Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

1413/Home/Brown/Pie Discussion

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • 1413/Home/Brown/Pie Discussion

    I'm posting just for fun because I'm still working this thing, so if you want to play along and have fun, keep reading and maybe some of us can work out the ugly twin of the one true solve! How's that for optimism. Now that it's over, I'm having fun going through ideas good and ill.

    Like most everyone else, I went through a lot of changes in my thinking on home of Brown. Prior to the chase ending, I was actively exploring the angle on "Br." (hair color) on his childhood ID being a solid capitalized "Brown" in the book, rightly or wrongly (but clearly wrongly because no gold for me but the gold I make in my mind).

    Forrest spent a lot of time pinging his childhood address in each of the three books. It's more subtle in the first book, but by the second book his childhood home address is the only red caption below a photo in that entire book. By the time we get to the third book, it's just me scratching my head going "Why will he not let go of his childhood home? Why does he keep giving us the address to where a house no longer exists and is not even in the search states?" I settled on "1413 North" being somewhat of a bang on hint for home of Brown. I figured it was the squares just north of the Dam on the Madison, right by Cabin Creek, a Cabin is also a home of Brown. A cabin is also no place for biddies, because they live in brick houses and think they are better than everyone else.

    I also encountered the pie/pi problem. Just too much pineapple/pie in that book, so that sent me looking for circles in the book, which was useful as any other rabbit hole my mind manufactured on the path to perfect failure. The circle hunt did help me find Skippy circling Hebgen "for maximum effect and to everyone's bewilderment." I figured that Hebgen could be where warm waters halt, for a bunch of stupid reasons that will be too long to list here.

    But finally I started thinking about Pi. Pi is 3.141. If you reverse that like George Washington on the dollar bill, you end up with 1413 again. It's possible that this is just a coincidence, but then why all the pie all over the place.

    Also, that sketch with the kids playing marbles. There are 3 marbles. There are two people pointing. There is one shooter. There are four boys. 3.14. It's so funny how the mind can grab these things and complicate them or contort them like this.

    What's a much better home of Brown? I keep scratching my head trying to find a really cool one that will just jump out and shock you with its elegance and simplicity. What's the best, most elegant home of Brown you've seen in the post-find chatter?

    Remember how he talks about his hair changing color and how he could just dye it and yadda yadda in the in between section--between Preface and "Important Literature" where he talks about Eric Sloane? After about 407 readings of the book, because I'm really dense, I sort of thought that was him hinting to pay attention to his hair color.

    I feel like the Brown Trout theory was always a Brown Herring. I fell down that rabbit hole too. Learned all about places where Brown Trout spawn and their introduction into certain bodies of water historically, but then I remembered that history isn't what we needed to be learning about and that the book was one third of his "excellent research materials" list. (the other two thirds being the poem, and Google Earth/a good map.) So I bought the only map the book talks about. The one with 1413 in the Canyon Down.

    I had a very hard time walking the line between wanting to learn everything in the relevant universe and remembering that the book contains the hints to solve the clues in the poem.

    What did everyone else make out of his childhood address, his hair color "Br.", and all the pie all over the place? Pie is also all over the other books too. I figured look for clusters that are repeating and appear across all three books.

    With all my best thinking and imagination, I don't think I'm capable of solving this but I'm still trying to build the ugly twin of what the correct solve might actually be. In the court document, Forrest states that the finder used the hints in the book to solve the poem. It'd be really fun if the finder, anonymously through Forrest, would release just one hint a month and let us play with it on our own or as a group. That way, we could slowly play along. Clearly Forrest and the Finder are the smart kids in class and I'm in the corner wearing a dunce cap, praying for Ds. I wish the finder could know how interested I still am in figuring out a way through this maze. If I knew just one of the hints in the book, I'd probably be entertained for a year!

    That's what it always felt like to me, a labyrinth, a maze. It even included the two ways you solve a maze "A ball of string" and "chalk" (the memories). And it even had a bull right in it. I thought that was incredibly clever of Forrest. There's no way he didn't know myths and didn't draw on them.

    I had no idea what to do with Thor though. Everything I tried felt contorted so I just put him on a shelf in the back of my mind where he gathered dust. Poor Thor. The correct solution probably accounts for Thor somehow, but I was not clever enough to even figure out remotely what Thor could possibly stand for or hint toward. I've seen the theories where Thor is a Marvel character and that Forrest uses the word "hulk/ing" but the problem I always felt with those theories that went way too far is that what the heck do you do with it? You got Marvel and some characters, what's the next step? Because I could never see how they connected to the real world, on a map. I've seen people try, but those explanations never make me go "I totally see what you're saying." The opposite effect happens. I just want to ask "So, how do you convert comic book characters into a locating mechanism on a map?"

