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  • "Not this, but this." Distance Thinking.

    Still trying to figure this out. I was wondering about too far to walk.

    Specifically, if we look at the book, we can find two mentions of the distance traveled on the way "home." I was wondering if we can plug those numbers into the poem to gather the correct distance.

    In "The Long Ride Home" for example, Forrest mentions the distance of 50 miles between cities where he is let out of the car (on the way home).

    Then in "Buffalo Cowboys" he mentions "The long walk home was wet and cold..." We know that distance is seven miles, because the story tells us that. These are both curious distances because they occur in relation to distances involving the concept of walking/riding to home.

    Since we all know that home is the next clue, is it possible that we find these mentions of home and can then start seeing the distances as plug and play numbers to confirm roughly the distance in the canyon down that we must travel before arriving at home of Brown. For the purpose of this post, I'm not even bringing up whatever Brown might be. Just trying to see if it makes sense to find clues keyed off by words in the poem that can then be relocated within the text of the book and applied to solve the poem.

    So if we take 50 miles and 7 miles, perhaps that line should result to something like:

    Not 7 miles, but 50 miles. Because one of those distances he described as walk-able. It is important to note that in both instances he doesn't have his shoes on. It's a non-shoe wearing walk he's talking about in both instances.

    Isn't being without shoes an aberration?

    Not sure about any of this. Just trying to think how it might work out, in some world or another. The book has to solve those clues or that book is worthless.

    So if we look at the line "not far but too far to walk" we should probably be thinking about times he drove and times he walked in TTOTC. That "home" appears as a pinpoint clue in the next line might be assisting us in looking for a drive and a walk to "home." Whatever "home" is I'm not there yet, but I am starting to think that "home" is more important than Brown in that line. I think Brown will make sense once "home" makes sense. Trying to solve for the last part of that line before solving "home" or even "Put in below" might be a mistake everyone made (me too).

    Brown, in my opinion, was the biggest hang up for most searchers. It's because it appeared to have a proper noun, and in a world of confusing wwwh problems, we all wanted a shortcut to anywhere and to work backwards to wwwh or something. HoB teased us like that. I'm doing this slowly and I think I'm at nfbtftw.

    I've created about a dozen Snapple type answers for nfbtftw, but I think the answer is derived from the book itself and that guessing isn't wise. It's possible it's not a distance clue, but that doesn't make it very useful, right? If he's mentioning "far" twice as a distance measurement, then it's likely there's a plug in number for both those distances "not this, but this." That's the basic structure of that line.

    Not ____, but _____.

  • #2
    Regardless of what the books may say, you have to be able to interpret the poem using just the poem.
    If you can find a number in it then great, otherwise I think nfbtftw just means you don’t walk from wwwh
    down THE canyon to hob. In fact, I think your effort doesn’t start till you get out of your car. Remember he
    walked from W. Yellowstone to Bozeman as a kid-90 some miles, but a ten mile stretch of river was
    “too far to walk” later in life? My approach has always been visual as opposed to numerical. Read the poem,
    paint the picture, and look under every bush along the way(especially the pitchy scratchy ones)✌️

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by June Did Everything Right View Post
      Still trying to figure this out. I was wondering about too far to walk.

      Specifically, if we look at the book, we can find two mentions of the distance traveled on the way "home." I was wondering if we can plug those numbers into the poem to gather the correct distance.

      In "The Long Ride Home" for example, Forrest mentions the distance of 50 miles between cities where he is let out of the car (on the way home).

      Then in "Buffalo Cowboys" he mentions "The long walk home was wet and cold..." We know that distance is seven miles, because the story tells us that. These are both curious distances because they occur in relation to distances involving the concept of walking/riding to home.

      Since we all know that home is the next clue, is it possible that we find these mentions of home and can then start seeing the distances as plug and play numbers to confirm roughly the distance in the canyon down that we must travel before arriving at home of Brown. For the purpose of this post, I'm not even bringing up whatever Brown might be. Just trying to see if it makes sense to find clues keyed off by words in the poem that can then be relocated within the text of the book and applied to solve the poem.

