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Was it going to be the "tenth" clue or the "final" clue?

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  • Was it going to be the "tenth" clue or the "final" clue?

    In his foreward to Once Upon a While, Doug Preston recalled Forrest's early plans for hiding a treasure chest: "when the cancer came back, he would travel to a secret place. . . . He would leave behind a poem containing clues. . . . Whoever was clever enough to figure out the poem and find his grave was welcome to rob it and take the treasure for themselves. The final clue, he said, would be where they found his car: in the parking lot of the Denver Museum of Nature and Science."

    I have seen/heard searchers refer to this "final" clue as the "tenth" clue, but I have not seen/heard Forrest or Doug refer to it this way. Has anyone else? (If so, would you be willing to share the source?)

    I might be wrong -- Forrest might have planned to leave a "tenth" clue, maybe one that could be "married" to a tenth location, and that location might have had something to do with the Denver museum, etc. -- but I'm inclined to trust Doug's recollection and to understand Forrest's original plans in the context of the early 1990s, when he first shared them with Doug. And so, as far as I can tell, Forrest did not originally plan to publish a memoir with any additional directions (nor any "subtle clues," nor "a couple of good hints," nor "some subtle hints," nor any "abstract things," nor "a couple of aberrations"). The original plan was to just leave behind "a poem containing clues." According to Doug (and basic math), Forrest had started to work on this poem by the mid 1990s as well.

    The idea for publishing a memoir came much later, apparently after J. D. Salinger died in January 2010. We don't really know how much the poem evolved between the mid 1990s and the late 2000s, but I would guess that the early version (like the final version) did not contain a line referencing "the mountains somewhere north of Santa Fe." Yet that general location seems to be vital information. It also seems like Forrest knew this when he first shared his plans, so I'm inclined to think that the final clue Forrest would have given ended up being the first clue he actually gave: that the starting point is in "the mountains somewhere north of Santa Fe."

    Had he followed his original plan, I think he might have left the "poem containing clues" behind in his home (with a letter to his loved ones). I also think he might have planned to leave this "final" clue, in writing, in his car, which he could have parked at the Denver museum or some other place outside of Santa Fe.

    But, again, I might be wrong. (And, if so, I'd be happy to find out.)

  • #2
    I believe the clue was the actual location of his car. I could tell you where I think it would be parked but then I would be solving clues for others. Good luck !

    Comment


    • #3
      Hi Harry: I think it's a mistake for searchers to translate "final clue" to mean a 10th clue, or to even consider the location of the parked car to be a "clue" in the same sense as the nine clues in the poem. I think a safer interpretation is that the car's location would be the final forensic hint as to where Forrest was headed, and that might not be a very helpful hint at all. Just because the trail of breadcrumbs ends at the Denver Museum doesn't mean that's an indication of the state the treasure is hidden (or not hidden). I suppose it might be a little concerning to someone who believes the treasure is hidden in northern New Mexico. After all, if your goal was to throw people off and ditch your car in a state other than the one you hid the treasure, and the treasure is to be hidden in NM, why not go all-in and ditch your car in Montana?

      Comment


      • #4
        I heard Fenn to say there were "nigh N" clues, meaning somewhere near 19 (as N = 19); perhaps he didn't wish to disclose the exact number so The Chase could go "nigh-a-hundred years" which is to say roughly one century. I'm not sure if all 17 or 18 clues are in the poem in the back of his book, or if the "surprise" in 2020 is another book/poem with the remainder of the as-of-yet undisclosed clues. It's encouraging to think I may already be half way there.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Ed E. Waters View Post
          I heard Fenn to say there were "nigh N" clues, meaning somewhere near 19 (as N = 19); perhaps he didn't wish to disclose the exact number so The Chase could go "nigh-a-hundred years" which is to say roughly one century. I'm not sure if all 17 or 18 clues are in the poem in the back of his book, or if the "surprise" in 2020 is another book/poem with the remainder of the as-of-yet undisclosed clues. It's encouraging to think I may already be half way there.
          N=19? I can see N=14 (alphabet position or atomic weight), or N=7 (element).

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Zapster View Post

            N=19? I can see N=14 (alphabet position or atomic weight), or N=7 (element).
            Sorry. I think I gave myself a high-5 and got confused.

            Also, a 9 looks like a well-roundeded 4 to my eyes.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Harry View Post
              In his foreward to Once Upon a While, Doug Preston recalled Forrest's early plans for hiding a treasure chest: "when the cancer came back, he would travel to a secret place. . . . He would leave behind a poem containing clues. . . . Whoever was clever enough to figure out the poem and find his grave was welcome to rob it and take the treasure for themselves. The final clue, he said, would be where they found his car: in the parking lot of the Denver Museum of Nature and Science."

