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How did you " nail down" where warm waters halt?

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  • How did you " nail down" where warm waters halt?

    I started by buying a 1946 paper map of Wyoming. I figured that was what Forrest and his family would have used on there trips to Yellowstone. I wanted to see what roads they could have used and what places they may have stopped at while traveling to and from Yellowstone. I saw Ft Brown just below Lander and then saw Sinks canyon and began investigating from there.


  • #2
    My initial impression was that WWWH was in Yellowstone even before I knew anything about Fenn. Learning of his childhood reinforced the idea. So I read the book, and there were many stories in it that solidified it in my mind. WWWH had to be Yellowstone in my mind; nothing else fit so well.
    Everything else followed from that point, hunting down and exterminating possible solutions one after the other. Eventually I was left with a solve that I could find absolutely no flaws in whatsoever. That was 3 or 4 years ago I guess. Even to this day, his comments keep agreeing with the spot I decided it had to be. Even the photo looks right.
    I never cared enough about it to go BOTG immediately, just seemed like a cool idea for a road trip that I put on the back burner. Such is life

    Best,
    -Slashy

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    • #3
      About the same time someone named Mike on another blog pointed out that on pg 57 in TTOTC it says "cave" in the bushes just to the right of Forrest's right hand. I looked at that and noticed that it also says "sink" in front of that. That prompted me to look carefully through the other illustrations. I then noticed on pg 67 what looks like the words "moss cav" in the grass under Cody's front legs. When I saw that I went to google and entered "sink cave moss cave" and found out that Sinks canyon is a popular rock climbing destination and there is a place named Moss cave there. I then ended up buying a book called "Lander Rock Climbs" to see if I could find Moss Cave. It was in there and also showed it's location in the canyon. I also recalled Forrest using the word "Belay" incorrectly and thought that he did that to draw attention to rock climbing. So all of that led me to believe that Sinks cave was/is Where warm waters halt.

      Chuck

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      • #4
        Early on I also thought about the distances between clues and figured that they pretty much have to be within sight of each other. If you are putting together clues over long distances there are just too many possibilities.

        Chuck

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        • #5
          Hi Slashy,

          "WWWH had to be Yellowstone in my mind; nothing else fit so well."
          Where in Yellowstone? It's a pretty big area.
          Was there anything in the book (TTOTC) or poem that helped you find the specific location?

          Chuck


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          • #6
            WWWH was the easiest part of my solve. I figured it had something to do with fishing so I looked up the NM Fishing Rules found here:
            http://www.wildlife.state.nm.us/down...s-And-Info.pdf
            The map locating warm waters is on p 8.
            It's interesting that in SB 243 he is reading "A River Runs Through It" and stops on p 8.

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            • #7
              mummy rhymes with rummy, and then there's the whole is this true question, jesus nailed to where the lines meet tie in. One indian mummy with a corn kernel in canyon de chelly and one at LoDaisKa. The pot o'gold is irrelevant, this is a game for johnny of the mt. run boy run, y'all want it to be a kids game, and that's kew, if you don't mind foraging in the dumps of india on your next go.

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              • #8
                Kahn,
                Not sure what you are saying but how did any of what you wrote help you nail down the first clue?
                Chuck

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Redneck Girl View Post
                  WWWH was the easiest part of my solve. I figured it had something to do with fishing so I looked up the NM Fishing Rules found here:
                  http://www.wildlife.state.nm.us/down...s-And-Info.pdf
                  The map locating warm waters is on p 8.
                  It's interesting that in SB 243 he is reading "A River Runs Through It" and stops on p 8.
                  what about world class aqua blue fly fishing in the Seychelles where our boy brad pitt honeymooned 3 times sb115 the gardiner frog that hears in its mouth, hear me all and listen good amphitheater. We're treasure hunters right, every nuance is our guide. How is this scattered? Do yall think if you hunt something it wants to get caught? kinda, but not really.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by crow View Post
                    Kahn,
                    Not sure what you are saying but how did any of what you wrote help you nail down the first clue?
                    Chuck
                    thanks chuck, that's a good point, made me think of the nails in the bells, the Spanish galleon. I GUARANTEE everyone thats a hint. For my incorrect, but deeply intriguing and fascinating solve, it's the 17. Sum of the 7 gifts and 10 commandments, 153 saints rise from the dead and create a new covenant between law and spirit. sb153 proposal under water, it's a chemical marriage, the chest is wet, lead to gold 153 square root of 3 infinity vesica piscis virgin mary start the rotation over again chronological order gospel of john verse 2 redneck sign language. I was just rambling to mess with you.