  • #2
    There are no guarantees these are correct, but these are my thoughts.

    The Home of Brown may be Trout Lake in Wyoming at GPS coordinates 44.900516, -110.129562. The shape of the lake looks a bit like the center of the jet's afterburner in the drawing on page 99 of TTOTC. However, that may simply be my imagination.

    'Marvel' could well be the word that is key, or the word that will help you more than others - particularly if it refers to Marvel characters. Try using The Thunderer around 44.903286, -110.057313 to convert a comic book character into a location. That may be no place for the meek.

    Next, try using the Eye of the Needle somewhere around 44.865034, -110.005156 to convert another Marvel character, The Needle, into a location. You may find the shape of the arch named 'The Eye of the Needle' resembles the shape of the tablet or headstone in the drawing on page 95 of TTOTC.

    In my opinion, there are ultimately only two confirmers for the correct hiding place of the treasure chest formerly known as Indulgence. One is the treasure chest itself, which has moved and no longer confirms the final location. The other is Forrest, who may or may not be in a position to confirm the hiding place.

    Good luck with your research.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by YNP Solve View Post
      There are no guarantees these are correct, but these are my thoughts.

      The Home of Brown may be Trout Lake in Wyoming at GPS coordinates 44.900516, -110.129562. The shape of the lake looks a bit like the center of the jet's afterburner in the drawing on page 99 of TTOTC. However, that may simply be my imagination.

      'Marvel' could well be the word that is key, or the word that will help you more than others - particularly if it refers to Marvel characters. Try using The Thunderer around 44.903286, -110.057313 to convert a comic book character into a location. That may be no place for the meek.

      Next, try using the Eye of the Needle somewhere around 44.865034, -110.005156 to convert another Marvel character, The Needle, into a location. You may find the shape of the arch named 'The Eye of the Needle' resembles the shape of the tablet or headstone in the drawing on page 95 of TTOTC.

      In my opinion, there are ultimately only two confirmers for the correct hiding place of the treasure chest formerly known as Indulgence. One is the treasure chest itself, which has moved and no longer confirms the final location. The other is Forrest, who may or may not be in a position to confirm the hiding place.

      Good luck with your research.
      I'm not sure how I can convert Thor into "The Thunderer" or how "The Needle" enters into the picture. Is there some needle I missed in TTOTC? See what I mean? About how we can randomly grab hold of ideas that definitely seem not far but too far removed from the poem and the book.? I found myself doing this a lot early into my searching adventures.

      As a kid, I was a huge Marvel Comics fan, but why stop with Thor and The Needle? Why not include all of the entire universe to create an insane grab bag of possible further rabbit holes? Spider Man is the most well known Marvel character, or maybe now with the movies he's tied with Wolverine or Iron Man. Why no spider story?

      Thanks for the well wishes on my continued quest to create something while I await option three, the one you didn't list: The Finder can tell us the solution and the final location. That's pretty much the only option we have left since Forrest said he's out and tagged the finder as potentially the only one from to whom we could expect to hear answers, if ever.

      If home of Brown has anything to do with trout, I would laugh because what about where trout live can we glean from TTOTC? We know they're on the Madison. We further know from the images on pages 122-123 that the largest number of the largest trout were caught on Lake Hebgen, based on comparing the photos on those pages. Maybe Hebgen was both WWWH and hoB. Seems a little too fishy to me.

      Comment


      • #4
        You're right about the finder being able to provide the solution, but I don't know how to identify who the true finder is. I think Kpro counted over 30 persons claiming to be the finder. Good luck trying to sort out the true finder(s) from the pretenders.

        Comment


        • #5
          Maybe the needle was the funny part....

          Oh look.....you found the Needle In The Haystack.

          I for one am glad there was no spider story. I am terrified of spiders! I have too many stories on that subject.

          Comment


          • #6
            I never would have noticed that Forrest's childhood address was pi backwards. I was never sure what do with all of the pie references myself. I couldn't find a place for 3.14 in my solve and eventually settled on pie having something to do with iron as there is an etymological connection.

            My HoB, was derived from a book called Tom Brown's Schooldays, whose title character from a town called Vale of the White Horse. I then translated "horse" to the old timey mining term for a block of rock completely separated from the surrounding rock. When I found such a rock formation in my search area right about where Forrest seemed to hint it should be vis-a-vis WWWH, it became the cornerstone of my solve. Lots of hints throughout the books seemed to be confimers for me. I attached a picture of my actual HoB in case your wondering.

