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"Everything is in the Poem." - f

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  • Imeverybodynow
    replied
    Originally posted by Hear me all View Post
    When Forrest said everything you need is in the poem he was thinking about the word you because if a searcher who had figured out the first clue would study the slot instead of running down the road, they might have been able to find the U. It was the same when he said, "Simplify if you/u can.

    For anyone who cares, Forrest named the chest Tarzan because he felt like the King of Yellowstone. Yellowstone was his kingdom that he would bet on. Yellowstone was also Forrest's Indulgence. There will always be "those searchers" who think the think the spot is special because of pizza or some other totally unrelatable dumb concept based on the dumbest ideas EVER!
    I’m not so entirely sure if that is the case (with naming the chest Tarzan). I’m not saying your wrong either.

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  • Hear me all
    replied
    When Forrest said everything you need is in the poem he was thinking about the word you because if a searcher who had figured out the first clue would study the slot instead of running down the road, they might have been able to find the U. It was the same when he said, "Simplify if you/u can.

    For anyone who cares, Forrest named the chest Tarzan because he felt like the King of Yellowstone. Yellowstone was his kingdom that he would bet on. Yellowstone was also Forrest's Indulgence. There will always be "those searchers" who think the think the spot is special because of pizza or some other totally unrelatable dumb concept based on the dumbest ideas EVER!

    Leave a comment:


  • Imeverybodynow
    replied
    Or could it have been I’ve done it tired (hiding the chest) and now I’m. Weak (as in old- he’s already said he was tired.

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  • Imeverybodynow
    replied
    Originally posted by searcher2342 View Post
    "I've done it tired and now im weak" is the one phrase from the poem that kept me up at night. I still to this day cant make heads or tails of it. We have both past and present tenses.... We have a weak old man who later says " dont search where an 80 year old wouldnt go". Weak? I would say Forrest was never 'weak'. Anyone who fought off cancer, i doubt, would describe themselves as weak for hauling a treasure to a location.

    Then ill turn over on the other side of the bed and say " well anyone would be weak after that ordeal for half a day". But he did it tired first... before he became weak. So he was tired first then weak?



    Like i said... this line has haunted me lol.
    (This isn’t my interpretation, but what do you think? You sparked this idea just now)

    Could “ive done it tired” been his first trip to hide the chest, and then “and now I’m weak “ be the second trip when he brought the other half of the treasure (be it the box, or the loot; doesn’t matter), now he was definitely to weak to take multiple trips back to his car (that sparks another thought- I’ll keep that one to myself though ).

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  • wwwamericana
    replied
    In the poem -
    Like he gave us the components and we have to put it all together????
    Wait till you see MY fennished product......

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  • FlyFishBrown
    replied
    Originally posted by UNtitleD Brave View Post
    Sounds good FFB, or is it really 'FBF' ?
    I guess it could be Flashback Friday! #FBF

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  • UNtitleD Brave
    replied
    Sounds good FFB, or is it really 'FBF' ?

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  • FlyFishBrown
    replied
    Notice that ”If you’ve been wise and found the blaze” (stanza 4) is past tense. Weird right? Almost like we’ve surely missed something…

    Unless… we stop thinking in terms of the search/BOTG and start thinking in terms of just reading TTOTC and finally getting to understanding the poem. FF told us we needed to read the book, study/repeat the poem many times, and then read the book again for hints.

    FF is expecting by the time you read the poem and get to that line that you will have already been wise (already found and understood the meaning of his chase and blaze). It was given in the previous pages of TTOTC as the whole rationale for this crazy treasure hunt. FF goes further to write “ look quickly down, your quest to cease.” As you look QUICKLY DOWN THE POEM from stanza 4, the next stanza (stanza 5) reinforces the concept of the blaze. “Why is it that I must go and leave my trove for all to seek….” “Your quest to cease” is NOT the one to locate the chest (Stanzas 2-3 clues.). It’s the one to understand the blaze (know what you are looking for as his final marker.)

    FF would never answer the question asked if the blaze could be predetermined by the poem. He could have easily said no if that was the case. Instead he referred to the questioner as a rascal! This response and the fact that he didn’t answer is very telling, So yes, the blaze CAN be predetermined by the poem.

    So based on FF’s new found awareness that keeps him up past midnight in TTOTC (page 15), the chapter My War for Me, and his “done it tired” writings, we can ascertain the Blaze is the Asterick. FF doesn’t want to fall into a forgotten history. He’s written his book and placed his mark to go with it.

    The place where all his lines cross. The physical object that “in a word-yes” is one singular object but also not.

    I agree with you, everything is in the poem.
    Last edited by FlyFishBrown; 10-22-2021, 06:27 PM.

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  • larsonist
    replied
    Originally posted by larsonist View Post

    Screw Wyoming.
    The treasure was in New Mexico. You had to travel through Colorado (the home of Brown) to get it.
    Don't ever say you have a 'solution.' What you have is a delusional imagination and no confidence..
    A bad combination for treasure hunting.
    Apologies to Redneck Girl.
    What changed your mind from NM to that other state?