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                    • #11
                      I see... thanks for clearing that up.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by crow View Post
                        Hi Slashy,

                        "WWWH had to be Yellowstone in my mind; nothing else fit so well."
                        Where in Yellowstone? It's a pretty big area.
                        Was there anything in the book (TTOTC) or poem that helped you find the specific location?

                        Chuck

                        Crow, Not anywhere specific in Yellowstone, but rather Yellowstone itself. And in that context, yeah. There's all sorts of stuff in the book that cemented it for me.
                        "Begin it where warm waters halt" is interpreted in my solve as "Your search begins in YNP." So in that sense the first clue is the area, the next clue is the first waypoint. This (to me) is why he kept stressing that it was so important to establish the first clue first instead of looking for something else like HoB or the blaze; the first clue gives you the area.
                        Best,
                        -Slashy
                        Last edited by GoSlash27; 06-27-2020, 11:06 AM.

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                        • #13
                          How did you " nail down" where warm waters halt?

                          I'm sure Eric Sloane and a couple of close friends could narrow that down.

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                          • #14
                            After endless amounts of rabbit holes, I decided to do what he said and reread the book slowly...keeping the poem in the back of my mind. I came up on one sentence that I found interesting. In TTOTC he says something along the lines of "If I had to look up a word I just wouldn’t use it, and since I'm so easily pleased a lot of things are effortless to me." Keeping the poem in mind, the word "effortless" stuck out. The poem says, "your effort will be worth the cold", So I thought about that sentence in TTOTC a little more. In my mind, he's saying its effortless to know the meaning of words...so logically to me, it takes effort to learn the meaning of words.
                            And that type of effort is what he's talking about in the poem.

                            So that's where my final solve really began. I tried to learn each word's definitions. And not long after, things started to slowly connect. I used a little bit of imagination as to WWWH was. KPRO and COW were right...the first stanza was the hint that gives you WWWH. "Hint of riches new and old" Riches i concluded was waters (literally and metaphorically). New and old was what the poem is ultimately about in my opinion. So new waters to me was WWWH. New can mean your fresh, inexperienced, renewed....etc. In TTOTC when he talks about his youth, he's always talking about gaining experience. He also comes off as a very naïve kid through his stories. For example in No place for Biddies, he talks about crossing the street and his mom always telling him to take a fresh pair of underwear in case of an accident. He's naïve in the thought of his mom talking about car accidents instead of Forrest soiling himself. He says, his mom was "natures perfect example of long-sightedness" (Which I believe is a hint to HOB). But I digress. So WWWH is when he's young and inexperienced. But where does naïve come in? Well after studying the words, it just so happens that a definition of halt is lame. Lame can mean to walk with a limp, but it can also mean (of a person) naïve or inept, especially socially. Inept means lacking skill. So now my interpretation of WWWH is something that is new, fresh and inexperienced or possible young and that is naïve meaning they lack skill. He once asked KPRO, "Did you dip your toe in it?" This was a hint. The idiom to dip your toe into something is to try something out with caution....that you may be inexperienced in. This sort of validated where I was heading. My WWWH was also validated by a subtle hint I found in Looking for Lewis and Clark. There's an idiom that is known as babe in the woods. It is an expression used to describe a person who is young, naïve, inexperienced, and innocent. The idiom originated from a ballad in the 1500s about kids being abandoned in the woods and die, due to their lack of knowledge, skill and experience to survive. In Looking for Lewis and Clark, FF and Donny get lost in the woods as teens and they take with them "Babe Ruth" candy bars. Well here again FF is trying to draw us to his subtle hint. The candy bar is actually named Baby Ruth not "Babe" Ruth. The context of this chapter helps us conclude this idiom. They were "Babes in the wood". So let's go back to the poem for a second. In the last stanza he says, "If you are brave AND IN THE WOOD". Is this a hint that we need to be babes in the wood? That is, lacking skill and being inexperienced and maybe naïve? If it is the hint he intended us to see, then WWWH should lead us to a word that matches this interpretation of the first clue.