            I found two potential applications for Thor. 1) Longfellow's Challenge of Thor, which features the line "meekness is weakness here in the northland". This would mean that no place for the meek meant heading north from the vantage point in the attached picture. 2) Thor dies at the battle of Ragnarok. If you google Ragnarok, it makes for a pretty good end is ever drawing nigh. Like my HoB, I though Ragnarok could be broken down to a viable rock formation if you parse it into its 3 syllables.
            Attached Files

            Comment


            • #7
              Using mostly logic my home of Brown was Artists Point (Yellowstone). With a little more imagination it was more of a collective area, from Mammoth to Bunsen Peak.. but it may describe a key as well. Not that it's of interest or worth 2 bits..
              Last edited by Castellaw1685; 07-13-2020, 09:27 AM.
              Miles up in the air he flew, He just murmured, Toodle-oo!

              Comment


              • #8
                I think the most important part of Brown is that she/he/it/they only has/have one name in the poem. It’s not there, alone, merely to increase the possibilities.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Playing on your pi theme, pineapple pies and such, you've missed that his childhood address actually contains pi backwards twice. 1413 *N*orth *M*ain, N being the 14th letter, M the 13th. :-)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Zapster View Post
                    Playing on your pi theme, pineapple pies and such, you've missed that his childhood address actually contains pi backwards twice. 1413 *N*orth *M*ain, N being the 14th letter, M the 13th. :-)
                    Well done.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Castellaw1685 View Post
                      Using mostly logic my home of Brown was Artists Point (Yellowstone). With a little more imagination it was more of a collective area, from Mammoth to Bunsen Peak.. but it may describe a key as well. Not that it's of interest or worth 2 bits..
                      I went down the people named Brown in the west rabbit hole. The reason it wouldn't work for me personally was because where Grafton painted isn't a home. That's why I was exploring the homes/houses in the book itself. I only got into trouble building solves when I reached too far out from the memoir itself.

                      If the hints are in the book, as Fenn said, to solve the poem, I would sometimes wonder why I was up reading obscure newspaper articles from 1910 at 2 in the morning on people named Brown. But I was definitely down those rabbit holes until surfacing for air and shaking them off like fleas.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by JHSharp View Post
                        I think the most important part of Brown is that she/he/it/they only has/have one name in the poem. It’s not there, alone, merely to increase the possibilities.
                        I do not understand. Could you please clarify for me? I don't think it's a person at all. I think it's his hair color, as that's a capital B Brown in the book and it has his childhood home address on that ID in the book.

                        If you think Brown is a person, may I politely ask how one would decide which of the people's home with the last name Brown should we have been looking at? And what would be our mark or star to determine that this Brown was the correct one vs every other thing named Brown in the Rockies? What would the process for sorting Browns by priority be in that scenario? I'm just curious about process. Because I'm certain it can't be a randomizer. "Step right up. Pick a Brown, any Brown!"

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Zapster View Post
                          Playing on your pi theme, pineapple pies and such, you've missed that his childhood address actually contains pi backwards twice. 1413 *N*orth *M*ain, N being the 14th letter, M the 13th. :-)
                          I don't think I would have ever got this 1413 connection. By your reasoning, if 14 is N and 13 is M, then you could also say that it contains NM twice. Doesn't NM stand for New Mexico? Thank you for pointing this out!!!
                          Last edited by Redneck Girl; 07-14-2020, 08:14 AM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            June Did Everything Right Idk about the Marvel bit, but you’re right on the money with the rest, IMO.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              My hoBs went something like,
                              1. Coffin - little, brown and company published both jd salinger and eric sloane (just one book of sloans's i think) Little's middle name was coffin of all things. A brown final home.
                              2. Brown the color might be at home on an artists palette - which took me to a geyser in yellowstone called palette that oozes brown if i remember correctly.
                              3. Brown the color is a mixture of other colors, and i took the home bit to mean 'sits between', giving a place somewhere between two color-named mountains.
                              4. You capitalize at the start of a sentence. When you start a sentence, you're going behind bars, typically called iron bars. So i had iron or fe somewhere in there, and of course a cooking hob can be cast-iron too.
                              5. Someone on here had a nice periodic table solution where 'I' and 'in' occurred below 'B' and 'Br'.

                              That's as many as i can remember for now!

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X