              I have seen/heard searchers refer to this "final" clue as the "tenth" clue, but I have not seen/heard Forrest or Doug refer to it this way. Has anyone else? (If so, would you be willing to share the source?)

              I might be wrong -- Forrest might have planned to leave a "tenth" clue, maybe one that could be "married" to a tenth location, and that location might have had something to do with the Denver museum, etc. -- but I'm inclined to trust Doug's recollection and to understand Forrest's original plans in the context of the early 1990s, when he first shared them with Doug. And so, as far as I can tell, Forrest did not originally plan to publish a memoir with any additional directions (nor any "subtle clues," nor "a couple of good hints," nor "some subtle hints," nor any "abstract things," nor "a couple of aberrations"). The original plan was to just leave behind "a poem containing clues." According to Doug (and basic math), Forrest had started to work on this poem by the mid 1990s as well.

              The idea for publishing a memoir came much later, apparently after J. D. Salinger died in January 2010. We don't really know how much the poem evolved between the mid 1990s and the late 2000s, but I would guess that the early version (like the final version) did not contain a line referencing "the mountains somewhere north of Santa Fe." Yet that general location seems to be vital information. It also seems like Forrest knew this when he first shared his plans, so I'm inclined to think that the final clue Forrest would have given ended up being the first clue he actually gave: that the starting point is in "the mountains somewhere north of Santa Fe."

              Had he followed his original plan, I think he might have left the "poem containing clues" behind in his home (with a letter to his loved ones). I also think he might have planned to leave this "final" clue, in writing, in his car, which he could have parked at the Denver museum or some other place outside of Santa Fe.

              But, again, I might be wrong. (And, if so, I'd be happy to find out.)
              The final clue could be referring to clue number nine.
              All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident.
              --Arthur Schopenhauer--

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Anna Graham View Post

                The final clue could be referring to clue number nine.
                I think the TC itself is the LAST clue, but there is one subtle penultimate hint/clue
                which runs in parallel, the proverbial Rumpelstiltskin-wink, which one must discern
                in situ before yelling Eureka!

                Also, as Fenn references Norse Gods / myth multiple times (a fact to which the Title of this site pays homage)
                I believe the words "Final Clue," in themselves, provide us with a hint to the ... final clue.

                For example:

                "Final Clue" = 'Fine' / 'Ull' / Clu

                Fine -- of high quality + small/thin/difficult to find + to make smaller or 're-fine' + satisfying
                Ull -- Thor's nephew. God of Winter, Hunting, Skiing, Glory & Triumph.

                Click image for larger version  Name:	fine def.PNG Views:	0 Size:	56.7 KB ID:	137230

                ULL:
                Click image for larger version  Name:	Ull 3.PNG Views:	0 Size:	10.4 KB ID:	137233
                Click image for larger version  Name:	Ull 2.PNG Views:	0 Size:	62.3 KB ID:	137234

                Click image for larger version  Name:	Ull 1.PNG Views:	0 Size:	10.7 KB ID:	137236
                ​​​

                Note: the final 2 letters in "Ull" are lines running in parallel like a pair of skis.

                Note: The path he treads is said to BLAZE a trail to GLORY (sound the Trumpets ...)


                I give U (upside down omega indicating the path LS has taken to arrive at final spot)
                tight (in close proximity)
                ULL (parallel lines) --
                2 the Gold

                To reiterate:

                as Fine = highly detailed and extremely difficult to discover,
                I imagine this penultimate clue requires a deeply discerning eye.

                as Ull = Winter, Hunting, Skiis, Parallel Lines, Gold
                we can perhaps deduce that the 'Final Clue' is somehow
                anchored in to the realm over which Thor's nephew presides.

                (All IMO, of course.)

                See the below Ullistration ...

                Click image for larger version  Name:	Ull Illustration.jpg Views:	0 Size:	73.7 KB ID:	137237
                Attached Files
                Last edited by Ed E. Waters; 01-21-2020, 11:03 PM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Ed E. Waters View Post

                  I think the TC itself is the LAST clue, but there is one subtle penultimate hint/clue
                  which runs in parallel, the proverbial Rumpelstiltskin-wink, which one must discern
                  in situ before yelling Eureka!

                  Also, as Fenn references Norse Gods / myth multiple times (a fact to which the Title of this site pays homage)
                  I believe the words "Final Clue," in themselves, provide us with a hint to the ... final clue.

                  For example:

                  "Final Clue" = 'Fine' / 'Ull' / Clu

                  Fine -- of high quality + small/thin/difficult to find + to make smaller or 're-fine' + satisfying
                  Ull -- Thor's nephew. God of Winter, Hunting, Skiing, Glory & Triumph.