      So if we take 50 miles and 7 miles, perhaps that line should result to something like:

      Not 7 miles, but 50 miles. Because one of those distances he described as walk-able. It is important to note that in both instances he doesn't have his shoes on. It's a non-shoe wearing walk he's talking about in both instances.

      Isn't being without shoes an aberration?

      Not sure about any of this. Just trying to think how it might work out, in some world or another. The book has to solve those clues or that book is worthless.

      So if we look at the line "not far but too far to walk" we should probably be thinking about times he drove and times he walked in TTOTC. That "home" appears as a pinpoint clue in the next line might be assisting us in looking for a drive and a walk to "home." Whatever "home" is I'm not there yet, but I am starting to think that "home" is more important than Brown in that line. I think Brown will make sense once "home" makes sense. Trying to solve for the last part of that line before solving "home" or even "Put in below" might be a mistake everyone made (me too).

      Brown, in my opinion, was the biggest hang up for most searchers. It's because it appeared to have a proper noun, and in a world of confusing wwwh problems, we all wanted a shortcut to anywhere and to work backwards to wwwh or something. HoB teased us like that. I'm doing this slowly and I think I'm at nfbtftw.

      I've created about a dozen Snapple type answers for nfbtftw, but I think the answer is derived from the book itself and that guessing isn't wise. It's possible it's not a distance clue, but that doesn't make it very useful, right? If he's mentioning "far" twice as a distance measurement, then it's likely there's a plug in number for both those distances "not this, but this." That's the basic structure of that line.

      Not ____, but _____.
      June Did Everything Right There are only three geographic locations in Stanza 2, "Not far but too far to walk" relates to the distance seen on your map between WWWH and Canyon down which when looked at on the map does not look far, just a couple of inches, but converted to miles on the map is over 60 miles. It does not relate to a geographic location. but a visual one.
      If you try to solve it it is about as sensible as asking "How long is a piece of string?" or "How deep is a hole?" not solvable in reality. Only when you see it on the map will you understand it IMO. But wish you well on trying to solve it because no one has, or ever will if you really think about it logically.

      Comment


      • #4
        I’ll give my opinion. Too far to walk means it’s about the length of a marathon. And it also confirms the briggs cipher that he put out for all to see. Because it says “RUN” South, west. Plus the cover is a creek. So he’s hinting at a creek being too far to walk. In my opinion the creek is so small you can’t walk up it. And there will also be no paddle up your creek because it’s a dried creek so you will end where you begin wwwh.
        And if you look in between the shadows it actually shows an arrow pointing down to the creek. Another little hint that the creek is too far to walk.
        Attached Files
        Last edited by Trailblazer99; 11-22-2020, 10:02 AM.

        Comment


        • #5
          Not far but too far to walk = take the water then you put in
          You don't think Forrest talked about knots for nothing now do ya.

          Comment


          • #6
            Forrest said repeatedly that the poem was straightforward with no subterfuge. IMO if TFTW doesn’t refer to distance then it is intentionally misleading. The poem doesn’t say that it’s too far to walk barefoot. It doesn’t say that it’s along a paved road so you’d drive there in your car rather than walk. It doesn’t say that it’s along a river so you’d be going by boat rather than walking (I’m not saying that it’s not along a paved road or a river, just that TFTW refers to distance rather than the mode of transportation).

            Maybe we should take a survey of people who aren’t familiar with the Chase. Someone with a disability might say 100 feet is too far to walk, while an ultra-endurance athlete might say 100 miles is too far to walk. However IMO the vast majority of people would say that TFTW is somewhere between 1 mile and 20 miles. If you were to ask 100 people you’d probably get a Gaussian distribution with a peak at about 10 miles. This is consistent with the preface to the book TFTW where Forrest tells us that TFTW is 10 miles. If TFTW is on the order of 10 miles, then Not far is probably somewhere in the 10-30 mile range. We don’t know if this is the straight line distance from point A to B or if this is the distance measured along the road (or river), but at least this gives us something to work with.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Redneck Girl View Post
              Forrest said repeatedly that the poem was straightforward with no subterfuge. IMO if TFTW doesn’t refer to distance then it is intentionally misleading. The poem doesn’t say that it’s too far to walk barefoot. It doesn’t say that it’s along a paved road so you’d drive there in your car rather than walk. It doesn’t say that it’s along a river so you’d be going by boat rather than walking (I’m not saying that it’s not along a paved road or a river, just that TFTW refers to distance rather than the mode of transportation).

