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  • My Wyoming solve

    Since I no longer have to defend my NM solve, I’m free to come up with ideas for Wyoming. Maybe someone could look at this and tell me if I’m on the right track.

    My current solve is along the Snake River between the south boundary of YNP and the north boundary of GTNP (the north end of Jackson Lake). If this is correct, then it means the treasure was not in a National Park.

    WWWH: Shoshone Geyser Basin in YNP. The Shoshone geyser basin contains one of the highest concentrations of geysers in the world. It also has hot springs and mudpots.
    Zapster You were the one who convinced me that WWWH was is YNP. I think you said something like even a child would think warm waters meant Yellowstone.

    Canyon down: Take the Lewis River from Shoshone Lake to Lewis Lake and then continue down to the confluence with the Snake River.

    NFBTFTW: It’s 15.4 miles almost due south from where the Lewis River starts at Shoshone Lake to the south boundary of YNP.

    PIBTHOB:
    I think hoB is the key to the solve. Forrest said there are many places in the Rocky Mountains where WWWH but there is only one hoB.

    In North America Grizzly bears are referred to as “Brown bears”. The primary habitat of Brown bears is from the southern border of Yellowstone north into Montana. Here’s the map: https://geology.com/stories/13/bear-areas/
    There’s a much smaller map on the Wikipedia Grizzly bear page. The important part is the dot that covers most of Yellowstone.

    I think SB 253 with the picture of the grizzlies was a hint. Here’s a quote from the SB: “Sometimes there were as many as 20 grizzlies scavenging at one time and black bears would not dare come around”. Maybe it’s a hint to distinguish between grizzlies (Brown bears) and Black bears. Brown and Black are not just adjectives used to describe the color of the bears; in fact many Black bears are actually brown in color. Brown or Black is the name of the particular species and, in my opinion, should be capitalized.

    If hoB is the home of grizzlies, then below the hoB would mean south of Yellowstone.

    As far as the “Put in” part, I’m still working on that. There appears to be a boat put-in just below the south entrance of Yellowstone and another one downriver at Flagg Ranch.

    It’s interesting to note that just downriver from Flagg Ranch are three creeks that come in on river left with the names QuarterCreek, Nickel Creek, and DimeCreek. Remember all the hints about nickels, dimes, and quarters?

    I have some other ideas about this, but that’s probably enough for now.

    Does anyone want to help out with this? Has anyone been to this area? I know there’s a lot of lodge pole pine.

    Maybe all of us NM/CO/MT searchers can work together to try to come up with a Wyoming solve. Many of us have been involved for at least a couple years. During that time we’ve paid attention to almost everything Forrest has said (Although I now wish I hadn’t paid attention to the pinyon nuts comment). Perhaps we can combine our knowledge and come up with something that works.

  • #2
    I like the fact you're 'back in the saddle' so to speak, someone needs to solve this otherwise we'll never get the answer!

    Some feedback, for what it's worth... (not much, just personal opinion...!)

    I was never convinced by geysers as WWWH. Mostly because they seem to be more hot than warm. (I've never seen one though, we don't have them in Kent!) It could be that I'm overthinking it though. But this answer doesn't seem to fit the 'halt' bit of the clue?

    Brown bears doesn't seem specific enough as a location. It could be so many places using that as the answer. I always thought WWWH might give a general vicinity, then the next clues get more specific to a small area. Though it doesn't need to work like that.

    I'm interested in working on Wyoming solves though, and maybe it helps that there are now a lot of people who are more likely to be open-minded about ideas?

    I totally agree that HOB seems key... Has anyone got a good HOB for Wyoming? I haven't seen one that stands out. I wondered if it was something to do with Barnum Brown, or Roland W Brown who discovered fossil plants in Wyoming. But with that line of thought I was just trying to fit the 'treasures old and new' to this state. The Colorado gold rush towns seemed to fit so well with that line, but clearly I need to scratch that! So what are the 'old treasures' in Wyoming?

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by tootingjo View Post
      I totally agree that HOB seems key... Has anyone got a good HOB for Wyoming? I haven't seen one that stands out. I wondered if it was something to do with Barnum Brown, or Roland W Brown who discovered fossil plants in Wyoming. But with that line of thought I was just trying to fit the 'treasures old and new' to this state. The Colorado gold rush towns seemed to fit so well with that line, but clearly I need to scratch that! So what are the 'old treasures' in Wyoming?
      I've always figured that HoB is probably a two step process: the hometown/area of an actual person named Brown that has a name that can be translated into something in the natural world, likely as a pun. In could also be a distinctive name that matches the name of given to a geographic feature like a mountain or river. My very first idea, within 15 minutes of reading the poem, was Bad, Bad Leroy Brown's home being the South side of Chicago. That led me to Chicago peak near Ouray but I quickly gave that up despite there being a Savage Creek below it and a good hint of riches old and new.