                  Click image for larger version Name:	fine def.PNG Views:	0 Size:	56.7 KB ID:	137230

                  ULL:
                  Click image for larger version Name:	Ull 3.PNG Views:	0 Size:	10.4 KB ID:	137233
                  Click image for larger version Name:	Ull 2.PNG Views:	0 Size:	62.3 KB ID:	137234

                  Click image for larger version Name:	Ull 1.PNG Views:	0 Size:	10.7 KB ID:	137236
                  ​​​

                  Note: the final 2 letters in "Ull" are lines running in parallel like a pair of skis.

                  Note: The path he treads is said to BLAZE a trail to GLORY (sound the Trumpets ...)


                  I give U (upside down omega indicating the path LS has taken to arrive at final spot)
                  tight (in close proximity)
                  ULL (parallel lines) --
                  2 the Gold

                  To reiterate:

                  as Fine = highly detailed and extremely difficult to discover,
                  I imagine this penultimate clue requires a deeply discerning eye.

                  as Ull = Winter, Hunting, Skiis, Parallel Lines, Gold
                  we can perhaps deduce that the 'Final Clue' is somehow
                  anchored in to the realm over which Thor's nephew presides.

                  (All IMO, of course.)

                  See the below Ullistration ...

                  Click image for larger version Name:	Ull Illustration.jpg Views:	0 Size:	73.7 KB ID:	137237
                  Makes perfect sense to me.
                  It's all downhill from here.
                  Oops - how do you stop when you get to the bottom?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Zapster View Post
                    Hi Harry: I think it's a mistake for searchers to translate "final clue" to mean a 10th clue, or to even consider the location of the parked car to be a "clue" in the same sense as the nine clues in the poem. I think a safer interpretation is that the car's location would be the final forensic hint as to where Forrest was headed, and that might not be a very helpful hint at all. Just because the trail of breadcrumbs ends at the Denver Museum doesn't mean that's an indication of the state the treasure is hidden (or not hidden). I suppose it might be a little concerning to someone who believes the treasure is hidden in northern New Mexico. After all, if your goal was to throw people off and ditch your car in a state other than the one you hid the treasure, and the treasure is to be hidden in NM, why not go all-in and ditch your car in Montana?
                    I agree Zap. I'm inclined to think of the car left in the Denver Museum parking lot as not really a clue but more than just a hint. A hint/clue if you will.
                    Post-it note

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Ed E. Waters View Post
                      I heard Fenn to say there were "nigh N" clues, meaning somewhere near 19 (as N = 19); perhaps he didn't wish to disclose the exact number so The Chase could go "nigh-a-hundred years" which is to say roughly one century. I'm not sure if all 17 or 18 clues are in the poem in the back of his book, or if the "surprise" in 2020 is another book/poem with the remainder of the as-of-yet undisclosed clues. It's encouraging to think I may already be half way there.
                      Forrest wrote in The Thrill of the Chase, "I wrote a poem containing nine clues."

                      Personally, I think that means there are 9 clues, not 17 or 18.

                      (If you have solved half of 17 or 18 clues, and if my math is correct, you actually might be very close to finding the chest!)

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Harry I tend to lean toward that there are nine clues to get us to the treasure; if we arrive and there is something more to solve, we solve it, but we're still where we need to be to be able to find the treasure; if that makes sense.
                        One of the secrets of life is that all that is really worth the doing is what we do for others. - Lewis Carroll

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by RahRah View Post
                          Harry I tend to lean toward that there are nine clues to get us to the treasure; if we arrive and there is something more to solve, we solve it, but we're still where we need to be to be able to find the treasure; if that makes sense.
                          I agree there is still more to solve once u get there. Maybe the museum can help with that.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Maybe you're suppose to read something on the sign in the correct parking lot. Perhaps like the words "columnar basalt joints" has a hidden translation like... (columnar) company light, (basalt) be assault, or bah say light, or fish alternative... joints (joy nights). Just an idea, another angle...

                            Click image for larger version  Name:	Screenshot_20200107-211236_Google.jpg Views:	0 Size:	642.7 KB ID:	137318

                            Not afraid to let my little light shine...

                            Click image for larger version  Name:	Screenshot_20200111-224842_PicsArt.jpg Views:	0 Size:	915.4 KB ID:	137319

                            and look under every stone, heap or tear.
                            Last edited by Castellaw1685; 01-22-2020, 08:33 AM.
                            Miles up in the air he flew, He just murmured, Toodle-oo!
                            Righty-O!

                            Comment

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