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  • #31
    This is all so fascinating for me. I made note of each personality avatar online and ya’ll’s cryptic hints at your maybe shadows of glints of how to solve your puzzle through a kaleidoscope. My problem was, though, even with all the different ideas and theories and locations and meanings, somehow- I still thought everyone used the same kaleidoscope. The one that matched my solve and my logic. The logic of simple and complex and that special grey area in between. I thought you all had my solve and were just teasing me about it. Now everyone comes out of the woodwork with their exact coordinates and I feel pages ripped from communal prayer books.
    Fascinatingly heartbreaking. At the same time.

    edit: maybe it is we who are kaleidoscope. Each of us a piece of shiny glass reflected in more glass and more glass so that one can barely breathe through let alone see though.

    ...and the birds still chirp chirp 10 fold.
    Last edited by Rose Livingstone; 06-29-2020, 12:37 AM.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by GoSlash27 View Post

      From my perspective, whoever went BOTG and didn't find the treasure had an incorrect solve. The correct solve should put the treasure right at your feet, no searching required. Or rather "the site formerly known as the treasure".

      If that's the case, then I'm not sure what if anything can be gleaned from it.

      Best,
      -Slashy
      I dont agree either, it took me 11 trips before I determined that the solution was a three anagram solution. I found the dizzy dean tree or blaze (the raised star) on my 24th trip. I found the actual coordinates on my 28th trip. All the while I was working my way through the poem, understanding the meaning of the words. Fenn knew this was going to take multiple trips to the same location. Forrest knew this was going to take a great deal of effort, it wasnt going to be found over a spring break. It was difficult but not impossible.
      Last edited by Anna Graham; 06-29-2020, 12:46 AM.
      All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident.
      --Arthur Schopenhauer--

      Comment


      • #33
        Originally posted by MobyDic12345 View Post
        , why do you think Forrest said - you won't know if your solution is correct until you find the chest?
        This isn't in conflict with my assertion. Neither is the little girl in India. Fenn also said the person who finds the treasure will have studied the poem over and over, and thought, and analyzed and moved with confidence. Nothing about it will be accidental. He also said "All of the information you need to find the treasure is in the poem". He also said "I do not know the person who found it, but the poem in my book led him to the precise spot."
        This tells me rather strongly that someone who has correctly analyzed the poem would be able to follow the clues directly to the treasure. No poking about or multiple trips required.

        And AFA the little girl in India, naturally she couldn't have found the treasure. She's disabled and it was somewhere she couldn't get to. Needing to make multiple trips doesn't figure into it.

        I think that anyone who goes back to an unsuccessful location is attempting to find validation for an incorrect solve and ultimately cheating themselves out of an opportunity to find the correct one.
        I say this not out of a sense of superiority about my own solve (I have no idea if it's correct or not; never looked) or anything against your solve, but rather simply out of my understanding of everything he's stated as fact about the poem and the hunt.

        Best,
        -Slashy


        Last edited by GoSlash27; 06-29-2020, 06:18 AM.

        Comment


        • #34
          Originally posted by Anna Graham View Post

          I dont agree either, it took me 11 trips before I determined that the solution was a three anagram solution. I found the dizzy dean tree or blaze (the raised star) on my 24th trip. I found the actual coordinates on my 28th trip. All the while I was working my way through the poem, understanding the meaning of the words. Fenn knew this was going to take multiple trips to the same location. Forrest knew this was going to take a great deal of effort, it wasnt going to be found over a spring break. It was difficult but not impossible.
          Anna,
          Apologies if this comes across as mean-spirited (I truly don't intend it that way) but point in fact unless you've got that chest sitting next to you, you haven't actually found anything. Always important to keep firmly in mind the difference between what you believe to be true and what you know to be fact. Also, you cannot possibly know what Fenn "knew". All you know is what he said, and he never said this.

          Best,
          -Slashy

          Comment


          • #35
            Originally posted by GoSlash27 View Post

            From my perspective, whoever went BOTG and didn't find the treasure had an incorrect solve. The correct solve should put the treasure right at your feet, no searching required. Or rather "the site formerly known as the treasure".

