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Morse Code in the poem solved

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  • Morse Code in the poem solved

    I thought I'd let this one out.

    Since Forrest knew Morse Code, I had the idea that he might have used it in the Poem.
    Remember that he made an issue of commas, and even removed them from one of his Scrapbooks.
    Then there's also this, from one of Jenny Kyle's "Featured Questions."
    https://mysteriouswritings.com/featu...-rainy-season/

    Forrest's answer starts out with this:
    "Since I hid my treasure I can’t get by with any malfunctions in my writing. I received emails from two English teachers who criticized my use of commas and semi colons, and each one corrected me in a different way."
    Bold is mine to highlight the hints.

    Here's the rules.
    - use commas for dashes
    - use periods for dots
    - use only the punctuation marks at the end of the lines.

    Now, I needed some means to break these apart to form letters.
    This is where the commas in the middle of the lines comes in, they are the "breaks" (pauses in Morse Code) that I needed.
    But there's more to it, the "different way" part. And that's where the semi colons come in.

    So go down the Poem and pick these out.
    Line 2 - comma at the end = dash
    Line 3 - comma at the end = dash
    Line 4 - period at the end = dot
    Line 6 - comma at the end = dash
    Line 7 - comma in the middle = letter break
    That gives a dash dash dot dash (- - . -) That's a Q.
    Line 7 (again) - period at the end = dot
    Line 8 - period at the end = dot
    Line 9 - comma at the end = dash

    Now here's where it starts the "different".
    Line 10 ends in that semi colon.
    This brought up the QUESTION of what to do with this.
    Well, it's a dot dash, and furthermore it's an automatic break, before and after, a new letter on it's own. (Dot dash is an "a".)

    This post is starting to act funky, so I'll continue it in a reply post.

    So line 9 is the end of a letter, and that's dot dot dash ( . . - ), which = U.
    (Coming after a Q already starts to make sense.)

    Then Line 10, with it's semi colon at the end, = A

    And now we start a new letter because of that automatic break, before and after.





  • #2
    Ok, so far we have QUA.

    Lets continue after Line 10.

    Line 11 - comma at the end = dash
    Line 12 - period at the end = dot
    Line 13 - comma at the end = dash
    Line 14 - comma in the middle = letter break
    That gives us a dash dot dash ( - . - ), which is a K.
    Now we have a word, "QUAK", and this is acceptable in the official rules to skip a letter like this for convenience.
    So we have QUACK.

    Lets continue.
    Line 14 (again) - comma at the end = dash
    Line 15 - comma at the end = dash
    Line 16 - period at the end = dot
    Line 18 - ? mark at the end. This is another QUESTION, as above.
    In other words, it's another "a".
    So the previous dash dash dot ( - - . ) is a G
    And we have this ? being another A.

    Onward...
    Line 19 - comma at the end = dash
    Line 20 - comma in the middle = letter break.
    We now have a dash ( - ) = T.
    Line 20 (again) - period at the end = dot
    But here, we also have TWO apostrophes to go along with the comma in the middle of the line.
    And Forrest, at the end of his comment at Jenny's, said this:

    "But don’t you think I should get high marks for doing the best I can?
    Here’s my first attempt at fiction, and it may contain some errors."


    This is another break point, before and after.
    So now we have a dot = E.

    Line 21 - comma at the end = dash
    Line 22 - period at the end = dot
    Line 24 - period at the end = dot

    So it finishes with a dash dot dot. ( - . . ) = D.

    Quak Gated. (Quack Gated).

    And yes, I have the meaning of this figured out. It's pretty cool stuff.
    But that's for my book, and I am sorry for this brash advertising, and for a book that won't be out for at least a year, no less.
    Last edited by Walker; 11-16-2020, 03:03 PM.

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    • #3
      Walker, that sure is some clever and profound deciphering you've done there! Not sure if it's correct, but I'll consider it legit just because of the time you spent!

      Rhett, I surely do hope your fair feathered friends are listenin' . . . someone may have left the gate open! Now how's a girl ever suppose to get any privacy 'round here?

