Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Does Forrest want us to use the picture of the chest to narrow down the location?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Does Forrest want us to use the picture of the chest to narrow down the location?

    I think there may be a lot of information in the picture of the chest that could help identify the location. Maybe that’s what Forrest wants us to do.

    The first thing that was noticeable to me is the pine needles. As Presque vu pointed out, they are shaped like pinyon needles. By comparing the length of the pine needles with the diameter of the coins in the chest, it also appears that they could be pinyon. The resolution isn’t good enough to identify the pinecones but it’s apparent that, like pinyon, they are very small in size. The resolution also makes it difficult to identify the twigs next to the chest. They could be from pinyon, but they could also be from a number of other trees.

    The next thing I noticed is the color of the soil. Because of the lighting (or possibly photo-shopping) it’s difficult to say what color the soil really is. Dried pine needles, regardless of type, are brownish in color. Most of the pine needles in the photo appear grey, as does the surrounding soil. Perhaps the soil is actually more brownish in color. The soil in the area I was searching was reddish in color (I thought the word “tired” in the poem was a combination of red and dirt) so this could rule out my location.

    I haven’t seen much discussion about the wood in the upper right hand corner of the photo. Owlman on Dal’s suggested that it could be cottonwood given its rot pattern (sorry but I can’t seem to find his post). It could have been driftwood washed down river. Vestelpatience pointed out that it appears like the top of the chest was flush with the ground. Perhaps Forrest used pieces of wood he found along the riverbank to cover the top of the chest. I’ll admit that I am biased on this one since there is a lot of cottonwood just upriver from where I was searching.

    Owlman also said that the “grass” looks like sedge. This could be another hint that the location is very close to a river.

    Please add your comments, but try to be objective. Like I already said, my search area could be ruled out based on the color of the dirt.


  • #2
    You might be right. If he didn't want us to narrow down the location then he could have easily cropped the photo to get rid of some of the details like the pine needles.

    Comment


    • #3
      As soon as he said “lush” it eliminated my search area. The grass does look like sedge... interesting ideas.

      Comment


      • #4
        If that is a pinyon pine cone, I'll eat it. ;-) It's mostly likely a lodgepole pine cone. The pinyon cone is probably the least like all the other pine cones. Compare:
        Click image for larger version

Name:	Pinecone_by_chest.jpg
Views:	464
Size:	37.0 KB
ID:	166830
        Pinyon Pine:
        Click image for larger version

Name:	Pinus_edulis.jpg
Views:	466
Size:	456.3 KB
ID:	166831
        Lodgepole pine:
        Click image for larger version

Name:	Lodegpole_pinecone.jpg
Views:	466
Size:	238.1 KB
ID:	166832

        Comment


        • #5
          Raccoons taste like pine cones. The dirt caked on the edges is sandy.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by khan View Post
            Raccoons taste like pine cones. The dirt caked on the edges is sandy.
            I think you mean porcupines. ;-)

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Vestalpatience View Post
              As soon as he said “lush” it eliminated my search area. The grass does look like sedge... interesting ideas.
              I'm not sure what he meant by the word lush. When I first read it I thought that it eliminated my search area as well. Then I remembered the NM tourism video wherein he said that if he was at the location of the chest he'd smell pinyon nuts and sage. Sage doesn't tend to grow in what I'd call a "lush" area.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Zapster View Post
                If that is a pinyon pine cone, I'll eat it. ;-) It's mostly likely a lodgepole pine cone. The pinyon cone is probably the least like all the other pine cones. Compare:
                Click image for larger version

Name:	Pinecone_by_chest.jpg
Views:	464
Size:	37.0 KB
ID:	166830
                Pinyon Pine:
                Click image for larger version

Name:	Pinus_edulis.jpg
Views:	466
Size:	456.3 KB
ID:	166831
                Lodgepole pine:
                Click image for larger version

