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Is stanza one about death?

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  • Is stanza one about death?

    Stanza 1:
    As I have gone alone in there
    And with my treasures bold,
    I can keep my secret where,
    And hint of riches new and old.

    From the Moby Dickens book signing:
    "It just so happened that Ralph Lauren came to my house. He collects antique Indian things like I did. He didn’t know that I had cancer. We were standing in my library and I had something that he wanted. It was a beautiful Sioux Indian bonnet with white ermine skins hanging on it and split antelope horns. It was a wonderful thing. He wanted to buy it. I said, “Well I don’t want to sell it.” He said, “Well you have so many of those things. He said you can’t take it with you.” I said, “Then I’m not going.” We laughed and changed the subject.
    That night I started thinking about that. Who says can’t take it with me? Why do I have to live by everybody else’s rules? If I’m going to die of cancer, I’m going to take some stuff with me and I made up my mind."

    Where is he talking about going? Where is he going to take his treasures? Where is the only place you must enter alone?
    The answer is... death.

    Remember, this poem was originally going to be seen after Forrest went off to die with his treasure. Reading it in that light, he is speaking to us from the afterlife... so he can still have his secret and hint about his treasure from beyond the grave.

    "Who says I can’t influence the future? Who says can’t take it with me? I don’t believe in those things." - ff

    Last edited by DesertCloak; 09-11-2019, 01:52 PM.
    Life is short and the world is wide


  • #2
    Originally posted by DesertCloak View Post
    Stanza 1:
    As I have gone alone in there
    And with my treasures bold,
    I can keep my secret where,
    And hint of riches new and old.

    From the Moby Dickens book signing:
    "It just so happened that Ralph Lauren came to my house. He collects antique Indian things like I did. He didn’t know that I had cancer. We were standing in my library and I had something that he wanted. It was a beautiful Sioux Indian bonnet with white ermine skins hanging on it and split antelope horns. It was a wonderful thing. He wanted to buy it. I said, “Well I don’t want to sell it.” He said, “Well you have so many of those things. He said you can’t take it with you.” I said, “Then I’m not going.” We laughed and changed the subject.
    That night I started thinking about that. Who says can’t take it with me? Why do I have to live by everybody else’s rules? If I’m going to die of cancer, I’m going to take some stuff with me and I made up my mind."

    Where is he talking about going? Where is he going to take his treasures? Where is the only place you must enter alone?
    The answer is... death.

    Remember, this poem was originally going to be seen after Forrest went off to die with his treasure. Reading it in that light, he is speaking to us from the afterlife... so he can still have his secret and hint about his treasure from beyond the grave.

    "Who says I can’t influence the future? Who says can’t take it with me? I don’t believe in those things." - ff
    You don't have to enter death alone, if you and others are all part of a mass killing (by whatever means). All my opinion, as a non-sheepleherder

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    • #3
      That stanza has most of the info needed to solve wwwh fwiw
      Last edited by Mr hand; 09-11-2019, 06:02 PM.

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      • #4
        On today's date, it's hard not to think about death... may the future and our understanding of one another bring brighter tomorrows in our hearts and heads. Let us find peace and direction that makes sense, before we all go alone in there... though only for a moment. This I know.
        E<

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