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Zapster's first 4 clues

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  • Zapster's first 4 clues

    I've shared my first 3 clues before, so here I'll summarize and add my 4th. My WWWH is where the Gallatin River exits Yellowstone National Park at its northwest corner. Gallatin Canyon formally begins at that point. The general idea behind “where warm waters halt” was simply the totality of Yellowstone: the greatest concentration of geysers in the world (and something a child would know). Geyser water goes up, halts briefly at the top, and then comes back down and halts on the ground. Geysers also halt temporally between eruptions, and you might also say they halt passersby when
    they’re going off. Lots of halting.

    But it is the geographic interpretation of halting that leads to my starting point. All of YNP is not an actionable destination, and Forrest was clear that WWWH was not a broad area but a precise spot. YNP “halts” at the park boundary. (I briefly considered the caldera boundary, but it isn't as precise the Park border.) I think this is the reason for the triple mention of Border’s (sic on that apostrophe!), Borders and “borderline biddies” in the TTOTC chapter “Important Literature.” I believe it’s also why he mentions National Geographic on five separate occasions in TFTW: pages 96, 123, 162 (twice + once for the photo caption) and 164. (A National Geographic book also appears at the bottom left corner of a picture in SB 113). I think the intended hint here is the iconic rectangular yellow border around every National Geographic magazine: Yellow(stone) border.

    Still, the park border is long – hundreds of miles. You need a precise starting point along that boundary, and that’s what the keyword in the first stanza – Gallatin – provides. Actually, I think of it as a modified acrostic keyphrase using eight consecutive words, reminiscent of what Kit Williams did with Masquerade:

    As I have gone alonein there,
    And with my treasures bold


    GAL-one-I-T-AN, W. MT

    Replace the “one” with a numeral 1 (which is indistinguishable from a lower case L in TTOTC book font) and you’ve got Gallitan, W(est) Montana. Yes, misspelled, but a Gallatin homophone. (I think if spelled more precisely it would have been solved too quickly.) The map that Forrest and Donnie burned on their Lewis & Clark adventure was the Gallatin National Forest West map. There is a tiny bit of backup confirmation later in the poem:

    So why is it that I must go and leave my trove… (Gal., MT)

    If there is still some skepticism, consider a literal interpretation of “a word that is key.” You’ve probably seen this before, but the shape of Gallatin County is interesting:

    Click image for larger version  Name:	Montana_key.jpg Views:	0 Size:	60.1 KB ID:	171608

    Lots of hints for Gallatin or Gallatin Canyon can be found scattered in all three memoirs, the Scrapbooks, and even in Mysterious Writings Q&A's. (If people care, I can share some of the better ones.) Most of you probably are familiar with Redford's movie A River Runs Through It, and some of you may be aware that Gallatin Canyon was the shooting site for most of the flyfishing scenes -- not the Blackfoot River. Recall one of the lessons learned at the end of the Lewis & Clark chapter: "Movies lie to you."

    Anyway, once you’re focused on that canyon, you’ll discover that Forrest appears to have dropped hints
    for every named geographic feature in the general vicinity:

    “Smell the sunshine” = Sunshine Point
    Many pictures of and mentions of teepees = Tepee Creek
    Endless pictures and mentions of buffaloes and buffalo horns = Buffalo Horn Creek
    Flint arrowheads and Flint Fyke in TFTW page 25 = Flints Creek
    Wilson Hurley, Valerie Plame Wilson, Ronald Wilson Reagan = Wilson Draw (Wilson Draw-ings, even)
    Dr. Taylor Floyd (Forrest’s surgeon), SB 54 Birch & Taylor token, SB 103 Taylor Swift, SB 163: Taylor Clark, TFTW pg. 238: Mount Taylor: Taylor Fork
    Rubber-wheeled wagon in Gypsy Magic = rubber-wheeled wagon outside Covered Wagon Ranch
    Scrapbook 49 about spices = Cinnamon Creek and Sage Creek
    The illustration of kids pointing at marbles in TTOTC = Marble Point

    Hints can also be found for Pulpit Rock, Big Sky, Burnt Top, Crown Butte and others, but no need to belabor the point.

