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email question I sent to Jack today (April 12)

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  • #16
    Redneck Girl - Buffalo Horn Creek is the home of Brown.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by OH!! View Post

      That is easy. I just commented on what he wrote:
      I looked in a couple of other places in 2018, but they were more recon missions to see if ideas I had were possible matches to the poem, and they weren't. Those were the result of forcing myself to come up with new ideas
      I suggest you learn how to avoid making so many assumptions as that is no way at all to do anything analytical.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Blazingwaddles View Post

        I suggest you learn how to avoid making so many assumptions as that is no way at all to do anything analytical.
        I think he is doing just fine.
        “Positivity triumphs over negativity” - famous quote by the famous Cowlazars 2018

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        • #19
          Six Questions with Jack:

          1Q) Thank you so much Jack for participating in the final Six Questions on Forrest Fenn’s The Thrill of the Chase. I hope they will help bring closure to how each of us took up our own hunt for the treasure; that they will encourage us to apply the wisdom gained from the experience Forrest gave us; and to peacefully move on to ever greater Chases within our lives. The Forrest Fenn Treasure was found, but the Chase of life is never-ending. Much awaits.

          You have explained some of how you worked the solution. How you discerned the general location for where Forrest would have wanted to die. Can you share more of how you worked through that process and further pursued the poem? Was it one ‘aha’ moment that rapidly connected everything, or was each piece and clue a struggle to connect and follow? What caused you to be so confident of the one spot, never wavering from it, even after numerous days of failure? Was there a day you almost gave up?

          There is a great investor named Charlie Munger who helms Berkshire Hathaway with Warren Buffett. Munger is turning 97 in a few weeks, and he’s the most rational person I’ve ever seen, only sharpening with age. He has a lecture called “The Psychology of Human Misjudgment” that inspired my own YouTube video on the treasure hunt back in 2019. I think if I ever wrote a book on the chase, it would be at least as interesting to explore how people didn’t figure it out as how I did. Anyway, I heard Munger once say that, “a problem fully understood is half solved.” And I think that kind of approach was key.

          I wanted to exhaustively read, watch, and listen to every single article about the chase wherein Forrest was quoted and every interview he ever gave on the subject to understand, as well as I could, the nature of the problem at hand. I tracked down all those primary sources and went over them multiple times, which is many hours of work, but each time I went through them, I understood Forrest and what he was trying to do with the poem better, each time making connections between different things he said in different places.

          I’m also a fan of Robert Caro, who has been at work on a series of Pulitzer Prize-winning Lyndon Johnson biographies for more than 40 years. (A prominent source in his books is Forrest’s friend and former business partner John Connally, so it was fun for me to get a chance to talk with Forrest about him.) Caro is 85 and is just now getting to the bulk of Johnson’s presidency. He’s the greatest researcher I’ve ever seen, and he’s written a great book on the subject called Working, in which he details the most important advice on research he got from an early editor: “Turn every page. Never assume anything. Turn every goddamn page.” That to me is what I did: I approached researching this hunt with an open mind and with an eye for detail, and I did it exhaustively. I was rewarded with not only a deeper appreciation of Forrest and his methods, but was also surprised to find two subtle slip-ups Forrest made that ended up having a major impact on my ideas about where the treasure lied.

          After fully understanding the nature of the problem, I had to actually solve it, of course. That meant reading The Thrill of the Chase and its poem but also every personal story Forrest wrote of his life. When he published that book, he had no idea his stories would find such a receptive audience, and he became an almost compulsive memoirist, sharing a huge volume of stories of his life throughout the decade. The poem is like many of those stories in that it reflects his point of view and his emotions on a journey that was important to him, so to me, it was important to see it not as a separate work of writing defined by its unique purpose, but rather within that broader context.

          So yes, I was thinking about clues and looking and maps and trying to piece everything together in that phase, but I also tried to incorporate everything I knew about the nature of the hunt and everything I knew about how he thought and what was important to him. And when I started to feel like I had certain concepts down, and I felt like I knew what region the treasure was in and what sort of “solve” we needed, I did incorporate some other information from other sources that have nothing to do with Forrest Fenn that I felt could help inform me.

          Eventually, one night I felt like I had a beat on the right sequence of clues leading to a specific sort of spot, and within a couple hours, I had pieced together the evidence. Suddenly, when I found one certain bit of evidence, I did have that “aha moment” and quickly booked an early morning flight out West. I was not certain at that point, but I thought I had enough evidence it was likely there to go out and look for it.

          When I went boots on the ground, my conception of the path in the poem I had put together from home was matched by the physical features I went to, but I did some additional reconnaissance on some other areas I thought could hold potential for matching parts of the poem because I didn’t want to get locked into one idea and lose any objectivity I had. But that first place I went to was the correct location.

