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  • THIRTEEN

    Forrest says on Page 6 of TTOTC that his mind stays at about age 13.
    So if he was to write this poem as a 13 year old, would you interpret it differently?

    Read the poem once again and imagine the words and thoughts of a 13 year old Forrest Fenn.


  • #2
    If this statement was not important, why would he say that?
    Last edited by wwwamericana; 01-16-2020, 07:04 PM.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by wwwamericana View Post
      It this statement was not important, why would he say that?
      Could be why he says a kid might have an advantage but he won't say why. A kid at heart will not presume but will explore and kick over a log or two.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by wwwamericana View Post
        Forrest says on Page 6 of TTOTC that his mind stays at about age 13.
        So if he was to write this poem as a 13 year old, would you interpret it differently?


        Let's see? As 13 year old male, oh boy that may get a little to erotic for this blog. HA-HA

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        • #5
          I have seen talk about "kicking over a log" or "turning over a log" many times. But I'm not convinced that it's useful . . . especially since it's not in the poem. However, I'll try to remember all of this.

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          • #6
            a couple things crossed my mind with the give the poem to a child.
            They would read it like a story. Well it is.
            They might mispronounce words to give them different meanings. That still could be.
            They might draw a picture of a map using the imagination. Like we should be doing.
            I originally thought they would look at the map next to the poem and see the images needed to start. wwwwh.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Old Pilot View Post
              I have seen talk about "kicking over a log" or "turning over a log" many times. But I'm not convinced that it's useful . . . especially since it's not in the poem. However, I'll try to remember all of this.
              LOL - you should remember.
              Unless of course you have been too busy sawing logs, ole Pilot.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Old Pilot View Post
                I have seen talk about "kicking over a log" or "turning over a log" many times. But I'm not convinced that it's useful . . . especially since it's not in the poem. However, I'll try to remember all of this.
                I think it has more to do with stones but not in the context that most think. He said, “…one should not let knowing a little bit be a substitute for learning more.” When it comes to a treasure hunt, leave no stone un-turned or tidbit unstudied.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Sunburnt1 View Post
                  a couple things crossed my mind with the give the poem to a child.
                  They would read it like a story. Well it is.
                  They might mispronounce words to give them different meanings. That still could be.
                  They might draw a picture of a map using the imagination. Like we should be doing.
                  I originally thought they would look at the map next to the poem and see the images needed to start. wwwwh.
                  Drawing out how you think what Fenn is saying, as a picture, definitely helped me see how the words looked as a picture; but there is more than one way to draw it out, so try different things too!

                  One of the secrets of life is that all that is really worth the doing is what we do for others. - Lewis Carroll

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                  • #10
                    Just watch out for the dog walker~
                    https://youtu.be/W2apXO0RXYo
                    Miles up in the air he flew, He just murmured, Toodle-oo!
                    Righty-O!

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                    • #11
                      The raven speaks!

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                      • #12
                        At 13 you take more chances and break little laws. No tresspassing meant NOTHING to me. It also means damaging things means run. Im a goody two shoes, i dont like the 13yo thing. The 80yo thing offsets it.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by findingit View Post

                          I think it has more to do with stones but not in the context that most think. He said, “…one should not let knowing a little bit be a substitute for learning more.” When it comes to a treasure hunt, leave no stone un-turned or tidbit unstudied.
                          Good one (stones).

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                          • #14
                            At 13, I can't remember if I still believed in Santa then but I'll always remember the feeling I would get listening to sleigh bells. Did you know another name for sleigh bells are crotals. Doesn't f like making bells?

                            You know, One Horse Open Sleigh reminds me of TTOTC publishing company One Horse Land and Cattle Company. Is that why it is named that way? Is that a hint for us to look for some of f's bronze crotals along the path??

                            Hmmm....probably 'sounded' better if I kept that thought to myself.

                            Double-gloved Chameleon

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                            • #15
                              Turn over a log. Let's see, if I rotate it 180 degrees I get 601... ;-)

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