    Moving on to the 3rd clue: “Not far, but too far to walk.”

    I've been posting for years that I think this clue is the bottleneck -- the puzzle that searchers fail to solve because they think it is some vague distance one must travel down the canyon while looking for a home of Brown. (Or worse: they think it's 10 miles because that figure was mentioned in the preface of TFTW). And some don’t think it’s a clue at all – that hoB is the 3rd clue. But in my opinion, that’s not what Forrest is doing here. I believe that line is a geographic logic puzzle. First, recall Forrest’s mention of Hemingway’s novel For Whom the Bell Tolls in TTOTC. Continuing on the acrostic theme, compare the initial five letters of the novel with “but too far to walk.” It’s an interesting coincidence: same letters, but in a different order. Now take a look at the first six creeks that drain into the Gallatin as you head downstream through Gallatin Canyon:

    Tepee Creek, Sage Creek, Taylor Fork, Wilson Draw, Flints Creek, and Buffalo Horn Creek

    Now do a little re-ordering:

    But Too Far To Walk

    Bell Tolls For The Whom

    Buffalo, Taylor, Flints, Tepee, Wilson

    Finally, recall Scrapbook 61:

    “It seems logical to me that a deep thinking treasure searcher could use logic to determine an important clue to the location of the treasure.”

    The basic logic operators are AND, OR and NOT, and our line starts with one of them. I think this logic puzzle is a clue of exclusion. Just as the Hemingway storyline that Forrest described in TTOTC does NOT belong to For Whom the Bell Tolls (it’s A Farewell to Arms), what the poem line is saying is that it’s:

    NOT: Far But Too Far To Walk

    NOT: Flints, Buffalo, Taylor Fork, Tepee, Wilson

    It’s the creek of omission: Sage. Does the poem provide some confirmation? Seems so:

    If you’ve been wise… (past tense – as in a prior clue)

    Finally, go back to the first four words of the poem and look at every 3rd letter, starting with the second:

    AS I HAVE GONE

    Another good hint for this clue was in TTOTC. Look at the last six words on page 70:

    “… through the dumb barbed wire fence.”

    NOT: through the [dumb] barbed wire fence
    NOT: Tepee Taylor [dumb] Buffalo Wilson Flints

    And what is not dumb? Smart. Sage.

    Could Forrest have even hinted at all six creeks in his final treasure-found post with the three pictures? Look at the caption for the middle picture (“me in the middle”):

    “The bracelet on my arm was wet when found. The silver tarnished black.”

    First letters of last six words.

    My home of Brown was Tepee Creek (tepee = a home of Brown people), but that’s the unimportant half of the clue. What matters is the “Put in below” part. If you are at WWWH and heading down Gallatin Canyon, the very first place you can put in below Tepee Creek that is *also* a literal river put-in is on the right side of the highway shortly after the road crosses over the Gallatin:

    Click image for larger version  Name:	Putin_Spot.jpg Views:	0 Size:	219.7 KB ID:	171609
    Recall the Amos ‘n’ Andy quote from TTOTC (which Forrest also repeated in SB 232): “Don’t make the alligator mad until you’ve crossed the river.” Notice that alligator contains the letters of Gallatin scrambled except for the N, and maybe Forrest hinted at that missing N by failing to include the second apostrophe of Amos ‘n’ Andy.

    The closest creek to this location is Sage Creek, about 1000 feet further down river. There is a very good geographic reason you would park here. Anyone want to hazard a guess?

    Finally (for now), this whole upper section of Gallatin Canyon has a name: Middle Basin. Me in the Middle.
    Last edited by Zapster; 06-30-2020, 03:16 PM. Reason: Fixing some formatting

  • #2
    I kinda like this one. Sentimental reasons. An earlier solve had me camping on some Tepee-named dirt road there.

