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  • #16
    this is my only one, i first read the poem in 2012. ive quit this thing many times. i came back the last time after my daughter died and it helped me alot. i know some bad things happened in the chase but some very good things happened too.

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    • #17
      Since I was little I have always been good at finding things, so I tried this poem because I felt that Mr. Fenn was telling the truth. What need did a man like him have to lie ? None of course. The big problem with treasure hunting is that probably a large part of them do not exist and if you do not choose well you can waste a lot of time on them. In Europe this treasure was not as well known as in the United States, therefore I found out about it very late, in December 2019 and although I believe that the poem took me to the correct location before it was found but it has been impossible for me to get up to it.

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      • #18
        My name is Cowboyrocker, and I am a treasure hunter....

        ...last time I ordered a new credit card at my bank and the lady in a grey suit asked me for my data... "Name?" "Cowboyrocker" "Birthdate?" "08/22/1971" "Profession?" "Treasure Hunter" "Adress?"

        She didn't even look up from her screen... just hacked all my answers into her computer.... poor grey girl... I realised, I've indeed become a treasure hunter, not only on my new credit card, but also mentally, after I realised this isn't my (business-)world anymore!
        „It‘s almost impossible to carry the torch of truth through a crowd without singeing somebody‘s beard.“
        G. C. Lichtenberg

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        • #19
          Meteorite hunter. Here is a nice relict cretaceous impactor. It came in as part of the kilometers-wide impactor that took out the dinosaurs 65 million years ago. Mine is possibly the largest piece in the world that's been found. Mine proved it was an iron meteorite that hit the dinosaurs. Very few were preserved, as iron rusts quickly, most irons not lasting even 100 years down here. The reason this one remained intact is because this fragment found its way to a fossilizing environment, like a mud that was already drying, much the way preserved animals become fossilized to stone. It is not iron anymore, it is stone. Observe that there are Neumann Lines, cracks inside of it that form as a remnant of the energy level of impacts in 0-gravity environment (space).
          Last edited by Leaf Blazeikson; 11-25-2020, 12:27 PM.

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          • #20
            When I first saw the Fenn Poem I thought it was cool but I put it in the back of my mind. I was not doing any treasure hunting. About six months later, I came across the poem again and told myself that it was something I could do. Three nights later, I felt I had solved the poem up to finding the blaze. Two weeks later, I found what I believed was the blaze. My son and I went to check out my spot but were turned back by snow and time. We were planning to go back but it didn't work out.

            I have looked at The Secret and believe I may have solved some of those but they are too far away to look for.

            I also looked at the Canadian Hideacase and think I have some good theories.

            Honestly, treasure hunting has been frustrating except for solving the Read and Seek puzzle that was based on the Fenn Poem.

