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email questions I sent to Jack on April 10

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  • email questions I sent to Jack on April 10

    I’ve always wondered about this quote from Forrest:
    “There are many places in the Rocky Mountains where warm waters halt, and nearly all of them are north of Santa Fe. Look at the big picture, there are no short cuts. f”

    When Forrest said there are many places in the Rocky Mountains WWWH, did he mean places that are the same (or similar) to the WWWH in the correct solve? I ask because some people think this means there are many ideas people might come up with for places in the Rocky Mountains WWWH.
    I think he was saying there are lots of places where that phrase could be used, not places that are clones of the place in the poem

    If you answered yes to the previous question then does “and nearly all of them are north of Santa Fe” mean “and nearly all of the many places in the Rocky Mountains WWWH are north of Santa Fe”? I ask because some people think this just means that nearly all of the Rocky Mountains are north of Santa Fe.
    Yes, because most of the Rockies are north of there

    Does “Look at the big picture” mean you need to make an educated guess at WWWH and see if you can then get the other clues (canyon down, TFTW, etc.) to make sense?
    No

    Would you prefer that I not post your answers on THOR?
    Everyone can post my responses online. No need to ask


  • #2
    Hi Redneck Girl. Are you saying you sent this to Jack today and he already responded?

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by nomadicMadman View Post
      Hi Redneck Girl. Are you saying you sent this to Jack today and he already responded?
      Yes. I sent it at 10:13 am and he replied at 4:39 pm.

      Comment


      • #4
        He must not be getting to many e mails, I would imagine he is being forgotten, pretty sure Forrest wanted himself to be remembered, not Jack. It’s lonely on the top, or so I’ve heard....

        Comment


        • #5
          "I think he was saying there are lots of places where that phrase could be used, not places that are clones of the place in the poem"

          WWWH: 'Yellowstone'

          There are many places and features called 'Yellowstone', most of which are in the Rockies north of Santa Fe.

          Only two of them are suitable to 'Begin it' at, and neither of them are at the NP.

          Only one of those two is within Wyoming (in Cody).

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Redneck Girl View Post
            I’ve always wondered about this quote from Forrest:
            [FONT=Cambria][COLOR=#000000][COLOR=#666666]
            When Forrest said there are many places in the Rocky Mountains WWWH, did he mean places that are the same (or similar) to the WWWH in the correct solve? I ask because some people think this means there are many ideas people might come up with for places in the Rocky Mountains WWWH.
            I think he was saying there are lots of places where that phrase could be used, not places that are clones of the place in the poem


            I believe Jack answered this question truthfully and helpfully.

            Comment


            • #7
              “Cloned”...hahaha

              clone-a person or thing regarded as identical to another.

              Thanks Jack, and Redneck Girl! This only helps my conviction.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by DanNun View Post
                “Cloned”...hahaha

                clone-a person or thing regarded as identical to another.

                Thanks Jack, and Redneck Girl! This only helps my conviction.
                Seriously, right? He thinks he's so clever!
                To be right for someone, you have to be willing to be wrong for someone else.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I would have answered the same way as non-solver Jack.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Redneck Girl View Post
                    I’ve always wondered about this quote from Forrest:
                    “There are many places in the Rocky Mountains where warm waters halt, and nearly all of them are north of Santa Fe. Look at the big picture, there are no short cuts. f”

                    When Forrest said there are many places in the Rocky Mountains WWWH, did he mean places that are the same (or similar) to the WWWH in the correct solve? I ask because some people think this means there are many ideas people might come up with for places in the Rocky Mountains WWWH.
                    I think he was saying there are lots of places where that phrase could be used, not places that are clones of the place in the poem

                    If you answered yes to the previous question then does “and nearly all of them are north of Santa Fe” mean “and nearly all of the many places in the Rocky Mountains WWWH are north of Santa Fe”? I ask because some people think this just means that nearly all of the Rocky Mountains are north of Santa Fe.
                    Yes, because most of the Rockies are north of there

                    Does “Look at the big picture” mean you need to make an educated guess at WWWH and see if you can then get the other clues (canyon down, TFTW, etc.) to make sense?
                    No

                    Would you prefer that I not post your answers on THOR?
                    Everyone can post my responses online. No need to ask
                    Thanks for asking some more good questions. The answers don't give much away, but they're still interesting. I thought that quote about WWWH might have referred to hot springs, but Jack didn't seem to think so. Also interesting that starting with a WWWH idea is not the best plan. Glad he's ok with answers being posted, I always got the impression he was fine with them being shared.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Jack’s answers to my first two questions seem vague and don’t appear to give much away, however I do think the word “clones” is interesting. One definition I found is “something that closely resembles another in appearance, function, performance, or style”. Geysers and hot springs are similar but I wouldn’t call them clones. The same goes for reservoirs and lakes.