    Leave a comment:


  • larsonist
    replied
    Originally posted by Rose Livingstone View Post
    So, we know you’re not walking up that scree field because that’s suicidally stupid. So you’re looking ‘up’ the other way? What do you see here that is a continuation blaze from the small tree blaze?
    My mistake. I left out the latitude of the blaze.
    Tree: 36°59'29.52"N, 106°19'28.74"W
    Top of the boulder field (blaze): 36°59'27.26"N, 106°19'28.75"W

    You walk up either side of boulder field to the blaze.
    Two hundred feet. The blaze is fairly obvious.
    You carefully maneuver to the blaze and begin moving the smaller chunks around.
    Remember, Forrest had intended to make this his tomb.
    Last edited by larsonist; 06-20-2021, 02:02 PM.

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  • Ozzy
    replied
    Originally posted by Vertigo View Post

    I think this is the quote you're referring to:

    "I know you will not disclose the location, but was wondering if you would tell me whether anyone other than the retriever gave you the correct Home of Brown. I simple yes or no would make my day."
    Forrest responded: "No they did not sir. f"


    Are there any first hand accounts of someone telling Forrest, "The home of Brown is Nine Mile Hole"? If so, then I'll admit it's problematic. I just haven't seen that yet.

    Let's assume that Nine Mile Hole is indeed the home of Brown:
    If people merely told Forrest that they searched at Nine Mile Hole, that's not enough for him to answer yes to the question.
    If people told Forrest that the home of Brown is the home of brown trout, that's also not enough for him to answer yes to the question.

    What do you think?
    Your logic is sound. I personally would be shocked if at least one person didn’t send Forrest a nine mile hole = hoB email. Statistics say it more than likely happened but, truly I have no proof and as I stated initially, your logic works for me.

    With that said, I am moving past the nine mile hole solution much like the slough creek solution. the evidence doesn’t so far seem to support the area. But I am also comforted with the thought that others are still vetting nine mile and other areas. Hoping someone breaks something open soon.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rose Livingstone
    replied
    Originally posted by larsonist View Post

    This is what I have. It was posted in Canasta is GOLD!

    Osier is the train station in Colorado. 37° 0'45.15"N, 106°20'6.67"W
    You drive there.
    You drive down the dirt road to the Rio de los Pinos.
    You cross the river in your 4-wheel drive vehicle. 37° 0'1.37"N, 106°19'55.54"W
    You go up the other side.
    You park here: 36°59'50.65"N, 106°19'49.08"W
    You start walking downstream and cross the CO/NM border: 36°59'39.07"N, 106°19'40.47"W
    Walk to this small tree: 36°59'29.52"N, 106°19'28.74"W
    Look up 200 feet to the blaze: 106°19'28.75"W
    Climb up to the treasure chest.
    Done.
    So, we know you’re not walking up that scree field because that’s suicidally stupid. So you’re looking ‘up’ the other way? What do you see here that is a continuation blaze from the small tree blaze?

    Click image for larger version

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  • larsonist
    replied
    Originally posted by Old Pilot

    You seem pretty strongly convinced of a NM location. I'm not "in love with Wyoming" myself, but I'm not "in love with New Mexico" either, regarding
    where I think the hidey spot is located.
    If you would kindly post decimal -- all in degrees, with no minute ( ' ) or second ( " ) callouts -- coordinates, accurate to at least 6 decimal places, I'd be happy to use google earth to have a look at the location, and give my comments about it.
    This is what I have. It was posted in Canasta is GOLD!

    Osier is the train station in Colorado. 37° 0'45.15"N, 106°20'6.67"W
    You drive there.
    You drive down the dirt road to the Rio de los Pinos.
    You cross the river in your 4-wheel drive vehicle. 37° 0'1.37"N, 106°19'55.54"W
    You go up the other side.
    You park here: 36°59'50.65"N, 106°19'49.08"W
    You start walking downstream and cross the CO/NM border: 36°59'39.07"N, 106°19'40.47"W
    Walk to this small tree: 36°59'29.52"N, 106°19'28.74"W
    Look up 200 feet to the blaze: Top of the boulder field (blaze): 36°59'27.26"N, 106°19'28.75"W
    Climb up to the treasure chest.
    Done.
    (Added latitude to blaze, 6-20-2021)
    Last edited by larsonist; 06-20-2021, 02:16 PM.

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  • JHSharp
    replied
    Originally posted by Vertigo View Post

    I think this is the quote you're referring to:

    "I know you will not disclose the location, but was wondering if you would tell me whether anyone other than the retriever gave you the correct Home of Brown. I simple yes or no would make my day."
    Forrest responded: "No they did not sir. f"


    Are there any first hand accounts of someone telling Forrest, "The home of Brown is Nine Mile Hole"? If so, then I'll admit it's problematic. I just haven't seen that yet.

    Let's assume that Nine Mile Hole is indeed the home of Brown:
    If people merely told Forrest that they searched at Nine Mile Hole, that's not enough for him to answer yes to the question.
    If people told Forrest that the home of Brown is the home of brown trout, that's also not enough for him to answer yes to the question.

    What do you think?
    It seems possible that someone could have given Forrest a correct solution (or so close it was clear that they had solved it) without giving him HoB at all. The chances of guessing the correct spot without HoB would be next to zero, so it may just be that no one has ever named it specifically.

    Leave a comment:


  • wwwamericana
    replied
    I think it should be read not as "Poem" but rather MeOP......

    Leave a comment:

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