              Maybe we should take a survey of people who aren’t familiar with the Chase. Someone with a disability might say 100 feet is too far to walk, while an ultra-endurance athlete might say 100 miles is too far to walk. However IMO the vast majority of people would say that TFTW is somewhere between 1 mile and 20 miles. If you were to ask 100 people you’d probably get a Gaussian distribution with a peak at about 10 miles. This is consistent with the preface to the book TFTW where Forrest tells us that TFTW is 10 miles. If TFTW is on the order of 10 miles, then Not far is probably somewhere in the 10-30 mile range. We don’t know if this is the straight line distance from point A to B or if this is the distance measured along the road (or river), but at least this gives us something to work with.
              I am not married to his distance in the Tftw book, simply because that clue should be solvable based On TTOTC alone, right?

              If ten miles is the distance, TTOTC should reveal that somehow. He’s moving toward home twice in that book. Both times he gives a distance measure. If he’s going to use home as a clue, then probably he’s going to....

              Shoot. I just thought of something!!!

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by June Did Everything Right View Post

                I am not married to his distance in the Tftw book, simply because that clue should be solvable based On TTOTC alone, right?

                If ten miles is the distance, TTOTC should reveal that somehow. He’s moving toward home twice in that book. Both times he gives a distance measure. If he’s going to use home as a clue, then probably he’s going to....