    Comment


    • #3
      Nice solve! I see a lot of deep thinking and logic being applied.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by thehomeofBrown.com View Post
        Nice solve! I see a lot of deep thinking and logic being applied.
        Thanks! I was to make a 9th or 10th (have lost track) BOTG trip on June 9, but you know how that got derailed. ;-) But I decided to go through with trying my September 2019 final solution anyway so I can put it to rest. I don't think we're going to be told the solution by the finder in the near future, but I don't need him for that confirmation.

        Comment


        • #5
          “There is a very good geographic reason you would park here. Anyone want to hazard a guess?”

          Its the closest parking location to the bridge?

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by TroyE View Post
            “There is a very good geographic reason you would park here. Anyone want to hazard a guess?”

            Its the closest parking location to the bridge?
            Well, that's certainly true, TroyE. ;-) But I'm looking for the specific reason why that's particularly advantageous to the searcher.

            Comment


            • #7
              Meek line means get out your vehicle. No paddle, means don’t don’t go toward Sage Creek. Heavy Loads and Water High means go toward the bridge.

              Comment


              • #8
                You're paddle interpretation was the same as mine: that "There'll be no paddle up your creek" meant do NOT go toward *your* creek (Sage), go the other way. But you are missing an element of "no place for the meek" that I assumed. Yes, you're on foot from this point, but what did the old biddies say Forrest couldn't do?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Zapster View Post
                  You're paddle interpretation was the same as mine: that "There'll be no paddle up your creek" meant do NOT go toward *your* creek (Sage), go the other way. But you are missing an element of "no place for the meek" that I assumed. Yes, you're on foot from this point, but what did the old biddies say Forrest couldn't do?
                  Cross the street

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Exactly. :-) But Forrest could cross the street any old time he wanted, couldn't he? And cars were whizzing every which way weren't they? (And on Gallatin Highway, a fair share of 18-wheelers as well!)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Good solve... definitely worth the read! Thanks for posting!
                      „It‘s almost impossible to carry the torch of truth through a crowd without singeing somebody‘s beard.“
                      G. C. Lichtenberg

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Zapster View Post
                        I've shared my first 3 clues before, so here I'll summarize and add my 4th. My WWWH is where the Gallatin River exits Yellowstone National Park at its northwest corner. Gallatin Canyon formally begins at that point. The general idea behind “where warm waters halt” was simply the totality of Yellowstone: the greatest concentration of geysers in the world (and something a child would know). Geyser water goes up, halts briefly at the top, and then comes back down and halts on the ground. Geysers also halt temporally between eruptions, and you might also say they halt passersby when
                        they’re going off. Lots of halting.

                        But it is the geographic interpretation of halting that leads to my starting point. All of YNP is not an actionable destination, and Forrest was clear that WWWH was not a broad area but a precise spot. YNP “halts” at the park boundary. (I briefly considered the caldera boundary, but it isn't as precise the Park border.) I think this is the reason for the triple mention of Border’s (sic on that apostrophe!), Borders and “borderline biddies” in the TTOTC chapter “Important Literature.” I believe it’s also why he mentions National Geographic on five separate occasions in TFTW: pages 96, 123, 162 (twice + once for the photo caption) and 164. (A National Geographic book also appears at the bottom left corner of a picture in SB 113). I think the intended hint here is the iconic rectangular yellow border around every National Geographic magazine: Yellow(stone) border.