Name:	Lodegpole_pinecone.jpg
Views:	466
Size:	238.1 KB
ID:	166832
                Both the lodgepole pine cone and the pinyon pine cone appear to be similar in size. As someone pointed out, the appearance of the pinyon cone (and probably all pinecones) depends on the stage of development. I was going more by the length of the pine needles. The lodgepole needles are 1.2"-2.4" in length while the pinyon are 0.75"- 1.5", so the lodgepole tend to be significantly longer.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Zapster View Post
                  If that is a pinyon pine cone, I'll eat it. ;-) It's mostly likely a lodgepole pine cone. The pinyon cone is probably the least like all the other pine cones. Compare:
                  Click image for larger version  Name:	Pinecone_by_chest.jpg Views:	0 Size:	37.0 KB ID:	166830
                  Pinyon Pine:
                  Click image for larger version  Name:	Pinus_edulis.jpg Views:	0 Size:	456.3 KB ID:	166831
                  Lodgepole pine:
                  Click image for larger version  Name:	Lodegpole_pinecone.jpg Views:	0 Size:	238.1 KB ID:	166832
                  Well Zap I can tell you didn't grow up around pinyon and pine and eat the seeds every year, they are really good and healthy for you, roasted they are the best, much better than eating the cone, but anyway the cone is a ? But the needles are not. Though I will say a lodgepole pine does have two needles also.
                  Last edited by Presque vu; 06-18-2020, 05:11 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    The finder owns the photographs. That said I don't think you can trust anything you can deduce from the photographs other than the background was changed as shown conclusively by Mr./ OH! Unfortunately, we only get to see what the finder wants us to see and nothing more. Forrest had no say in what to show. It was either take it or leave it. If you want you can try to analyze the back ground, but remember, the finder is trying to get you in the back seat.
                    1f
                    Last edited by Sherif Billy; 06-18-2020, 04:59 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Or... The driftwood is there because the chest was literally sitting right next to a creek.
                      Click image for larger version

Name:	columnar-lava.jpg
Views:	424
Size:	444.3 KB
ID:	166860
                      That bright red mark on the wall was the "blaze" in my solve. I would've followed the right bank of the creek upstream until I saw it, then looked down. Alas, I never went to look. Was going to go this summer, but you know..."bat soup flu".
                      -Slashy

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by GoSlash27 View Post
                        Or... The driftwood is there because the chest was literally sitting right next to a creek.
                        Click image for larger version

Name:	columnar-lava.jpg
Views:	424
Size:	444.3 KB
ID:	166860
                        That bright red mark on the wall was the "blaze" in my solve. I would've followed the right bank of the creek upstream until I saw it, then looked down. Alas, I never went to look. Was going to go this summer, but you know..."bat soup flu".
                        -Slashy
                        Beautiful picture! I also wondered if the chest was right next to a creek. That would explain the contents being wet.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Presque vu View Post

                          Well Zap I can tell you didn't grow up around pinyon and pine and eat the seeds every year, they are really good and healthy for you, roasted they are the best, much better than eating the cone, but anyway the cone is a ? But the needles are not.
                          Presque vu - Before yesterday, I was the last person on earth to talk to about pine cones, so take my comments with a grain of salt. For all I know, you could be absolutely correct and the needles are pinyon.

                          That said, to my eyes that does look similar to the pictures I’ve now seen of lodgepole pine cones. I also have since learned that lodgepole pine needles have two needles per bundle that are 1-3” long which also seem to be what’s on the ground in the picture.

                          I’m not saying I think pinyon has been eliminated, just that I don’t think it’s fair to eliminate lodgepole just yet.

                          I would love to have an expert tell us. Fascinating stuff if we could definitively prove what state it was in because of this picture!

                          Last edited by minotaur_moreno; 06-18-2020, 05:26 PM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Sherif Billy View Post
                            The finder owns the photographs. That said I don't think you can trust anything you can deduce from the photographs other than the background was changed as shown conclusively by Mr./ OH! Unfortunately, we only get to see what the finder wants us to see and nothing more. Forrest had no say in what to show. It was either take it or leave it. If you want you can try to analyze the back ground, but remember, the finder is trying to get you in the back seat.
                            1f
                            Sherif,
                            I usually agree with what you say, but this is one case in which I don't. Forrest knew what the treasure location looked like. If he thought the photo the finder sent him had been altered, then why did he post that much of it? He could have at least cropped it to take out the pine needles and pine cones. Is Forrest trying to deliberately mislead us? I have to admit that I would be happy to know that the grey dirt was photo-shopped.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by minotaur_moreno View Post

                              I’m not saying I think pinyon has been eliminated, just that I don’t think it’s fair to eliminate lodgepole just yet.

                              I would love to have an expert tell us. Fascinating stuff if we could definitively prove what state it was in because of this picture!
                              Good point Minotaur! Someone around here must know an expert who can make a definite identification of the pine needles and pine cones.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X