Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

F's rebuttal of 'mining artifacts' - circa 2000

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • F's rebuttal of 'mining artifacts' - circa 2000

    Magazine link here (long article):
    https://kb.osu.edu/dspace/bitstream/handle/1811/55939/OHIO_ARCHAEOLOGIST_50_2_SPRING_2000.pdf


    TL;DR highlights:
    "He questioned whether he should have attended the conference at all because it had been put on by me, a collector and avocational archaeologist. He said I had been "accused" of "mining artifacts" in a pre-contact pueblo that I own. For Dr. Watkins, mining artifacts refers to the excavation of an archaeological site by someone without a Ph.D. in archaeology."

    "The Society of American Archaeology (SAA) hates to see commercial traffic in archaeological material, yet one must ask which is more important - the education of the public or the perceived ethics of the SAA?"

    "Shadowy excuses mask what everyone knows to be true: it is the written reports and photographs of both artifacts in situ and museum displays that hone the tools of those who would vandalize archaeological sites looking for what they have seen in print or on exhibit. The premise is that those looted objects are sold to collectors, which promotes further looting. To a degree that is true, albeit a tertiary reason."


    "Each year, state and federal governments spend millions of taxpayers' dollars to survey, excavate, protect, preserve, conserve and curate the archaeology of the United States. What does the average American citizen get for his money? Most of the results appear as unpublished contract reports written in an oppressive technical jargon that the public cannot decipher."

    "I have often wondered why a professional archaeologist who excavates (the site is necessarily destroyed in the process) is viewed with respect while an avocational archaeologist is accused of mining for artifacts."

    "Here is some advice and a few observations from a collector to the SAA.

    1. I am born of you and am nourished by your lectures, your reports, and your beautiful museum displays. Thank you for giving me life.
    2. Leave the jargon at home. Your future depends on increased public interest, and that's where your future funding will originate. If 14-year-old students don't understand your report, you're doing it wrong. And incidentally, color in books is OK.
    3. Stop whining about what amateurs are doing. You have bigger problems at home, like unreported field work, for starters.
    4. Collectors are not going away, and you're heavily outnumbered. Get used to it and learn from them.
    5. Don't get carried away with your importance. Private property rights come first, now and always.
    6. If it's a Canis Latrans bone, give us a break; say it's part of a coyote.
    7. Your peers already know you're smart, so write for the rest of us sometime. We'll buy your book and read it; they probably won't.
    8. Lighten up. It's not as if dreaded diseases are being cured or famines being prevented by archaeology. You should be enjoying it more."

  • #2
    Still SMH at Forrest .
    This article causes me to grin every time I read it.
    With the birds I'll share this lonely viewin"

    Comment


    • #3
      Simply stated, yet too complex.
      If Forrest said it was a coyote - we'd all be looking for something more.
      Get the point here?

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by wwwamericana View Post
        Simply stated, yet too complex.
        If Forrest said it was a coyote - we'd all be looking for something more.
        Get the point here?
        Something more like this?
        Click image for larger version

Name:	Screenshot_20201121-161542_Samsung Internet.jpg
Views:	136
Size:	479.1 KB
ID:	224278
        The thrill of the chase!

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Not4but242Walk View Post
          Magazine link here (long article):
          https://kb.osu.edu/dspace/bitstream/handle/1811/55939/OHIO_ARCHAEOLOGIST_50_2_SPRING_2000.pdf


          TL;DR highlights:
          "He questioned whether he should have attended the conference at all because it had been put on by me, a collector and avocational archaeologist. He said I had been "accused" of "mining artifacts" in a pre-contact pueblo that I own. For Dr. Watkins, mining artifacts refers to the excavation of an archaeological site by someone without a Ph.D. in archaeology."

          "The Society of American Archaeology (SAA) hates to see commercial traffic in archaeological material, yet one must ask which is more important - the education of the public or the perceived ethics of the SAA?"

          "Shadowy excuses mask what everyone knows to be true: it is the written reports and photographs of both artifacts in situ and museum displays that hone the tools of those who would vandalize archaeological sites looking for what they have seen in print or on exhibit. The premise is that those looted objects are sold to collectors, which promotes further looting. To a degree that is true, albeit a tertiary reason."