      What I eventually came up with was The Vale of the White Horse, from the book Tom Brown's Schooldays. This translates to a vein of white rock embedded in a different rock, per an old mining definition. Tuff Cliff in Yellowstone meets this definition. I know lots of people have looked there, but I don't think anyone thought it was HoB, but rather the blaze. The one I found, and I still think has a lot of potential, was along the Beartooth Highway (my WWWH) near Crazy Creek Falls. I talked about it in the HoB thread last week. Here's a link if you want to check out everyone's ideas again:

      https://www.hintofriches.com/forum/t...t-was-your-hob

      Comment


      • #4
        Macahol, I once had a hoB related to the Vale of White Horse. The schoolhouse from Fenn's story correlated with the Tom Brown Schoolhouse. We know the chest was not in NM, but look at this Vale of White Horse knock-off (36.041470, -106.175583). It's uncanny how nature formed this, yet it did. It's more a unicorn than horse, but close enough. And it's technically on "Cerro Roman" mtn. The Gypsies did a circle dance called the Roma Oro. Which translates to Roman Mtn. Coincidences are everywhere if you look hard enough.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Redneck Girl View Post
          Since I no longer have to defend my NM solve, I’m free to come up with ideas for Wyoming. Maybe someone could look at this and tell me if I’m on the right track.

          PIBTHOB:
          I think hoB is the key to the solve. Forrest said there are many places in the Rocky Mountains where WWWH but there is only one hoB.
          RG,

          I would caution to pay close attention to Forrest Fenn quotes. If they are missing part of the original quote, they can mislead. Often these quotes are answers to questions that have been asked of Fenn. He is very deliberate how he answers questions, and the context of the question may also be important. The notion of only one home of Brown is from this quote at Mysterious Writings. I have underlined three words of importance in Fenn's response to the question.

          FF, you say “There are many places in the Rocky Mountains where warm waters halt.” My question- Is there more than 1 home of Brown? Thanks, Jill

          No Jill, there is only one home of Brown in my poem. f

          Link to Reference

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Macahol View Post

            I've always figured that HoB is probably a two step process: the hometown/area of an actual person named Brown that has a name that can be translated into something in the natural world, likely as a pun.

            https://www.hintofriches.com/forum/t...t-was-your-hob
            I like this idea. It reminds me of the people getting to Providence from hoB. I suppose there are probably lots of famous Browns. Was Charlie Brown's home Peanuts...? Or Capability Brown's home gardens...? (that one might be too British) or Tom Brown is an interesting one, with the Vale of the White Horse. Hmm, something to think about.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Indy View Post
              Macahol, I once had a hoB related to the Vale of White Horse. The schoolhouse from Fenn's story correlated with the Tom Brown Schoolhouse. We know the chest was not in NM, but look at this Vale of White Horse knock-off (36.041470, -106.175583). It's uncanny how nature formed this, yet it did. It's more a unicorn than horse, but close enough. And it's technically on "Cerro Roman" mtn. The Gypsies did a circle dance called the Roma Oro. Which translates to Roman Mtn. Coincidences are everywhere if you look hard enough.
              That does look like a ghost unicorn.

              One thing I like about Tom Brown's schooldays is how well it lines up with Forrest's own schooldays. When Smell the Sunshine came out with his video about Catcher in the Rye and people noted the similarities to Forrest's life, my thought was that Tom Brown was the better analogy. The headmaster, Dr. Arnold, was a mentor in the same way as Marvin Fenn. Tom was always getting caned early on and he was once caught at his favorite, secret fishing hole. A lot of the soul searching Forrest did in My War For Me matches Tom's thoughts at the end of the novel.

              You're right about all of those coincidences that seemingly meant something but only yielded loose ends. Those references to Romberg - both the Stout Hearted Men song and Forrest tripping and falling for no reason (as in the Romberg test) led me to wonder what the hint was. Evidently it must have a reference to a Gypsy (Roma) Mt., and I found the one near Kismet Peak and wondered if and how it fit into the solve, but never made it work. I ultimately figured gypsy = gypsum in the chase.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by tootingjo View Post
                I like the fact you're 'back in the saddle' so to speak, someone needs to solve this otherwise we'll never get the answer!

                Some feedback, for what it's worth... (not much, just personal opinion...!)

                I was never convinced by geysers as WWWH. Mostly because they seem to be more hot than warm. (I've never seen one though, we don't have them in Kent!) It could be that I'm overthinking it though. But this answer doesn't seem to fit the 'halt' bit of the clue?

                Brown bears doesn't seem specific enough as a location. It could be so many places using that as the answer. I always thought WWWH might give a general vicinity, then the next clues get more specific to a small area. Though it doesn't need to work like that.

