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  • Not Far...

    IIRC, Jack said he asked himself what is not far etc or what is near yet not close enough or some such. I always thought that this was the most cryptic yet poetic of the poem lines. What was the group consensus on this solution I wonder?

    I was thinking along the lines of: your own shadow; the horizon - 7 miles?; a rainbow; a baseball reference; simply, a distance previously referenced by F?; tomorrow; an area of land; walking through the valley of the shadow of death?; death itself; a combination of synonyms like "spring march" or even "march spring"; a literary reference ?

    Perhaps this speaks to a bigger question. I know Forrest said to simplify etc., but surely some of the lines are cryptic in nature?

  • #2
    He used the distance of 20 miles. Forrest liked to be 20 miles away from other people. He rode his bike 20 miles to bathe, so it must have been too long a distance to walk?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by deano View Post
      IIRC, Jack said he asked himself what is not far etc or what is near yet not close enough or some such. I always thought that this was the most cryptic yet poetic of the poem lines. What was the group consensus on this solution I wonder?

      I was thinking along the lines of: your own shadow; the horizon - 7 miles?; a rainbow; a baseball reference; simply, a distance previously referenced by F?; tomorrow; an area of land; walking through the valley of the shadow of death?; death itself; a combination of synonyms like "spring march" or even "march spring"; a literary reference ?

      Perhaps this speaks to a bigger question. I know Forrest said to simplify etc., but surely some of the lines are cryptic in nature?
      About 8.25 miles I figure, from that place where the warm water reservoirs halt, until you can put in south of the home of Brown.
      Hmm...where did I see that number before?

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      Which still pales in comparison to the 89 miles from hoB to NPFTM/TEIEDN.
      Why, you could almost say you could go "right straight to it".

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      • #4
        Originally posted by 1&Only1Trailblazer View Post
        He used the distance of 20 miles. Forrest liked to be 20 miles away from other people. He rode his bike 20 miles to bathe, so it must have been too long a distance to walk?
        Forrest walked 93 miles from West Yellowstone to Bozeman, so I don't think 20 miles is "too far to walk" based on Forrest's own counterexample.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by 1&Only1Trailblazer View Post
          He used the distance of 20 miles. Forrest liked to be 20 miles away from other people. He rode his bike 20 miles to bathe, so it must have been too long a distance to walk?
          The distance doesn't matter, because a person can walk thousands of miles. This has been discussed a long time ago. I believe that the "issue" isn't about distance, but rather about method of travel.

          I agree with this message, and approve of its content.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Old Pilot View Post

            The distance doesn't matter, because a person can walk thousands of miles. This has been discussed a long time ago. I believe that the "issue" isn't about distance, but rather about method of travel.

            I agree with this message, and approve of its content.
            I agree with you that it has nothing to do with distance. I disagree that it has anything to do with the method of transportation.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Zapster View Post

              I agree with you that it has nothing to do with distance. I disagree that it has anything to do with the method of transportation.
              I’m trying to understand your view. You’re at WWWH. You’re not moving by walking or apparently any other method- boat, plane, train, teleport, etc. So, do you continue the path in the same place? Is it less a journey than a sojourn? I know the Eliot quote about ending up where we began and knowing it for the first time, but does that mean you believe all nine clues can be solved while standing still?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Zapster View Post

                I agree with you that it has nothing to do with distance. I disagree that it has anything to do with the method of transportation.
                I've never been much of a fan of the old "time" argument, but if it works for you, I won't argue for a long time about it. Didn't Kermit the frog say "Time flies like an arrow"?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Rose Livingstone View Post
                  I’m trying to understand your view. You’re at WWWH. You’re not moving by walking or apparently any other method- boat, plane, train, teleport, etc. So, do you continue the path in the same place? Is it less a journey than a sojourn? I know the Eliot quote about ending up where we began and knowing it for the first time, but does that mean you believe all nine clues can be solved while standing still?
                  I believe that all nine clues could conceivably be solved while standing still, but spending hundreds of hours at a computer, working on a solve, is much more comfortable while sitting down. (Hee hee!)

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Old Pilot View Post

                    I believe that all nine clues could conceivably be solved while standing still, but spending hundreds of hours at a computer, working on a solve, is much more comfortable while sitting down. (Hee hee!)
                    Shirley, I would hope with “hundreds of hours” for a solve while standing in some water somewhere where it halts and also gets uncomfortable that someone would say with gusto, “this isn’t how I die, this is how I am born”. The actual number of hours is probably considerably higher.
                    Though, one has to consider, at some point you may have to walk your dog so they can pee on your neighbors’ fences. (and mailbox..and lamppost..and lime tree..)
                    Last edited by Rose Livingstone; 01-05-2021, 02:11 AM.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by 1&Only1Trailblazer View Post
                      He used the distance of 20 miles. Forrest liked to be 20 miles away from other people. He rode his bike 20 miles to bathe, so it must have been too long a distance to walk?
                      20 miles from the cross hairs of West Yellowstone is the start.. Gibbon hill.

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                      • #12
                        Walk-move at a regular pace by lifting and setting down each foot in turn, never having both feet off the ground at once.

                        So what’s not far but too far to walk? According to the definition above a simple answer off the top of my head could be a jump. You lift both feet off the ground when you jump. It’s not far...but that’s too far to walk.

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                        • #13
                          This will be my second winter I’m starting to get fattened up
                          for spring

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                          • #14
                            If you really want to know about "Not far, but too far to walk" it is not a geographic location you are looking for. In order to answer this one you will need to have the first two clues linked together on the map, only then will you understand this. Or you can continue along the lines of asking yourself "How long is a piece of string" or "How deep is a hole." Taken on its own it is impossible to get the answer, as it is pure conjecture.
                            Find "where warm waters halt" and then "canyon down" and then draw a line between them and then you will understand this line believe me. Until then it is a non clue.

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                            • #15
                              After I found my HoB, I retroactively measured it from my WWWH and it was surprisingly close to 10 miles, so I like to think that the famous Preface in TFTW was actually a legitimate hint in plain sight.

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