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  • Forrest as the Wizard of Oz

    Hi Everyone,

    Forrest had a friend named Jim Parsons who was a big influence in the western art trade and eventually wrote a book called Art Fever on his experiences.
    Click image for larger version

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    I had noticed that Forrest had several copies of the book on his shelves and thought I would see if he would sell one. One copy was a limited edition that had a tipped-in original water color and a lengthy inscription from Jim to Forrest. Forrest didn't want to part with that copy. There was a copy that had Forrest's book plate inside it but no inscription from Jim. I was somewhat interested in that copy, but hoping for something better. The final copy we agreed on - it had an inscription from Jim but wasn't so special that Forrest cared about keep it. So the deal was struck and I had Forrest sign right below Jim's inscription.
    Click image for larger version

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ID:	213417

    The book sat for a few weeks on my shelf before I got around to reading it. Towards the end in Chapter 23, I came upon this quote from Shakespeare that I thought was interesting because it is the same section of As You Like It that Forrest cites.
    Click image for larger version

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    Then I flipped to chapter 24 and saw this:
    Click image for larger version

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    Forrest had signed the book years ago on this page and left it sitting on his shelf all that time. I couldn't figure out why he would do that until I noticed that the chapter was about Forrest and aptly titled The Wizard of Oz. Then I saw the "passed this veil" quote, which matches exactly (except "vale" is substituted for "veil") the verse in The Thrill of the Chase. Mencken's version is significantly different from The Thrill of the Chase version so this is likely the original source. Did Forrest tell Jim that waterfall story all those years ago and Jim decided to include the quote?
    Also on this page is Millay's "Second Fig" poem, which Forrest quotes in The Thrill of the Chase (Forrest also quotes her "First Fig" poem as well).

    And then in the next chapter is this poem, which you will recognize:
    Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_2814.jpg
Views:	726
Size:	1.00 MB
ID:	213422
    This is the exact wording as in Thrill of the Chase so this is also the original source as opposed to Ernest Tubb.

    Altogether, Forrest included four verses from Art Fever into The Thrill of the Chase.

    Interestingly, if one takes the line "and leave my trove for all to seek" and reverses it to:
    keesotllarofevortymevaeldna
    One can start to see:
    keesotll ARO FEVOR TYME VAEL dna
    Correcting Forrest's spelling errors gives:
    ART FEVER TIME VALE (VEIL) When I have passed this vale/veil

    Russ
    Attached Files

  • #2
    Originally posted by RussDana View Post
    Hi Everyone,

    Forrest had a friend named Jim Parsons who was a big influence in the western art trade and eventually wrote a book called Art Fever on his experiences.
    Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_2812.jpg
Views:	801
Size:	979.6 KB
ID:	213416

    I had noticed that Forrest had several copies of the book on his shelves and thought I would see if he would sell one. One copy was a limited edition that had a tipped-in original water color and a lengthy inscription from Jim to Forrest. Forrest didn't want to part with that copy. There was a copy that had Forrest's book plate inside it but no inscription from Jim. I was somewhat interested in that copy, but hoping for something better. The final copy we agreed on - it had an inscription from Jim but wasn't so special that Forrest cared about keep it. So the deal was struck and I had Forrest sign right below Jim's inscription.
    Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_2813.jpg
Views:	732
Size:	1.10 MB
ID:	213417

    The book sat for a few weeks on my shelf before I got around to reading it. Towards the end in Chapter 23, I came upon this quote from Shakespeare that I thought was interesting because it is the same section of As You Like It that Forrest cites.
    Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_2817.jpg
Views:	735
Size:	898.4 KB
ID:	213418

    Then I flipped to chapter 24 and saw this:
    Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_2818.jpg
Views:	724
Size:	981.1 KB
ID:	213419

    Forrest had signed the book years ago on this page and left it sitting on his shelf all that time. I couldn't figure out why he would do that until I noticed that the chapter was about Forrest and aptly titled The Wizard of Oz. Then I saw the "passed this veil" quote, which matches exactly (except "vale" is substituted for "veil") the verse in The Thrill of the Chase. Mencken's version is significantly different from The Thrill of the Chase version so this is likely the original source. Did Forrest tell Jim that waterfall story all those years ago and Jim decided to include the quote?
    Also on this page is Millay's "Second Fig" poem, which Forrest quotes in The Thrill of the Chase (Forrest also quotes her "First Fig" poem as well).

    And then in the next chapter is this poem, which you will recognize:
    Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_2814.jpg
Views:	726
Size:	1.00 MB
ID:	213422
    This is the exact wording as in Thrill of the Chase so this is also the original source as opposed to Ernest Tubb.

    Altogether, Forrest included four verses from Art Fever into The Thrill of the Chase.

    Interestingly, if one takes the line "and leave my trove for all to seek" and reverses it to:
    keesotllarofevortymevaeldna
    One can start to see:
    keesotll ARO FEVOR TYME VAEL dna
    Correcting Forrest's spelling errors gives:
    ART FEVER TIME VALE (VEIL) When I have passed this vale/veil

    Russ
    Awesome post! Super interesting.