      Comment


      • #4
        Now that’s another pointer to Dewey’s Gateway, sunlight basin..

        Comment


        • #5
          Just an FYI "Walker"......i had originally posted a "Morse Code solution" on 9/23/2020 in the 'A message from the "Finder" ' thread.....here is that link to the post I made. You will find the details under - LAYER #1 within that post.

          https://www.hintofriches.com/forum/t...508#post200508

          It was reposted again in a summary on this post dated 11/09/2020:

          https://www.hintofriches.com/forum/t...224#post221224

          Basically, I found it to be the distance required to travel from clue #1 to clue #9.
          - IMO - a tribute to John Morse - the helo pilot who pulled him out of the Laos jungle during his Vietnam "adventure".

          Best regards and be safe.
          Tim
          Last edited by Tim (ZosoRocks); 11-16-2020, 03:40 PM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Tim (ZosoRocks) View Post
            Just an FYI "Walker"......i had originally posted a "Morse Code solution" on 9/23/2020 in the 'A message from the "Finder" ' thread.....here is that link to the post I made. You will find the details under - LAYER #1 within that post.

            https://www.hintofriches.com/forum/t...508#post200508

            It was reposted again in a summary on this post dated 11/09/2020:

            https://www.hintofriches.com/forum/t...224#post221224

            Basically, I found it to be the distance required to travel from clue #1 to clue #9.
            - IMO - a tribute to John Morse - the helo pilot who pulled him out of the Laos jungle during his Vietnam "adventure".

            Best regards and be safe.
            Tim
            Thanks, Tim.
            This is interesting. I've found so many "double entendres" in this Chase that I have to wonder if both might not be possible, just as you said with "layers."

            Tim!
            I just checked my solve.
            It's 2.25 miles (from your Morse Code solution) from my WWWH to "Not Far, But Too Far To Walk" in my solution.
            And that's the only line in the Poem that actually begs the question of distance.
            Last edited by Walker; 11-16-2020, 04:32 PM.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Walker View Post

              Thanks, Tim.
              This is interesting. I've found so many "double entendres" in this Chase that I have to wonder if both might not be possible, just as you said with "layers."


              Tim!
              I just checked my solve.
              It's 2.25 miles (from your Morse Code solution) from my WWWH to "Not Far, But Too Far To Walk" in my solution.
              And that's the only line in the Poem that actually begs the question of distance.
              Morse was the co pilot and rescue commander...
              Lance Eagan was the pilot...Eagan was a bad ass!
              Click image for larger version  Name:	3397808_1483235520.jpg Views:	76 Size:	15.2 KB ID:	222877
              Last edited by Indulge me; 11-17-2020, 12:14 AM.

              Comment


              • #8
                There is a problem, Walker:

                THOR forum (8/14/2018): “Fenn clarifies – as discussed in chat – Does the semi-colon have specific meaning for the correct solve? If so, what?”

                Forrest: “No. f”

                “Does punctuation have significance in solving the poem? If so, what?”

                Forrest: “No. f”

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Zapster View Post
                  There is a problem, Walker:

                  THOR forum (8/14/2018): “Fenn clarifies – as discussed in chat – Does the semi-colon have specific meaning for the correct solve? If so, what?”

                  Forrest: “No. f”

                  “Does punctuation have significance in solving the poem? If so, what?”

                  Forrest: “No. f”
                  I never said it solves the poem.
                  It's a hint. It helps you solve other hints. You don't need this one, or any single hint. You have to tie enough together to figure out the answers.
                  People think there are those BIG hints (one or a few) that will lead them to the solution. There isn't. That's why it's so tough.
                  "Difficult, but not impossible."

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Think of it this way, Zap.
                    As an architect, what all do you have to design to tell the builder what to do for that finished wall?
                    There's quite a number of components. The studs, braces, covering (drywall or), electrical wiring and junction boxes, etc., and all the directions for location and spacing and etc.

                    Comment

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