                        Still, the park border is long – hundreds of miles. You need a precise starting point along that boundary, and that’s what the keyword in the first stanza – Gallatin – provides. Actually, I think of it as a modified acrostic keyphrase using eight consecutive words, reminiscent of what Kit Williams did with Masquerade:

                        As I have gone alonein there,
                        And with my treasures bold


                        GAL-one-I-T-AN, W. MT

                        Replace the “one” with a numeral 1 (which is indistinguishable from a lower case L in TTOTC book font) and you’ve got Gallitan, W(est) Montana. Yes, misspelled, but a Gallatin homophone. (I think if spelled more precisely it would have been solved too quickly.) The map that Forrest and Donnie burned on their Lewis & Clark adventure was the Gallatin National Forest West map. There is a tiny bit of backup confirmation later in the poem:

                        So why is it that I must go and leave my trove… (Gal., MT)

                        If there is still some skepticism, consider a literal interpretation of “a word that is key.” You’ve probably seen this before, but the shape of Gallatin County is interesting:

                        Click image for larger version Name:	Montana_key.jpg Views:	0 Size:	60.1 KB ID:	171608

                        Lots of hints for Gallatin or Gallatin Canyon can be found scattered in all three memoirs, the Scrapbooks, and even in Mysterious Writings Q&A's. (If people care, I can share some of the better ones.) Most of you probably are familiar with Redford's movie A River Runs Through It, and some of you may be aware that Gallatin Canyon was the shooting site for most of the flyfishing scenes -- not the Blackfoot River. Recall one of the lessons learned at the end of the Lewis & Clark chapter: "Movies lie to you."

                        Anyway, once you’re focused on that canyon, you’ll discover that Forrest appears to have dropped hints
                        for every named geographic feature in the general vicinity:

                        “Smell the sunshine” = Sunshine Point
                        Many pictures of and mentions of teepees = Tepee Creek
                        Endless pictures and mentions of buffaloes and buffalo horns = Buffalo Horn Creek
                        Flint arrowheads and Flint Fyke in TFTW page 25 = Flints Creek
                        Wilson Hurley, Valerie Plame Wilson, Ronald Wilson Reagan = Wilson Draw (Wilson Draw-ings, even)
                        Dr. Taylor Floyd (Forrest’s surgeon), SB 54 Birch & Taylor token, SB 103 Taylor Swift, SB 163: Taylor Clark, TFTW pg. 238: Mount Taylor: Taylor Fork
                        Rubber-wheeled wagon in Gypsy Magic = rubber-wheeled wagon outside Covered Wagon Ranch
                        Scrapbook 49 about spices = Cinnamon Creek and Sage Creek
                        The illustration of kids pointing at marbles in TTOTC = Marble Point

                        Hints can also be found for Pulpit Rock, Big Sky, Burnt Top, Crown Butte and others, but no need to belabor the point.

                        Moving on to the 3rd clue: “Not far, but too far to walk.”

                        I've been posting for years that I think this clue is the bottleneck -- the puzzle that searchers fail to solve because they think it is some vague distance one must travel down the canyon while looking for a home of Brown. (Or worse: they think it's 10 miles because that figure was mentioned in the preface of TFTW). And some don’t think it’s a clue at all – that hoB is the 3rd clue. But in my opinion, that’s not what Forrest is doing here. I believe that line is a geographic logic puzzle. First, recall Forrest’s mention of Hemingway’s novel For Whom the Bell Tolls in TTOTC. Continuing on the acrostic theme, compare the initial five letters of the novel with “but too far to walk.” It’s an interesting coincidence: same letters, but in a different order. Now take a look at the first six creeks that drain into the Gallatin as you head downstream through Gallatin Canyon:

                        Tepee Creek, Sage Creek, Taylor Fork, Wilson Draw, Flints Creek, and Buffalo Horn Creek

                        Now do a little re-ordering:

                        But Too Far To Walk

                        Bell Tolls For The Whom

                        Buffalo, Taylor, Flints, Tepee, Wilson

                        Finally, recall Scrapbook 61:

                        “It seems logical to me that a deep thinking treasure searcher could use logic to determine an important clue to the location of the treasure.”