            If that's the case, then I'm not sure what if anything can be gleaned from it.

            Best,
            -Slashy
            I don't agree with this. It took me about a week working on it at home to come up with what I now think are the first 4 clues. After that it took me almost 50 BOTG trips in order to narrow it down to my final location. In the end my solve was simple, but there were a lot of rabbit holes between the put-in below the hoB and my final location. Those who have never been BOTG or have only gone a couple times fail to realize that, once you get there, things look a lot different than what you imagined based on GE.

            Comment


            • #36
              Originally posted by GoSlash27 View Post

              This isn't in conflict with my assertion. Neither is the little girl in India. Fenn also said the person who finds the treasure will have studied the poem over and over, and thought, and analyzed and moved with confidence. Nothing about it will be accidental. He also said "All of the information you need to find the treasure is in the poem". He also said "I do not know the person who found it, but the poem in my book led him to the precise spot."
              This tells me rather strongly that someone who has correctly analyzed the poem would be able to follow the clues directly to the treasure. No poking about or multiple trips required.

              And AFA the little girl in India, naturally she couldn't have found the treasure. She's disabled and it was somewhere she couldn't get to. Needing to make multiple trips doesn't figure into it.

              I think that anyone who goes back to an unsuccessful location is attempting to find validation for an incorrect solve and ultimately cheating themselves out of an opportunity to find the correct one.
              I say this not out of a sense of superiority about my own solve (I have no idea if it's correct or not; never looked) or anything against your solve, but rather simply out of my understanding of everything he's stated as fact about the poem and the hunt.

              Best,
              -Slashy

              Couple of things.
              I 100% agree that all information to solve the puzzle is in the poem, and in theory, there is no need to use outside literature to find the hiding place. He also said that in theory you can solve it with no BOTG, but in practice this is impossible (paraphrase).

              The problem with what your're saying is that it appears you have a very simplistic solution, and you never considered that the real solution might be way more complex.
              1. It seems that you haven't considered that the solution might be spread out over a huge geographical area (and not in a straight line 30 miles away).
              2. It seems that you haven't considered that there might be multiple, equally valid logical solutions to some of the clues, with only one solution leading to the next clue.
              3. It seems that you haven't considered that some of the clues might be descriptive and can be only decoded with BOTG.

              I'm not the finder so I cannot tell you how many trips he made to the site, and how many days he spent on the site. I would bet my live on it that he spend more than 60 days on the site (assuming 6 days per tip, this would give 10 trips).
              I bet, just to solve the 9th clue, which I think it's the most difficult, he made at least two trips to the site.

              No offence to your solution, but if the real one was as simple as yours, the treasure would have been found 10 years ago.

              Comment


              • #37
                Originally posted by MobyDic12345 View Post

                Couple of things.
                I 100% agree that all information to solve the puzzle is in the poem, and in theory, there is no need to use outside literature to find the hiding place. He also said that in theory you can solve it with no BOTG, but in practice this is impossible (paraphrase).

                The problem with what your're saying is that it appears you have a very simplistic solution, and you never considered that the real solution might be way more complex.
                1. It seems that you haven't considered that the solution might be spread out over a huge geographical area (and not in a straight line 30 miles away).
                2. It seems that you haven't considered that there might be multiple, equally valid logical solutions to some of the clues, with only one solution leading to the next clue.
                3. It seems that you haven't considered that some of the clues might be descriptive and can be only decoded with BOTG.

                I'm not the finder so I cannot tell you how many trips he made to the site, and how many days he spent on the site. I would bet my live on it that he spend more than 60 days on the site (assuming 6 days per tip, this would give 10 trips).
                I bet, just to solve the 9th clue, which I think it's the most difficult, he made at least two trips to the site.