                I'm interested in working on Wyoming solves though, and maybe it helps that there are now a lot of people who are more likely to be open-minded about ideas?

                I totally agree that HOB seems key... Has anyone got a good HOB for Wyoming? I haven't seen one that stands out. I wondered if it was something to do with Barnum Brown, or Roland W Brown who discovered fossil plants in Wyoming. But with that line of thought I was just trying to fit the 'treasures old and new' to this state. The Colorado gold rush towns seemed to fit so well with that line, but clearly I need to scratch that! So what are the 'old treasures' in Wyoming?
                Thanks for reading my post.
                Even when I was searching in NM, I thought hoB might mean grizzly bears. In fact, that was one of the things that made me doubt my NM solve.


                Here’s a link to hoB quotes on MW:
                http://mysteriouswritings.com/top-fo...home-of-brown/

                I found this one from 2012 Forest gets mail on Dal’s site to be particularly interesting:

                Mail: I had a chance to scoot down the Madison this evening. Its a beautiful river. I’ve never seen it before. Next I’ll have to be concerned about a blaze but first things first. The “home of Brown” is first. I walked some nice river tonight and saw some beautiful flywater. Will check out more tomorrow.
                Forrest’s response: I am afraid you will figure the clues and find the chest. That’s why I am trying to guide you to where the grizzlies hide near Brown’s house and wait for treasure hunters. It was a hard winter for them and they are really hungry.

                I know he was being humorous with his answer, but many a truth is spoken in jest. Maybe it was a hint that grizzlies were the hoB.

                Here’s another:
                From MW 7/2/2014
                Do you think that someone who is sure about the location of the home of Brown could reverse-engineer where warm waters halt? ~Ben Raylor
                Thanks for the question Ben.
                If you are sure about the location of home of Brown why are you concerned about where warm waters halt? But to answer your question, sure you could and a few searchers might throw in some gas money for a percentage of the take. Good luck.f


                We know that WWWH is along a road because he told us that you start by getting in your car and driving to WWWH. His answer to Ben about gas money seems to imply that you can also drive from WWWH to below the hoB. From what I can tell, there aren’t too many roads in YNP. The main one is Hwy 191. I took hoB to be grizzly bears and tried to reverse engineer to get WWWH. That meant I was looking for a road that came out through the south end of the park.

                I don’t think hoB is a structure. As far as a person's name, there are so many people named Brown how would you know which one to pick? Maybe if you knew a lot about Forrest it would help narrow it down. If it's not a structure or a person, then that doesn’t leave many options. I always thought Brown trout was a possibility but there are a lot of places that could be considered the home of Brown trout.

                If hoB is grizzly bears in YNP, then below the hoB could be anywhere below the southern border of the park. I can understand your objection to the fact that this covers a large area. That’s why you need to pick the correct WWWH.

                As far as WWWH, the only thing I know for sure is that it wasn’t the fishing regulations in NM (I’d say LOL but I’m still not ready to laugh about that). I think there are many places in YNP that would qualify, just like Forest said there are many places in the Rocky Mtns where WWH. The reason I picked Shoshone geyser basin was because the drainage headed south out of the park and exited the park into Wyoming. I was trying to come up with a solve that wasn’t in a National Park (maybe I’m wrong about that and the treasure was in YNP). WWWH could also be where the water comes out of Lewis Lake or even Lewis Falls (for those who like WWWH to be a waterfall). It is interesting that the distance from the headwaters of the Lewis River at Lewis Lake to the South boundary of the Park along Hwy 191 is exactly 10 miles (TFTW).

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Longfellow View Post

                  RG,

                  I would caution to pay close attention to Forrest Fenn quotes. If they are missing part of the original quote, they can mislead. Often these quotes are answers to questions that have been asked of Fenn. He is very deliberate how he answers questions, and the context of the question may also be important. The notion of only one home of Brown is from this quote at Mysterious Writings. I have underlined three words of importance in Fenn's response to the question.

                  FF, you say “There are many places in the Rocky Mountains where warm waters halt.” My question- Is there more than 1 home of Brown? Thanks, Jill

                  No Jill, there is only one home of Brown in my poem. f

                  Link to Reference
                  Thanks Longfellow. You are correct. His answer doesn't say there is only one hoB, just that there is only one hoB in the poem. Of course it doesn't rule out the possibility that there is only one hoB.

                  Since Jill mentions both hoB and WWWH, his answer brings up another question: Could there be more than one WWWH in the poem?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Redneck Girl View Post

                    Thanks Longfellow. You are correct. His answer doesn't say there is only one hoB, just that there is only one hoB in the poem. Of course it doesn't rule out the possibility that there is only one hoB.