    Comment


    • #3
      Abstract Art. And there’s no place like Home

      Comment


      • #4
        Very good eye

        Comment


        • #5
          This tells me He knew what he was doing the whole time. And they say IT can’t be done. Yeeeehaaaa. Put that in your pipe and smoke it

          Comment


          • #6
            Excellent

            Comment


            • #7
              Thanks for this Russdana. I find this very difficult nteresting about the WOZ here. I'm not the only one I'm sure, but I saw the Wizard of Oz in the poem word meanings for my solve such as:

              No place for the meek -Dorothy said " I am meek" in the movie.
              Brave and in the wood-The lion , he was hiding in the woods
              Tarry scant with marvel gaze- The professors name is Marvel and he gazed into a crystal ball. He saw aunt M was sick and Dorothy panicked and ran back home.

              Plus other things relative but those are the main ones. I know a few others talked about these points over time but noticed others had after I had searched relative words throughout the chase community . So, if many people think the same thing then there's a possibility it might have merit .

              The WOZ was about the global gold stabdard wtiuten as a kid story. This was the meaning of " have a kid read it" , to me.

              Good find and thanks for showing a potential confirmation.

              Much appreciated.

              Cheers!

              Comment


              • #8
                I got to see this movie now. Definitely bring a kid along. But why make them wait in the car? If the kid was your search partner??

                Comment


                • #9
                  A dirty Hessian uses a sword to get ahead too

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Hi Russ -- it's interesting that Jim Parsons' version of Forrest's two quotes are each inconsistent with what's in TTOTC. Since H. L. Mencken's original version of the first quote is clearly the true original source (it predates the First Indochina War, 1946-1954, by at least 25 years), it seems Jim wasn't familiar with it. The Edna St. Vincent Millay quote (Second Fig) also has a mistake:

                    “Safe upon the solid rock the ugly houses stand: Come and see my shining palace built upon the sand!”

                    Forrest has it correct in TTOTC (pg. 136), while Parsons has shiney (sic, both on the word and the spelling).

                    The "Life is a game of poker" that Happy heard from his grandmother is either a mis-remembrance of what his grandmother said, or the grandmother misremembered those lyrics from Jack Yellen's I'm Waiting For Ships that Never Come In (1919). The song has been covered many times: Art Gilham (1927), Franklyn Baur (1928), Maurice Gunsky (1928), Gene Krupa + his orchestra (1940), Kay Starr (1955), Mac Wiseman (1956), Moon Mullican (1958), Ernest Tubb (as mentioned above by Russ) (1959) and Jim Reeves (1961).




                    Comment


                    • #11
                      By the way, H. L. Mencken was known as the "Sage of Baltimore" -- just one more reason I liked my Sage Creek as the answer to "Not far, but too far to walk".

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I cant sea it , maybe I’m not bright enough
                        i might circle back to it
                        Last edited by Old blue; 10-19-2020, 05:17 PM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Alsetenash View Post
                          Thanks for this Russdana. I find this very difficult nteresting about the WOZ here. I'm not the only one I'm sure, but I saw the Wizard of Oz in the poem word meanings for my solve such as:

                          No place for the meek -Dorothy said " I am meek" in the movie.
                          Brave and in the wood-The lion , he was hiding in the woods
                          Tarry scant with marvel gaze- The professors name is Marvel and he gazed into a crystal ball. He saw aunt M was sick and Dorothy panicked and ran back home.

                          Plus other things relative but those are the main ones. I know a few others talked about these points over time but noticed others had after I had searched relative words throughout the chase community . So, if many people think the same thing then there's a possibility it might have merit .

                          The WOZ was about the global gold stabdard wtiuten as a kid story. This was the meaning of " have a kid read it" , to me.

                          Good find and thanks for showing a potential confirmation.

                          Much appreciated.

                          Cheers!
                          Thanks! I had thought of your second and third poem references but had missed the Dorothy quote from the movie.
                          I had thought that perhaps WOZ could reference something like the Emerald Pool (since the first half of WOZ is the quest for the Emerald City) but Forrest said the clues didn't exist when he was a kid and I think the WOZ movie came out in 1939. Forrest probably still qualified as a kid at nine years old. So I am not quite sure what to do with all the WOZ references.
                          Russ

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Zapster View Post
                            Hi Russ -- it's interesting that Jim Parsons' version of Forrest's two quotes are each inconsistent with what's in TTOTC. Since H. L. Mencken's original version of the first quote is clearly the true original source (it predates the First Indochina War, 1946-1954, by at least 25 years), it seems Jim wasn't familiar with it. The Edna St. Vincent Millay quote (Second Fig) also has a mistake:

                            “Safe upon the solid rock the ugly houses stand: Come and see my shining palace built upon the sand!”

                            Forrest has it correct in TTOTC (pg. 136), while Parsons has shiney (sic, both on the word and the spelling).

                            The "Life is a game of poker" that Happy heard from his grandmother is either a mis-remembrance of what his grandmother said, or the grandmother misremembered those lyrics from Jack Yellen's I'm Waiting For Ships that Never Come In (1919). The song has been covered many times: Art Gilham (1927), Franklyn Baur (1928), Maurice Gunsky (1928), Gene Krupa + his orchestra (1940), Kay Starr (1955), Mac Wiseman (1956), Moon Mullican (1958), Ernest Tubb (as mentioned above by Russ) (1959) and Jim Reeves (1961).



                            Thanks Zap - that is good research - I had missed those details. It is interesting that sometimes Forrest quotes perfectly and sometimes there are errors (but certainly more errors than not). But then the whole TTOTC is so filled with errors ...
                            Russ

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              (front dust cover of TTOTC)
                              notice anything ?
                               
                              Last edited by Street Scenes 333; 10-19-2020, 06:27 PM.
                              Net Flicks

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