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            • #21
              Nope. And now I KNOW I'm not.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by NadiyaM
                apparently treasure hunters never sleep....just look at the post times...))
                I enjoy collecting things, love history, only involved in one BIG treasure hunt before when a good friend called me about some clues.....it was a regional treasure hunt, with lots of publicity, prizes donated by businesses and cash etc.....We were looking for a medallion hidden in the central Arkansas area. Anyway my friend called and said he thought the medallion might be hidden somewhere in downtown Little Rock and I should go look...He warned me that a medallion could mean many different things and a hint told him that it might have a "view?"
                It was very very cold and snowing and for crying out loud, Christmas eve. Needless to say, with wife and kids at home the announcement that I was leaving on Christmas Eve was not at all well received. I walked the abandoned streets by myself for a very long time...alone and shivering in the cold. I called my friend and he encouraged me to not give up...the third or 4th time I walked down this street, I looked up and saw "something" on a lamp post. Even at 6' 7", I was barely able to reach it and pick at it with my fingers....It was an incredibly small piece of paper...(..think of a fortune cookie paper and then fold it once or twice..)..then use a piece of clear tape and stick it to a green metal post almost 9 ft high. When I unfolded it, it said congratulations you have found the medallion and won the Great Arkansas Treasure Hunt.!!
                What follows is VERY personal...and Im not sure why I share it....maybe an early case of holiday spirit...
                As I was driving back home that Christmas Eve, I began to marvel and how life can seem more like a collusion of experiences than a plan. How only a few years ago, I was penniless and now enjoyed a full middle class life. Then it hit me....the saddest day of my life came flooding back and it told me that what I had was not mine.
                You see it was exactly 10 years before at exactly the same time on Christmas Eve that I sat in an almost silent rec hall on a racetrack way up in Ohio. I was beyond broke and what little money I could scrounge went to feed my horse. I did any work possible for money but the racetrack only operated 3 days a week and many others were almost as destitute as I. Two good friends had quit their jobs and moved into the homeless shelter simply to get food and survive the brutal winter. I had taken to eating horse food to try and survive and was so skinny everyone just called me slim.
                The rec hall was quiet that night as about a dozen or two of us grimly passed the time. The tv was off and no one played pool or ping pong....a few shared stories of family they use to have or grown children they had not heard from in many years. Together we were a collection of outcasts and misfits, yet each alone in the world. About 9 o clock that night , the metal door of the rec hall burst open and there stood the always outlandish local Baptist preacher. ( also volunteered as the racetrack chaplain).....He had one of those silly red Santa Claus hats on his head and a strikingly beautiful lady dressed as an elf accompanied him.......Merry Christmas he began to roar and all eyes turned towards him.
                The smile on his face faded as he looked around the room....shocked at what he found , he quickly said....Okay Okay...He held a small plate of snacks.....He recognized most of our faces and now understood he had stumbled into an entire den of human misery....Okay Okay....He regained his composure and called out to us again...and said dont worry that he would be right back....He left his elf who had by now been joined by one other and departed. We were just all so excited to be remembered at all....I had not had anything to eat for 9 hours but limited myself to one finger sandwich that tasted absolutely heavenly.
                The mood was much brighter now as people mingled and smiled....in about 30 minutes or so the door flew open again....It was that crazy chaplain and the people kept just coming in behind him. It seems he had gone back and on Christmas Eve called a church member that owned a local deli....and they opened the deli and brought a feast along with about 10 other members. He gave us a quick Christmas lesson to feed our souls while he feed our stomachs....and then we all sang Christmas songs into the wee morning.
                So I was driving home on Christmas Eve 10 years later as tears began to well in my eyes as they are now sharing this with you. I realized this was more than a coincidence and this treasure was not mine to keep but only briefly entrusted to me as an opportunity to repay my debt.
                I turned the car around and drove to the local homeless shelter and began banging on the door.....at last a man began yelling from the other side....alright alright just hold on...He opened the door and quickly said that supper had already been served but maybe he could find a snack...then he stopped and looked at how I was dressed. I was still in pressed slack and a shirt, wearing a $500 leather jacked. Confused he then asked, Can I help you? I asked him if he had ever heard of the treasure hunt and he said yes of course...then I showed and gave him the medallion...He was very excited and said that among the prizes the big screen color tv would be welcome since their Tv had gone out last week.......I am not a huge believer in most organized religion...I can only imagine the faces of the families when that chaplain called them on Christmas Eve and asked them to come and minister to the outcasts. Many in that church had already fought against his ministry, labeling us a bunch of runaways and drunks. But that group that gathered to feed us that night embodied all that is good in the church and the world.
                thanks for letting me share my big treasure hunt with you.
                Thank you.
                Finding Jessica

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                • #23
                  Gold digger. Just kidding. Bought the book for my son for Christmas after hearing about the hunt on Expedition Unknown. He left it on the coffee table, I picked it up and the rest is history. Man Alone (what happened to him?) was the first YouTuber I came across and then found all the forums. I tried The Golden Owl but just can't get into it. I was attracted to this hunt when I found out Forrest was active in the community. It made it more interesting. More complicated but interesting. The more I researched the more I realized the thing missing in my life was using my brain. It needed dusting off after years of stagnation. Still looking for the next best thing to replace this...

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by kpro View Post
                    I was never in the adventures or hunts before FF chase. Mike was into all puzzles and treasure hunts. I loved sudoku and puzzles and such, but never a hunt. After the hunt ended, I am trying all the various hunts and nothing is like FF. The closest was tumble bear lode and, well, it didn’t last a week. So, are you a FF chaser or a treasure hunter (meaning all things puzzles). Just curious.
                    I started getting interested in treasure hunting about 55 years ago, when I started reading a book called "Hunting for Hidden Gold" (or something similar). It had stories about various "legends" such as
                    the Oak Island money pit (at/near the East Coast of Canada), the Thomas Beale cache (somewhere in or near Virginia), the bank vault door cemented into a cave entrance in a canyon in New Mexico, and Crystal Cave (near Barstow, California). I was in my teens reading this book, and at the time, it all seemed quite believable. Nowadays, less so. I mean, people who really have possession of great wealth are usually not dumb. Dummies don't accumulate that much wealth (except by inheritance). And smart people don't leave the goodies somewhere unsecured in a casual manner . . . except in
                    the case of Fenns chest of gold, etc. (in my opinion). I could believe that his cost (roughly half a million dollars or so) wasn't too big a hit on his lifestyle/finances, and that it all provided for him a lot
                    of entertainment, pleasure, sense of purpose, reason for living, etc.