                        The basic logic operators are AND, OR and NOT, and our line starts with one of them. I think this logic puzzle is a clue of exclusion. Just as the Hemingway storyline that Forrest described in TTOTC does NOT belong to For Whom the Bell Tolls (it’s A Farewell to Arms), what the poem line is saying is that it’s:

                        NOT: Far But Too Far To Walk

                        NOT: Flints, Buffalo, Taylor Fork, Tepee, Wilson

                        It’s the creek of omission: Sage. Does the poem provide some confirmation? Seems so:

                        If you’ve been wise… (past tense – as in a prior clue)

                        Finally, go back to the first four words of the poem and look at every 3rd letter, starting with the second:

                        AS I HAVE GONE

                        Another good hint for this clue was in TTOTC. Look at the last six words on page 70:

                        “… through the dumb barbed wire fence.”

                        NOT: through the [dumb] barbed wire fence
                        NOT: Tepee Taylor [dumb] Buffalo Wilson Flints

                        And what is not dumb? Smart. Sage.

                        Could Forrest have even hinted at all six creeks in his final treasure-found post with the three pictures? Look at the caption for the middle picture (“me in the middle”):

                        “The bracelet on my arm was wet when found. The silver tarnished black.”

                        First letters of last six words.

                        My home of Brown was Tepee Creek (tepee = a home of Brown people), but that’s the unimportant half of the clue. What matters is the “Put in below” part. If you are at WWWH and heading down Gallatin Canyon, the very first place you can put in below Tepee Creek that is *also* a literal river put-in is on the right side of the highway shortly after the road crosses over the Gallatin:

                        Click image for larger version Name:	Putin_Spot.jpg Views:	0 Size:	219.7 KB ID:	171609
                        Recall the Amos ‘n’ Andy quote from TTOTC (which Forrest also repeated in SB 232): “Don’t make the alligator mad until you’ve crossed the river.” Notice that alligator contains the letters of Gallatin scrambled except for the N, and maybe Forrest hinted at that missing N by failing to include the second apostrophe of Amos ‘n’ Andy.

                        The closest creek to this location is Sage Creek, about 1000 feet further down river. There is a very good geographic reason you would park here. Anyone want to hazard a guess?

                        Finally (for now), this whole upper section of Gallatin Canyon has a name: Middle Basin. Me in the Middle.
                        Too complicated for me to believe this is the best way to solve this. If a bright 13-year-old wouldn't think this way, I don't tink it's what Fenn had in mind.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Cowboyrocker View Post
                          Good solve... definitely worth the read! Thanks for posting!
                          Thanks Cowboy! I thought you might like it since you've done some poking around in Montana. :-)

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Hi Old Pilot: I appreciate the feedback. I don't think a 13-year-old was meant to solve this, but I agree that a solution can't be too convoluted or involve extensive research from outside the poem. But with several hundred thousand minds working on it for a decade, I think the evidence is that it was not easy.

                            Out of respect for the finder, I resist giving my full solution in the unlikely event it's correct. But I believe my final location is definitely the sort where most would say "Why didn't I think of that?"

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Zapster View Post

                              Thanks Cowboy! I thought you might like it since you've done some poking around in Montana. :-)
                              Yes, indeed!

                              Your solve is really smart! It‘s a rare high IQ solve, fully backed up by hints in the book and ATFs.

                              My own solve was based much more on intuition and (almost) childish simplicity. So I‘d go with Old Far...err Pilot and dare to say that the real one would be quite a bit more.... how do you say... 12 o‘ clock... straight to the chin...

                              I couldn‘t even write too much about my solve because it was a mix of intuitions and scavenger hunt discoveries... and I couldn‘t match the depth of yours at all...

                              All you needed for mine were time, patience, stubbornness, time, meditation, watching birds, time, stubbornness...
                              Last edited by Cowboyrocker; 07-01-2020, 02:06 AM.
                              „It‘s almost impossible to carry the torch of truth through a crowd without singeing somebody‘s beard.“
                              G. C. Lichtenberg

                              Comment

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