                No offence to your solution, but if the real one was as simple as yours, the treasure would have been found 10 years ago.
                No offense taken and you're probably correct, bu I think if he had made it as complicated as you have made your solve, 1) he wouldn't have realistically expected anyone to ever find it and 2) he wouldn't have been admonishing people about overthinking it. So I guess we just have to agree to disagree on that one.
                And point of fact, I did spend a lot of time considering all the points you've raised here and a whole lot morethat you quite possibly haven't. I didn't just naively jump on a ridiculously simple and straightforward solution, I decided to go this way intentionally because that was the impression that I got from everything he said about it; it is direct and straightforward, not convoluted and obscure. Anyway...
                Yes, It is true that things will surely look different BOTG, and that I might see something that makes my "go forth with confidence" solve evaporate quicker than a raindrop in a skillet.

                Here's the thing though: If that were to happen, what I would do at that point is stop, regroup, and reevaluate my solve. Does this invalidate my blaze? If so does that invalidate my HoB? Perhaps the entire solve is wrong and I should start fresh. The solve is either completely correct or completely wrong, and I'm not gonna find the treasure by wandering around the one place I know it isn't.

                Best,
                -Slashy
                Last edited by GoSlash27; 06-29-2020, 04:49 PM.

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by Anna Graham View Post

                  I dont agree either, it took me 11 trips before I determined that the solution was a three anagram solution. I found the dizzy dean tree or blaze (the raised star) on my 24th trip. I found the actual coordinates on my 28th trip. All the while I was working my way through the poem, understanding the meaning of the words. Fenn knew this was going to take multiple trips to the same location. Forrest knew this was going to take a great deal of effort, it wasnt going to be found over a spring break. It was difficult but not impossible.
                  The dizzy dean tree / blaze ?


                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by Quest View Post

                    The dizzy dean tree / blaze ?

                    It is raised bark that forms a star on a tree in my search area. Dizzy Dean and Satchel Page were Forrest's hero's. A synonym of hero is star. Forrest found Dizzy on a platform. A platform is a raised surface. Hence raised star. Forrest thought the scrapbook was important enough to include in the revised edition of OUAW.
                    All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident.
                    --Arthur Schopenhauer--

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by GoSlash27 View Post

                      No offense taken and you're probably correct, bu I think if he had made it as complicated as you have made your solve, 1) he wouldn't have realistically expected anyone to ever find it and 2) he wouldn't have been admonishing people about overthinking it. So I guess we just have to agree to disagree on that one.
                      And point of fact, I did spend a lot of time considering all the points you've raised here and a whole lot more. It is true that things will surely look different BOTG, and that I might see something that makes a "go forth with confidence" solve disappear.

                      Here's the thing though: If that were to happen, what I would do at that point is stop, regroup, and think of a different solve. The solve is either completely correct or completely wrong, and I'm not gonna find the treasure by wandering around a place I know it isn't.

                      Best,
                      -Slashy
                      To answer your first point - remember, Forrest was thinking about 100, or even 1000 years down the road. Frankly, Forrest is probably amazed that someone solved the poem in his lifetime.
                      To your second point - perception of overthinking and complication is very relative. To me, using anagrams, ciphers, trying to count poem letters to derive coordinates would be overthinking. He also said, kids might have advantage to decode some of the meaning. Don't you think, this might mean that homonyms are involved?
                      Your third point - 'the solve is either completely correct or completely wrong ...', I disagree again. When the solution covers a large area, every clue is a new puzzle. You might have a partially correct solve (or a general solve as Forrest called it); eg. clues 1 to 8 might be right but clue 9 is wrong.

                      One more point, to me - "go forth with confidence" means that having your final solution, you will know where to park your car, how far to hike, and know your search area within 10 feet square. You have to ask yourself; how does the poem give you this type of accuracy?

                      Well I guess, we have to disagree on these items,

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Originally posted by GoSlash27 View Post

                        Anna,
                        Apologies if this comes across as mean-spirited (I truly don't intend it that way) but point in fact unless you've got that chest sitting next to you, you haven't actually found anything. Always important to keep firmly in mind the difference between what you believe to be true and what you know to be fact. Also, you cannot possibly know what Fenn "knew". All you know is what he said, and he never said this.