          "Each year, state and federal governments spend millions of taxpayers' dollars to survey, excavate, protect, preserve, conserve and curate the archaeology of the United States. What does the average American citizen get for his money? Most of the results appear as unpublished contract reports written in an oppressive technical jargon that the public cannot decipher."

          "I have often wondered why a professional archaeologist who excavates (the site is necessarily destroyed in the process) is viewed with respect while an avocational archaeologist is accused of mining for artifacts."

          "Here is some advice and a few observations from a collector to the SAA.

          1. I am born of you and am nourished by your lectures, your reports, and your beautiful museum displays. Thank you for giving me life.
          2. Leave the jargon at home. Your future depends on increased public interest, and that's where your future funding will originate. If 14-year-old students don't understand your report, you're doing it wrong. And incidentally, color in books is OK.
          3. Stop whining about what amateurs are doing. You have bigger problems at home, like unreported field work, for starters.
          4. Collectors are not going away, and you're heavily outnumbered. Get used to it and learn from them.
          5. Don't get carried away with your importance. Private property rights come first, now and always.
          6. If it's a Canis Latrans bone, give us a break; say it's part of a coyote.
          7. Your peers already know you're smart, so write for the rest of us sometime. We'll buy your book and read it; they probably won't.
          8. Lighten up. It's not as if dreaded diseases are being cured or famines being prevented by archaeology. You should be enjoying it more."
          Reminds me of forrests very first blog post at his website. Nobody probably read it until after the treasure hunt began. Expensive way to start a revenge plot

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Not4but242Walk View Post
            Magazine link here (long article):
            https://kb.osu.edu/dspace/bitstream/handle/1811/55939/OHIO_ARCHAEOLOGIST_50_2_SPRING_2000.pdf


            TL;DR highlights:
            "He questioned whether he should have attended the conference at all because it had been put on by me, a collector and avocational archaeologist. He said I had been "accused" of "mining artifacts" in a pre-contact pueblo that I own. For Dr. Watkins, mining artifacts refers to the excavation of an archaeological site by someone without a Ph.D. in archaeology."

            "The Society of American Archaeology (SAA) hates to see commercial traffic in archaeological material, yet one must ask which is more important - the education of the public or the perceived ethics of the SAA?"

            "Shadowy excuses mask what everyone knows to be true: it is the written reports and photographs of both artifacts in situ and museum displays that hone the tools of those who would vandalize archaeological sites looking for what they have seen in print or on exhibit. The premise is that those looted objects are sold to collectors, which promotes further looting. To a degree that is true, albeit a tertiary reason."


            "Each year, state and federal governments spend millions of taxpayers' dollars to survey, excavate, protect, preserve, conserve and curate the archaeology of the United States. What does the average American citizen get for his money? Most of the results appear as unpublished contract reports written in an oppressive technical jargon that the public cannot decipher."

            "I have often wondered why a professional archaeologist who excavates (the site is necessarily destroyed in the process) is viewed with respect while an avocational archaeologist is accused of mining for artifacts."

            "Here is some advice and a few observations from a collector to the SAA.

            1. I am born of you and am nourished by your lectures, your reports, and your beautiful museum displays. Thank you for giving me life.
            2. Leave the jargon at home. Your future depends on increased public interest, and that's where your future funding will originate. If 14-year-old students don't understand your report, you're doing it wrong. And incidentally, color in books is OK.
            3. Stop whining about what amateurs are doing. You have bigger problems at home, like unreported field work, for starters.
            4. Collectors are not going away, and you're heavily outnumbered. Get used to it and learn from them.
            5. Don't get carried away with your importance. Private property rights come first, now and always.
            6. If it's a Canis Latrans bone, give us a break; say it's part of a coyote.
            7. Your peers already know you're smart, so write for the rest of us sometime. We'll buy your book and read it; they probably won't.
            8. Lighten up. It's not as if dreaded diseases are being cured or famines being prevented by archaeology. You should be enjoying it more."
            Thanks for sharing that. I was looking to see what his writing looked like outside of the memoirs. That guy's a pretty fierce writer. I'm 90 percent certain that a lot of Forrest's collection will likely end up in a museum. I'm kind of hoping they turn his house into a little museum. I'd just like to go see it and look at his bookshelves.

            Comment

            Working...
            X