                Shoot. I just thought of something!!!
                I agree. If there is a hint for TFTW it's more likely to be in the book TTOTC than in the book TFTW. My reasoning for 10 miles isn't based on either book. It's simply what I think most people would consider TFTW. I think we both agree that TFTW refers to a distance and not an alternate means of transportation. You used 7 miles and 50 miles from TTOTC and got "Not 7 miles, but 50 miles". Did you mean "Not 50 miles, but 7 miles"? Using my numbers it would read "Not 30 miles, but 10 miles". At least we're both in the same ballpark.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I am honestly glad to see the solve being discussed. Most of us have walked thousands of miles in our lives. "Too far to walk" is pretty subjective, in my opinion, so probably should not have a simple
                  number value (say, a distance in miles) indicated. In fact, I didn't use any numbers at all, nor rely on them, in my solve. A person can walk hundreds of miles if able and having sufficient motivation. So
                  perhaps the "distance" (i.e., "not far") should be not something one should consider at all. Practicality may play into this instead. If, for example, you wanted to get from one side of the Mississippi River (say, near New Orleans) to the other, you could choose to follow the river upstream, and follow each of its tributaries upstream, until each one is narrow enough for you to step over. If you simply walk only, this is likely to involve many thousands of miles of walking. I don't think Forrest imagined any searchers planning/expecting to walk thousands of miles in search of his trove. But there are other ways to travel, and most rivers in this country have bridges crossing the rivers. Some of the bridges are parts of freeways, where walking is generally discouraged. It seems reasonable to me that travelling by automobile (instead of walking) would be applicable in this part of the search trip . . . for what it's worth. A bit of travel "not far but too far to walk" could be indicative of crossing over a river or canyon in a car, plane, train, or other similar vehicle. It has also been mentioned, on another blog, that Forrest may have been talking about not distance (as measurable in miles, feet, inches, or etc.) but in some other way that is associated with "travel". Time travel was mentioned, but I'm not buying into that approach, for several reasons. Time travel into the past is impossible. And time travel into the future is automatic and -- for most practical purposes -- unvariable. So we shouldn't over-complicate our thoughts about time travel. In very informal lingo, "too far to walk" means that if you have wheels conveniently available, use them instead of your feet. In my opinion, if you try to use numbers, you'll distract yourself from what might otherwise be a good solving method.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Old Pilot View Post
                    I am honestly glad to see the solve being discussed. Most of us have walked thousands of miles in our lives. "Too far to walk" is pretty subjective, in my opinion, so probably should not have a simple
                    number value (say, a distance in miles) indicated. In fact, I didn't use any numbers at all, nor rely on them, in my solve. A person can walk hundreds of miles if able and having sufficient motivation. So
                    perhaps the "distance" (i.e., "not far") should be not something one should consider at all. Practicality may play into this instead. If, for example, you wanted to get from one side of the Mississippi River (say, near New Orleans) to the other, you could choose to follow the river upstream, and follow each of its tributaries upstream, until each one is narrow enough for you to step over. If you simply walk only, this is likely to involve many thousands of miles of walking. I don't think Forrest imagined any searchers planning/expecting to walk thousands of miles in search of his trove. But there are other ways to travel, and most rivers in this country have bridges crossing the rivers. Some of the bridges are parts of freeways, where walking is generally discouraged. It seems reasonable to me that travelling by automobile (instead of walking) would be applicable in this part of the search trip . . . for what it's worth. A bit of travel "not far but too far to walk" could be indicative of crossing over a river or canyon in a car, plane, train, or other similar vehicle. It has also been mentioned, on another blog, that Forrest may have been talking about not distance (as measurable in miles, feet, inches, or etc.) but in some other way that is associated with "travel". Time travel was mentioned, but I'm not buying into that approach, for several reasons. Time travel into the past is impossible. And time travel into the future is automatic and -- for most practical purposes -- unvariable. So we shouldn't over-complicate our thoughts about time travel. In very informal lingo, "too far to walk" means that if you have wheels conveniently available, use them instead of your feet. In my opinion, if you try to use numbers, you'll distract yourself from what might otherwise be a good solving method.
                    I'm not happy to be using numbers, honestly, but I'm trying to figure that clue out and I'm stuck. So let's say it's not numbers--even though he provides measurable distances in both stories where he is heading toward "home."

                    Let me try to simplify a little bit. Do you think it's just a clue saying "drive your car into the canyon because you can't walk that far easily." This would make sense, but then it also sort of isn't a clue if this is the case. What I mean by that is if it's straightforward then there's nothing to be worked out or "solved" about it. It's a throwaway basically, right? Or is it vital that we know we have to drive into the canyon? This would rather quickly eliminate canyons one can enter by walking along the road or by any other means.

                    I'm thinking I've got wwwh and the canyon, but if this nfbtftw line isn't a clue, then I will move on to "Put in" and eventually "home of" and then "Brown" last of all.

                    One thing that is starting to bug me is the idea that maybe there was a damn physical map at wwwh and this is what you are supposed to take. He says "take it" like maybe there was something on site to find and then off you go and the rest of the clues will make sense because you found a map or something carved onto a rock or a tree. I say this because who has ever heard of a treasure hidden without a map. People may say that's what the poem is for, but what if the first two clues are actually "Begin it..." and "Take it." Like take a picture of the map or something. I'm starting to think we all thought about this wrong. Missing a key word like "Take it!"

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Redneck Girl View Post

                      I agree. If there is a hint for TFTW it's more likely to be in the book TTOTC than in the book TFTW. My reasoning for 10 miles isn't based on either book. It's simply what I think most people would consider TFTW. I think we both agree that TFTW refers to a distance and not an alternate means of transportation. You used 7 miles and 50 miles from TTOTC and got "Not 7 miles, but 50 miles". Did you mean "Not 50 miles, but 7 miles"? Using my numbers it would read "Not 30 miles, but 10 miles". At least we're both in the same ballpark.
                      Yes. This makes sense. It's so frustrating for me because I'm trying to resist the urge of dragging in things like "what I think." I'm trying to see what the hell he thought and how the poem's clues are resolved by hints in the book itself. I mean, those first few clues have to have hints to them in the book otherwise the book is useless and he lied to us about the hints solving the clues. Or, as he put it inside the book "clues sprinkled throughout the stories." He then later started calling them hints, but the book still cites "clues" in the pages of the stories.