                      My second question was an attempt to determine if there’s some place in the Rocky Mountains south of Santa Fe that’s similar to the WWWH in the poem. The Sangre de Cristos are the range of the Rockies that extend south of Santa Fe. They go as far south as I 25 near Glorieta, NM. Between Santa Fe and Glorieta there’s McClure Reservoir (near Santa Fe) and Montezuma Hot Springs (near Las Vegas NM). I’m not aware of any other potential candidates for WWWH in that area. For example the Continental Divide doesn’t go through the Sangre de Cristos.

                      Jack’s answer just says that nearly all of the places where the phrase WWWH could be used are north of Santa Fe because most of the Rockies are north of Santa Fe. This tells us absolutely nothing. However I asked Jack to answer my second question only if he had answered yes to my first question. I don’t know if that’s significant.

                      Jack’s answer to my third question says there was something that convinced him he had the correct WWWH, and it wasn’t just the fact that it seemed to fit with the other clues.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Redneck Girl View Post
                        Jack’s answers to my first two questions seem vague and don’t appear to give much away, however I do think the word “clones” is interesting. One definition I found is “something that closely resembles another in appearance, function, performance, or style”. Geysers and hot springs are similar but I wouldn’t call them clones. The same goes for reservoirs and lakes.
                        I'm of the opinion that the wording of the poem describes a road or other conduit whose name/designation is synonymous with WWWH. I know many believe that WWWH involves actual water, but I'm not sold on that despite what Jack has said or Fenn's cryptic toe remark. Therefore, I interpret Jack's answer to confirm that WWWH doesn't have to be a geyser/river/lake or other feature that might also be used in a solve. To me, his answer reinforces that WWWH can have a unique interpretation.
                        Last edited by Macahol; 04-11-2021, 12:18 PM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Macahol View Post

                          I'm of the opinion that the wording of the poem describes a road or other conduit whose name/designation is synonymous with WWWH. I know many believe that WWWH involves actual water, but I'm not sold on that despite what Jack has said or Fenn's cryptic toe remark. Therefore, I interpret Jack's answer to confirm that WWWH doesn't have to be a geyser/river/lake or other feature that might also be used in a solve. To me, his answer reinforces that WWWH can have a unique interpretation.
                          It does involve actual water. But many don’t want to see it from his perspective. Why did F say Dal’s water runs deep? It’s Forrest’s vernacular you need to try and understand. In the context of him sayin Dal’s water was deep was him saying Dal was dangerous. Aren’t we all water?

                          water-a colorless, transparent, odorless liquid that forms the seas, lakes, rivers, and rain and is the basis of the fluids of living organisms.

                          But I also believe Forrest used many definitions of the same word simultaneously...which makes it difficult to pin point. Water means water in the general sense of the definition. That’s how people arrived at the first spot not knowing it’s relation to the poem. And warm is relative...so the puzzle is finding what’s warm to Forrest.

                          When he said Did you dip your toe in it...he’s not saying because of its warmth. It’s an idiom and Forrest learned from his dad how to speak in metaphors and idioms.
                          Last edited by DanNun; 04-11-2021, 02:43 PM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by DanNun View Post

                            It does involve actual water. But many don’t want to see it from his perspective. Why did F say Dal’s water runs deep? It’s Forrest’s vernacular you need to try and understand. In the context of him sayin Dal’s water was deep was him saying Dal was dangerous. Aren’t we all water?

                            water-a colorless, transparent, odorless liquid that forms the seas, lakes, rivers, and rain and is the basis of the fluids of living organisms.

                            But I also believe Forrest used many definitions of the same word simultaneously...which makes it difficult to pin point. Water means water in the general sense of the definition. That’s how people arrived at the first spot not knowing it’s relation to the poem. And warm is relative...so the puzzle is finding what’s warm to Forrest.

                            When he said Did you dip your toe in it...he’s not saying because of its warmth. It’s an idiom and Forrest learned from his dad how to speak on metaphors and idioms.
                            Forrest said before"If you can figure out WWWH your already halfway there, metaphorically speaking"

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by rmx63 View Post

                              Forrest said before"If you can figure out WWWH your already halfway there, metaphorically speaking"
                              I wasn’t aware of the ‘metaphorically speaking’ portion of this quote and I find it intriguing all the more.

                              But again, it just goes to show things aren’t as literal as people want to believe. He said “Too far to walk” was a metaphor for his life. Why? It’s simple and he explains it in his epitaph... “I wish I could have lived to do, the things I was attributed to.”

                              At what point do we begin to live our lives? When we dip our toes in it? We start by getting out of our comfort zones and into experiencing new things. It’s about learning and living and a fulfillment of life. Wouldn’t it suck to get to the end and wish you had done more? Why else are there bucket lists? Speaking of that....do you know where that term originated? What about kick the bucket? Maybe one of the aberrations that live out on the edge is the story of Bessie and Me.

                              And why put clues in a poem in the first place? Well...because of this...

                              poem-a piece of writing that partakes of the nature of both speech and song that is nearly always rhythmical, usually metaphorical, and often exhibits such formal elements as meter, rhyme, and stanzaic structure.

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