          Obviously, I didn’t find it on my few trips in 2018, so I had to face the prospect that the treasure probably wasn’t there. I tried my best to consider other spots, but late in 2018 I had another “aha moment” and encountered enough new circumstantial evidence that I felt the total body of evidence I had collected to that point definitively proved that was where Forrest wanted to die, as daunting as it was to keep looking in a spot that had been a loser for me.

          Forrest once said he thought the treasure may be found by the person who could best adjust, and it was certainly true that I had to adjust my approach along the way. I think I figured out where it was by being relentlessly goal-oriented, remembering that the poem itself is not the point, but rather the special place where he wished he could have died. But I think the next phase, boots on the ground, rewarded a process-oriented approach, putting in the methodical work out in the woods required to find the blaze. The research phase probably played more to my strengths, so I had to work harder at creating a good boots-on-the-ground approach to actually find the thing, and I was thrown for an additional curveball when I realized the blaze had probably been damaged by natural forces.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by kpro View Post

            I think he is doing just fine.
            Analytics are useful but you have to go about it in an objective way otherwise you will always find what you are looking for. He could and should do better.

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            • #21
              “two subtle slip-ups Forrest made that ended up having a major impact on my ideas about where the treasure lied.”

              Two subtle slip-ups... two trips to hide the treasure
              That’s ironic. Why does it sound like he’s talking in circles?

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              • #22
                Originally posted by SangreDeCristo View Post
                “two subtle slip-ups Forrest made that ended up having a major impact on my ideas about where the treasure lied.”

                Two subtle slip-ups... two trips to hide the treasure
                That’s ironic. Why does it sound like he’s talking in circles?
                I find it amusing that a self-proclaimed English major would make the error "where the treasure LIED." It should have been either where the treasure lay, or where the treasure had lain, depending on the verb tense he wanted to use.

                Jack would probably claim he was channeling Forrest and trying to be ironic (e.g. imagination is more important than knowlege).
                Last edited by Zapster; 04-13-2021, 06:08 PM.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Blazingwaddles View Post

                  Analytics are useful but you have to go about it in an objective way otherwise you will always find what you are looking for. He could and should do better.
                  Nah, you get what you pay for.
                  “Positivity triumphs over negativity” - famous quote by the famous Cowlazars 2018

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Zapster View Post

                    I find it amusing that a self-proclaimed English major would make the error "where the treasure LIED." It should have been either where the treasure lay, or where the treasure had lain, depending on the verb tense he wanted to use.

                    Jack would probably claim he was channeling Forrest and trying to be ironic (e.g. imagination is more important than knowlege).
                    Yep. You are correct.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by kpro View Post

                      Nah, you get what you pay for.
                      Good point!

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Zapster View Post

                        I find it amusing that a self-proclaimed English major would make the error "where the treasure LIED." It should have been either where the treasure lay, or where the treasure had lain, depending on the verb tense he wanted to use.
                        Same. Then I wondered if his use of “lied” in that context was a hint because it seems extraordinarily misplaced imo; he is a great writer, and great writer’s generally don’t (cannot) let those type of errors loose.
                        His choice of verbiage regarding where F “wanted to die” is equally odd.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Zapster View Post

                          I find it amusing that a self-proclaimed English major would make the error "where the treasure LIED." It should have been either where the treasure lay, or where the treasure had lain, depending on the verb tense he wanted to use.

                          Jack would probably claim he was channeling Forrest and trying to be ironic (e.g. imagination is more important than knowlege).
                          "Where the treasure lay" can actually become the terminology here on out- it has allure, and combines nicely with an era, a time that this treasure was actually somewhere waiting. Even in the past-tense, it's still there, now, tomorrow, in our minds - as it should be. Where it lay can mean where it had lain. Economy. Not that I'm a great writer. Have released some.

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                          • #28
                            "Where the treasure lied"
                            -Where the Treasurer lied- John Connally US Treasury Secretary
                            "figuring out the problem "
                            The message hidden in the poem.
                            John Connally - double letter's in names ff was found of using.
                            John Connally knew the truth about how Lyndon Johnson was linked to the Kennedy assination.
                            Ff has proof on this.
                            Jack has now mentioned him twice know. There is relevance.
                            The truth will come out.
                            Jack is playing with us. There is something BIG in the works that will all come out on a set date.
                            in my opinion.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Sunburnt1 View Post
                              "Where the treasure lied"
                              -Where the Treasurer lied- John Connally US Treasury Secretary
                              "figuring out the problem "
                              The message hidden in the poem.
                              John Connally - double letter's in names ff was found of using.
                              John Connally knew the truth about how Lyndon Johnson was linked to the Kennedy assination.
                              Ff has proof on this.
                              Jack has now mentioned him twice know. There is relevance.
                              The truth will come out.
                              Jack is playing with us. There is something BIG in the works that will all come out on a set date.
                              in my opinion.
                              FF only had proof of who killed Arthur Rochford Manby. Apparently he took that with him to the grave.

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                              • #30
                                Don't make the alligator mad until you've crossed the creek.
                                Now that Forrest has passed. His "secret" can be revealed.

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