                        Best,
                        -Slashy
                        Didnt he? I mean I might have paraphrased, but he did make these statements.

                        "I'm not flippant about this, I mean it's not something that's somebody's going to do on spring break or a Sunday afternoon picnic." Outside magazine 4/27/2015

                        "It's difficult so it won't be found right away, but it's easy enough so that it's not impossible to find it." HuffPost Margie Goldsmith 12/6/2017
                        All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident.
                        --Arthur Schopenhauer--

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Originally posted by Anna Graham View Post

                          Didnt he? I mean I might have paraphrased, but he did make these statements.

                          "I'm not flippant about this, I mean it's not something that's somebody's going to do on spring break or a Sunday afternoon picnic." Outside magazine 4/27/2015

                          "It's difficult so it won't be found right away, but it's easy enough so that it's not impossible to find it." HuffPost Margie Goldsmith 12/6/2017
                          Anna Graham , I suspect you might have misconstrued the context there.
                          "The fact that nobody’s found it I’m frankly surprised. I would hope that somebody would find it before too long. You’re not going to happen on it. You’re not going to find it on spring break or on a Sunday afternoon picnic. You’re going to have to figure out the clues. Go to the first clue, and then the clues are consecutive after that. If you can decipher the clues, you’re gonna find that treasure chest." -FF

                          He wasn't saying it couldn't be done on a single outing or that it would require multiple trips to the same spot to figure out. He was saying that you have to figure out the clues correctly before you begin the search, or at least understand the poem well enough to recognize the clues when you see 'em. You've got to put in the effort, not just take on the hunt as a spur- of-the- moment lark.
                          He also said in the same quote that he was surprised somebody hadn't already found it by then, so... ?

                          I mean... I'm not criticizing your solve or approach. You do anagrams and complex meanings, and that's fine. You do you. I prefer direct and straightforward with as little of my own interpretation applied as possible. We disagree on this and lots of other things I'm sure. No biggie.

                          Best,
                          -Slashy

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Originally posted by MobyDic12345 View Post

                            To answer your first point - remember, Forrest was thinking about 100, or even 1000 years down the road. Frankly, Forrest is probably amazed that someone solved the poem in his lifetime.
                            To your second point - perception of overthinking and complication is very relative. To me, using anagrams, ciphers, trying to count poem letters to derive coordinates would be overthinking. He also said, kids might have advantage to decode some of the meaning. Don't you think, this might mean that homonyms are involved?
                            Your third point - 'the solve is either completely correct or completely wrong ...', I disagree again. When the solution covers a large area, every clue is a new puzzle. You might have a partially correct solve (or a general solve as Forrest called it); eg. clues 1 to 8 might be right but clue 9 is wrong.

                            One more point, to me - "go forth with confidence" means that having your final solution, you will know where to park your car, how far to hike, and know your search area within 10 feet square. You have to ask yourself; how does the poem give you this type of accuracy?

                            Well I guess, we have to disagree on these items,
                            MobyDic12345 ,
                            On your first point, see above.
                            Second point, I'll let you battle that one out with Anna
                            3rd point, I agree with and said the same thing in my previous post. It's a bit more nuanced than that, though. There's a fine line between reevaluating an incorrect "general solve" and searching repeatedly around a busted solve in a vain attempt to make the clues fit. In my *personal* opinion people who do this are just cheating themselves out of an opportunity to find a better solve.
                            4th point, my particular solve does happen to get me confidently to a specific point within a few feet *assuming* I have the correct blaze. I don't think he realized that a seriously compelling blaze might be discovered on the internet through other research, totally outside of GE or the info he provided. But if I go out there (may do it this weekend just to put the matter to rest) I would take into consideration the possibility that my most obvious blaze is incorrect, backtrack to my HoB, and look for something else that says "blaze" to me. If I don't find it, I'm just going to junk the solve. Without the blaze, I don't have the creek, without the creek I don't have the HoB, etc. I'm not going to wander aimlessly around an incorrect solve.

                            But yeah... We can disagree and that's fine.

                            Best,
                            -Slashy

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