                    The Fenn story is one I found by accident while on an airline flight. The story seemed potentially believable, and I got hooked on the idea of solving the poem and searching for the trove. But it's always been for the financial benefit(s), not for the satisfaction or challenge or experience of adventure/travel/scenery -- although I admit those have been impressive. I don't much like the ugliness that has been seen on the blogs in the last year (or maybe longer). But I have found some entertainment therein.

                    Puzzles in general don't much interest me . . . especially those like Sudoku. It's just guesswork about numbers! Are there any useful bits of info gained from it? Anything that helps others if you
                    share? I think painting or sculpting or something else creative is a better way to spend time. But I don't want to spend too much time bashing puzzles or people who create them or solve them.

                    Good luck to everyone still seeking the Fenn trove. Please do (as suggested on another blog) treasure the adventure, as I -- perhaps somewhat reluctantly -- admit to doing. And . . . about the stick
                    and rusty key, I think combining "stick" and "key" may help. You might even want to think about rust. And if you solve the poem, you might want to think about "keeping something zipped". Hee hee.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Leaf Blazeikson View Post
                      Meteorite hunter. Here is a nice relict cretaceous impactor. It came in as part of the kilometers-wide impactor that took out the dinosaurs 65 million years ago.
                      There are no recognized meteorites from the Chicxulub impact crater (nor fossil relicts) largely owing to how long ago the event happened. However, it was not a nickel-iron impactor -- it was almost certainly a chondrite. So even if your find was somehow a relict of an iron meteorite (which is highly doubtful), it certainly wasn't due to the Yucatan impactor.

                      Your picture is of insufficient resolution or quality to identify the specimen pictured, let alone identify Neumann lines in a true meteorite of that size. Btw Neumann lines are not "cracks": they are fine, parallel lines that you would never see without acid-etching a cut hexahedrite (or rarely an octahedrite) iron meteorite. I have acid-etched many iron meteorites, so I'm quite familiar with Neumann lines and Widmanstatten patterns.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Zapster View Post
                        There are no recognized meteorites from the Chicxulub impact crater (nor fossil relicts) largely owing to how long ago the event happened. However, it was not a nickel-iron impactor -- it was almost certainly a chondrite. So even if your find was somehow a relict of an iron meteorite (which is highly doubtful), it certainly wasn't due to the Yucatan impactor.

                        Your picture is of insufficient resolution or quality to identify the specimen pictured, let alone identify Neumann lines in a true meteorite of that size. Btw Neumann lines are not "cracks": they are fine, parallel lines that you would never see without acid-etching a cut hexahedrite (or rarely an octahedrite) iron meteorite. I have acid-etched many iron meteorites, so I'm quite familiar with Neumann lines and Widmanstatten patterns.
                        Oil drillers have actually pulled fossilized iron remnants of Chicxulub from deep water core samples. There are iron-rich varieties of CC metes, as well, I couldn't find anything on the iron content of Chixculub. I misused "Neumann lines." I don't know the name of the cracks created in meteoroid collisions, but this sample has them. This sample has retained this shine for 6 years since cutting. I found it in a limestone quarry (K/T layer) in South Texas. There is still a long way to go on science explaining what the iron did in that collision, and why there are lumps of it everywhere in that limestone. Most iron vaporized, new minerals were created. I likely have it all wrong on my sample.
                        I've etched a few myself, used to make guitar picks out of them, showing the striped Widmanstatten patterns. I used Canyon D in order to call my picks American.

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                        • #27
                          Canyon Diablo would be a good choice for a fairly stable iron from which to make a guitar pick (while also being of American provenance). I might favor Gibeon or Muonionalusta if I cared more about stability than the find country. Some beautiful knives are made from those two meteorites.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Zapster View Post
                            Canyon Diablo would be a good choice for a fairly stable iron from which to make a guitar pick (while also being of American provenance). I might favor Gibeon or Muonionalusta if I cared more about stability than the find country. Some beautiful knives are made from those two meteorites.
                            They should do meteorite swords on Forged In Fire and then etch. I guess they'd have to be ground/filed/fined down and not fully heated, to keep the kamacite intact. Canyon D would be great because of the lonsdaleite. Each blank would cost 10s of thousands lol. Maybe I'll stick with an ornate axe head for my idea; can find some that already have the shape and large enough size for under $1K. I found the BLM grid maps around Barringer and am one day thinking thoughts of finding more...
                            I found 6 lbs of mete shale at Odessa.

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                            • #29
                              A copy of The Whistle Pig is due to arrive in my mailbox soon. I will have some catching-up to do on that one.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Cowboyrocker View Post

                                We're more or less in the middle of the cold, hmmm?
                                Your effort will be worth the cold [shoulder of the finder]

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