no problem with his secret, his spot and why it was so special to him to be known by the world.
            I hope to God everything going forward is not controlled by Jack..
            He's doing a injustice to Forrests legacy by trying to be coy in my opinion.
            So I'm hoping it's just a ploy, buying time until everything is set into place for a grand finale.

            Comment


            • #51
              Originally posted by June Did Everything Right View Post

              No, Thanos, it's not overthinking things. As a former English Major and someone who taught English at the college level for years... that's our goal as writers and majors: to master the language and focus with lasers on our word choices and verb tenses to drive clarity and perfection. The fact that this came out in a written publication, rather than in speech, where English majors are more relaxed, means something.

              Expecting someone with a four year college degree from one of our nation's top tier colleges to not screw up is not ridiculous. And that error glares right off the page. It's literally the expectation everyone would and should have for an English major.

              That wasn't a simple post on a blog like this. That was Jack introducing himself to the world of searchers after Forrest had passed away. It's part eulogy and part memoir; it's high powered writing and a piece he certainly worked on for days if not weeks to get just right. One would expect extreme precision and revision in such a piece, until it was perfect. I mean, he even wrote a poem in that piece. If an English major didn't understand lay/lie verb tenses, they certainly would have had that beaten into them first semester of Freshmen year. No English major would have problems with that post-graduation.

              Had he said it in speaking or on video, free pass to him, but he did that in a written piece, which for an English major is every bit as important as a finished painting is to an artist. If you were an English major, you'd understand the hundreds of papers and articles we generate during college and the constant revision and editing and red lines we see through our work and comments on getting it correct.

              All of this to say, Jack knows what he's doing with the language. He's not a high school grad who simply wasn't bright with words. He's a college graduate who majored in English at Georgetown. By the time Jack graduated from college, he probably had spent hundreds of hours editing for a college publication or proof-reading his peers' writing looking for just such errors as verb tense and etc. And beyond that, Jack wrote for the Onion. Do you know how hard that is to do? It's like a top one percent of writers who attempt it will ever get published there. How important to a writer is publishing in the Onion and what does that mean for their career? Good question. Have you heard of Saturday Night Live? Because they hire Onion writers all the time.

              Despite his error in judgment as a writer targeting a child for a joke in poor taste, Jack is an adept writer. The degree Jack earned from Georgetown has a pricetag of over $200,000 dollars for four years. But I recall he double majored, so it might have been closer to $300,000. You don't screw up lay/lie verbs with that degree. And beyond that every decent writer has their writer friends proofread or edit their work before sending it out just to have fresh eyes on it. Every. Single. Writer. Does. This.
              Subtle, but good one (Onion).

              Comment


              • #52
                Originally posted by Sunburnt1 View Post
                Just a hope..
                Forrest had no problem with his secret, his spot and why it was so special to him to be known by the world.
                I hope to God everything going forward is not controlled by Jack..
                He's doing a injustice to Forrests legacy by trying to be coy in my opinion.
                So I'm hoping it's just a ploy, buying time until everything is set into place for a grand finale.
                How will "a grand finale" be recognized as such?

                Comment


                • #53
                  Originally posted by Lady V View Post

                  He implies there is a right sequence of clues. This reminds me of ff having written that no one had yet given him the clue solutions "in the right order." How could one mix up the order of clues? Aren't they contiguous and continuous? Do two of them refer to places that could be mixed up with one another? I'm still scratching my head about that one.
                  What I believe is the HoB, some people seemed to think might be the blaze. In theory we each could have had most of the poem solved but with a key clue flip-flopped. Granted, in that case only 8 of our clue solutions likely would have matched.

                  Comment

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