                    Since Jill mentions both hoB and WWWH, his answer brings up another question: Could there be more than one WWWH in the poem?
                    Could be literal, figurative, metaphorical or all three at once or more. Is there an Alan Simpson and or Dal Nietzel thread somewhere? I don't think those guys get enough crediit. Just thinking frankly. If Fenn is an architect who is the builder, electrician (loads), plumber (water, HoBrown hehe), carpenter (wood) etcetera? Am I the only one thinking theses things?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Redneck Girl View Post

                      Thanks Longfellow. You are correct. His answer doesn't say there is only one hoB, just that there is only one hoB in the poem. Of course it doesn't rule out the possibility that there is only one hoB.

                      Since Jill mentions both hoB and WWWH, his answer brings up another question: Could there be more than one WWWH in the poem?
                      I don't think there is more than one WWWH in the poem. Nor do I think there is more than one WWWH "location" in the physical world of this treasure hunt (BOTG). I can't put my hands on it right now, but I could have sworn I had read that Forrest had indicated to someone (I think Dal) that WWWH is one specific location. If Zapster is reading this, I bet he could come up with it. That guy is like a Chase content/quote encyclopedia, but if I run across it, I'll pass that along to you.

                      Notwithstanding the above, what I will suggest is that it is significant that his poem could have said "...where warm water halts," but instead he said "...where warm waters halt." He is using the plural form of the word. First thing to do is decide if his is using it as a noun, a verb, or both at the same time. Since he chose to use the plural form of the word, I would wager that while WWWH may be a single location or feature, it is quite likely characterized by more than a singular instance of, or reference to, water. As atticusfinch315 points out, they might all be literal, all figurative, or some combination thereof.
                      Last edited by Longfellow; 07-30-2020, 04:47 PM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Here's what I was looking for: https://dalneitzel.com/2013/12/28/th...#comment-29511

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Longfellow View Post
                          Good find Longfellow! I was not aware of that comment from Dal. Coming form Dal it is second hand, but I have no reason not to believe him. I agree that it makes more sense if WWWH is a specific location. I also agree that waters being plural is a hint. Just to let you know - I'm probably one of the least qualified searchers to try to figure out WWWH since I thought it was the fishing regulations in NM.

                          As I pointed out above in my reply to tootingjo, I think there are hints that hoB could be grizzly bears. Dal said the searcher asked if all of Yellowstone could be considered WWWH and Forest said no. That doesn't mean that all of Yellowstone couldn't be the hoB.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Redneck Girl View Post

                            As I pointed out above in my reply to tootingjo, I think there are hints that hoB could be grizzly bears. Dal said the searcher asked if all of Yellowstone could be considered WWWH and Forest said no. That doesn't mean that all of Yellowstone couldn't be the hoB.
                            I can't disagree with that. With regard to grizzly bears as home of Brown, there will need to be some justification for Fenn's capitalization of Brown. I'm guessing it is somehow related to a proper noun (a named person, place, or thing), or a reference thereof.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Macahol View Post

                              I've always figured that HoB is probably a two step process: the hometown/area of an actual person named Brown that has a name that can be translated into something in the natural world, likely as a pun. In could also be a distinctive name that matches the name of given to a geographic feature like a mountain or river. My very first idea, within 15 minutes of reading the poem, was Bad, Bad Leroy Brown's home being the South side of Chicago. That led me to Chicago peak near Ouray but I quickly gave that up despite there being a Savage Creek below it and a good hint of riches old and new.

                              What I eventually came up with was The Vale of the White Horse, from the book Tom Brown's Schooldays. This translates to a vein of white rock embedded in a different rock, per an old mining definition. Tuff Cliff in Yellowstone meets this definition. I know lots of people have looked there, but I don't think anyone thought it was HoB, but rather the blaze. The one I found, and I still think has a lot of potential, was along the Beartooth Highway (my WWWH) near Crazy Creek Falls. I talked about it in the HoB thread last week. Here's a link if you want to check out everyone's ideas again:

                              https://www.hintofriches.com/forum/t...t-was-your-hob
                              Here's the list I compiled of possible hoBs:
                              Providence
                              Brownsville
                              Brown’s Landing
                              Brown is Forrest’s nickname of a canyon
                              Bromine
                              A ranger cabin
                              Below El Vado Reservoir where the largest Brown trout in NM was caught
                              The polo grounds
                              Rhode Island
                              Wildlife Tree
                              Monastery garden
                              Tom Brown’s home (the vale of the white horse)
                              The clay source for brown ware pottery
                              Paul Bunyun’s boot
                              Black Rock Springs. John Dunn’s home with the kayak put-in below it
                              John Dunn Bridge
                              Eagle Nest Lake
                              A bear shape with only one eye on GE
                              His father’s cow’s stall

                              Please note that I started the hoB thread before the announcement that the treasure was in Wyoming. As a result, most hoBs on the list are places in NM. Now that we know the treasure was in Wyoming maybe I should start this thread over again. I know my hoB is no longer the monastery garden.

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