                      I don't like that I keep seeing the same things across all three books. I think he was stamping certain things really hard. Like his childhood address. Why does he keep telling us that and showing us pictures of his childhood home. Why does he keep doubling down on showing us pictures of his various ID cards that have his hair color on them. It's driving me batty. There's not even a home at 1413 N Main anymore. Does he want us to mail something to that address or something, because we definitely don't need to know the address, right? Like, he could just have said he grew up in Temple TX. Instead, he keeps pinging his childhood home address. Why is he doing that?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by June Did Everything Right View Post

                        Yes. This makes sense. It's so frustrating for me because I'm trying to resist the urge of dragging in things like "what I think." I'm trying to see what the hell he thought and how the poem's clues are resolved by hints in the book itself. I mean, those first few clues have to have hints to them in the book otherwise the book is useless and he lied to us about the hints solving the clues. Or, as he put it inside the book "clues sprinkled throughout the stories." He then later started calling them hints, but the book still cites "clues" in the pages of the stories.

                        I don't like that I keep seeing the same things across all three books. I think he was stamping certain things really hard. Like his childhood address. Why does he keep telling us that and showing us pictures of his childhood home. Why does he keep doubling down on showing us pictures of his various ID cards that have his hair color on them. It's driving me batty. There's not even a home at 1413 N Main anymore. Does he want us to mail something to that address or something, because we definitely don't need to know the address, right? Like, he could just have said he grew up in Temple TX. Instead, he keeps pinging his childhood home address. Why is he doing that?
                        I've also wondered about his childhood address. I don't think it's pi backwards since that would be 2413. I thought it might be "one 4 one 3" or 43, a hint for the latitude. I don't really like that idea since I think it should be closer to YNP, but I could easily be wrong.

                        Brown hair could possibly hint at Pahaska Teepee. Pahaska means long hair. It was the name the Native Americans gave Buffalo Bill Cody. Looking at pictures it appears that his hair was brown.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Redneck Girl View Post

                          I've also wondered about his childhood address. I don't think it's pi backwards since that would be 2413. I thought it might be "one 4 one 3" or 43, a hint for the latitude. I don't really like that idea since I think it should be closer to YNP, but I could easily be wrong.

                          Brown hair could possibly hint at Pahaska Teepee. Pahaska means long hair. It was the name the Native Americans gave Buffalo Bill Cody. Looking at pictures it appears that his hair was brown.
                          Probably just trying to make his father proud . . . you know, by showing off his family's address.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by June Did Everything Right View Post

                            Yes. This makes sense. It's so frustrating for me because I'm trying to resist the urge of dragging in things like "what I think." I'm trying to see what the hell he thought and how the poem's clues are resolved by hints in the book itself. I mean, those first few clues have to have hints to them in the book otherwise the book is useless and he lied to us about the hints solving the clues. Or, as he put it inside the book "clues sprinkled throughout the stories." He then later started calling them hints, but the book still cites "clues" in the pages of the stories.

                            I don't like that I keep seeing the same things across all threebooks. I think he was stamping certain things really hard. Like his childhood address. Why does he keep telling us that and showing us pictures of his childhood home. Why does he keep doubling down on showing us pictures of his various ID cards that have his hair color on them. It's driving me batty. There's not even a home at 1413 N Main anymore. Does he want us to mail something to that address or something, because we definitely don't need to know the address, right? Like, he could just have said he grew up in Temple TX. Instead, he keeps pinging his childhood home address. Why is he doing that?

                            In my opinion, the numbers of his address , just happen to coincide with a forest service road very near the hidey spot .A while back , Fenndy posted an answer to something , coming up with the letter A . This coincides with the service road as well . Good Luck to you !

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