                            Knowing he always knew where he was going to hide it, I started looking up towards WY and MT. I came across Green River. I remembered he said you had to marry the clues to a map. So instead of assuming what green meant, I decided to look up the definitions. One of which was this: Green-(of a person), naïve, inexperienced or gullible. Isn't that clever? Green also supported "Riches New", and the hint in TTOTC when FF said he's an environmentalist more than most people. Have you ever heard of Green energy, or the Green Party? The definition of riches-valuable natural resources. It can all fit together. And he also mention the olive jar in his book. Olive being green. And why did he say to have kids look at the poem? Because kids minds are fresh, they are young and inexperienced right? Or if you're new at something they call you green or a greenhorn. By the way, do you remember when FF said the treasure was wet? Well just so happens there's an idiom of being wet behind the ears. It is used as a way to describe someone who is inexperienced. Or if you just want to use a basic definition of wet-lacking forcefulness or strength of character; feeble. Must like he was in his youth when he had anxiety. I began to realize he was giving us hints in plain sight. Anyways...my final solve of WWWH ended up at Green Rivers Lake in Wyoming. It just so happened to be, below Osborn Mountain.

                            Home of Brown (Home of Brown University is in PROVIDENCE, RI), the meaning of the name Osborn is Divine Bear and the definition of Divine is PROVIDENCE or GOD And we can connect the definition of bear to bear weight as in heavy loads and bear a title? I believe he used waters as a way to describe man. So I always took water high as God or something divine. Heavy loads and water high translate to me as Divine Bear aka Osborn. We also see his hints of Providence throughout his book. As stated earlier, "natures perfect example of long-sightedness"...Providence is the ability to foresee. Did you find the title Gypsy's Magic interesting in the book? Well part of their magic was the ability to fortune tell or foresee...as in providence. Or when the bully gives him the book Kismet. It just happens that Providence is a synonym of Kismet. In FF last interview with KPRO and COW I believe the one thing Douglas Preston caught that he wouldn't tell was a hint to Providence. When Cow asked FF one question and tried to follow up with another...FF laughed and looked at Douglas. He said "I'm so far ahead of this guy"...He was in providence. Anyways, I can go on and on with examples I've found but there is one more interest thing about the word "it" and I believe it's solved with the word quest. Quest-an expedition done by a knight to accomplish a prescribed task. We all know FF purposely has misspelled words to get his point across. I believe the point he was trying to portray with this was that his intentions were not to use the word Knight, but give you a hint that the search or at least a part of hit had to be done at "night". That is why he used words which related to medieval times such as Keep, Halt, Quest, Title, Blaze etc. They were all put with the intention of drawing the searcher to the word title...which is given to a Knight. Again, it isn't so much as being a Knight, but as in going at night. Why do you think when the searcher found it he said "it was under a canopy of stars?" Knights were chivalrous, and charming. They had Blazons, and coat of arms. Why do you think he said to smile at a homely girl, and also in the book he mentions Shakespeare and he has found a sense of being reborn. To open the door for her, not because its nice but to show her you cared...etc. He's being chivalrous...this all eludes to the fact that the title you get is being a Knight by going at night. Anyways I know I veered from the main topic but figured I'd throw my solve out there since it's over.

                            Apologies for the grammatical errors as this post was done by haste with kids running chaotically in the background.
                            Last edited by DanNun; 06-27-2020, 11:10 PM.

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                            • #15
                              First I solved the 2nd clue which is "And with my treasures bold".
                              By center justifying the poem, f's treasured words stands out and becomes bold.

                              So now , if you loosely trace along the 3rd stanza's edges and use your imagination, it looks like a puffy white rain cloud.
                              ​​​​
                              This cloud is where warm waters halt and where you begin solving the poem.

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