Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Language and the Theory of Everything

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Language and the Theory of Everything

    Someone on this forum told me that knowledge of an ancient language won't help in this treasure hunt, despite that language being ancestral to our common tongue--that the search was designed for rednecks, the implication being that rednecks aren't educated or insightful enough to approach it like an intellectual. This was in response to my assertion that understanding the meanings of words is essential to solving the puzzle. I didn't explain the theory behind this assertion in any amount of detail and see no reason to, presently, but perhaps a demonstration might be helpful to reshaping the average redneck searcher's paradigm. This won't help anyone otherwise; if you want the chest, you'll still have to work for it.

    As we all know from TTOTC, Forrest likes to make up words. He gives the example of 'flutterby,' an anagram of 'butterfly.' Of course, 'flutter by' describes the action which a butterfly might take in the eyes of an observer, and is therefore actually more relevant to understanding what a butterfly is than the name given to it, which is the purpose of naming it, and hence also why renaming it is more than just a frivolous exercise or a meaningless pun. 'Rhopalocera' or (including moths) 'Lepidoptera' would be better yet, but if I said that then you wouldn't even know what I was talking about, and in terms of the treasure hunt, it might even be considered special knowledge, although I think it's unwise to assume that Forrest would think that. Think about it; the person who discovers a new species (or mineral, or astronomical entity, etc.) is the one who gets to name it. And scientists use nomenclature which describes observations which apply to every member of the species. For example, 'Lepidoptera' means "scaly wings." I imagine that's boring to Forrest, who prefers to focus on an action from his individual perspective.

    Someone might recognize the "flutterby" hint as a hint, since it's in TTOTC. But you probably don't look at his "300 miles west of Toledo" comment as a hint because it's so obvious and he even said it won't help you (or at least the one who wrote him that email) very much. After all, this puts you about 1000 miles east of the Rocky Mountains. And I'm not saying this is intentional, but a wise person could still use it to get into Forrest's mind, as opposed to chalking it up to "coincidence."

    As I'm sure many (though not all) residents of the area would, I locate the central hub of Toledo at the University of Toledo, particularly the Health Sciences Campus which until a week ago was a nationally-recognized regional hospital with a Level 1 trauma center. (I moved from three states away specifically to go to medical school there. You might choose the zoo or the art museum, etc., but any option fits the present purpose, given that they're all at least 300 miles from the destination.) As I made my trip to Forrest's special spot, I didn't come from that direction, so my odometer reading began at the Maumee Toll Plaza which takes you to the Ohio Turnpike (I-80/I-90). (The difference being that in real life, you have to stop to get gas and to rest and that kind of thing.) The best route to the Rockies, via I-80, splits with I-90 and merges with I-94 outside Gary, whereas I-90 takes you through Chicago but otherwise takes you all the way to Sheridan, WY or Billings, MT. (I-80 also cuts through Wyoming via Cheyenne toward Salt Lake City.)

    Type these directions into Google and your best route will be calculated at exactly 300 miles:

    The University of Toledo Medical Center, 3000 Arlington Ave, Toledo, OH 43614
    FlutterBy Gourmet Popcorn, 723 S Clark St, North Utica, IL 61373

    Why "flutterby" though? Wiktionary says it's "childish," and Forrest thinks he has the mind of a tweenie. Yes, the hunt was designed for rednecks and not intellectuals, but that's with the understanding that rednecks, like children, still have imaginations, and are therefore more likely to be aligned with his own ideas, whereas intellectuals may or may not have it programmed out of them by indoctrination. But if it were true that knowledge or even education was antithetical to imagination, then he wouldn't have quoted Einstein of all people to that end. Einstein was the type of intellectual who had lots of knowledge and a stellar reputation because he upset the status quo and advanced our understanding of the universe but fell short of being smart/wise specifically because he didn't believe in coincidence, to the point of failing to accept the validity of the Quantum Theory even after it was thoroughly established, and never finding what he was looking for (the Theory of Everything which he wasted 30+ years of his life pursuing).

    The imagination is necessary for making the correct observations, so children have an advantage, but only over someone without such imagination. In the words of Lex Luthor, "Some people can read War and Peace and come away thinking it's a simple adventure story. Others can read the ingredients on a chewing gum wrapper and unlock the secrets of the universe."

  • #2
    Wow! Can I have a piece of gum?
    Gonna have to take some time and think about what you just said.

    Comment


    • #3
      Einstein wasted 30+ years searching for a Theory of Everything?

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Rose Livingstone View Post
        Einstein wasted 30+ years searching for a Theory of Everything?
        No time spent in thought is wasted.
        In my opinion.

        Comment


        • #5
          „In the words of Lex Luthor, "Some people can read War and Peace and come away thinking it's a simple adventure story. Others can read the ingredients on a chewing gum wrapper and unlock the secrets of the universe."

          I‘d prefer „War and Peace“ while chewing the gum and dreaming of the adventures...

          Comment


          • #6
            Forrest wrote the poem for rednecks and let‘s say... some other little less educated people to SEARCH for the treasure, but the fact it‘s still out there tells me you need some more to FIND it and even some more to RETRIEVE it!

            I‘m sure you need special knowlege and intellect in several fields to really finish it, and I‘m not talking about certain degrees!

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Anna Graham
              Absolutely! Thankyou for allowing me to be the muse for your magnum opus. A magnum opus is a large and important work of art, music, or literature, especially one regarded as the most important work of an artist or writer. But you probably knew that…I’m directing that comment to any texas rednecks in the room who aren't educated or insightful enough to approach it like an intellectual. You are deceiving your audience, I did not dispute your assertion that understanding the meanings of words is essential to solving the puzzle.

              Here is my exact quote:



              I will reiterate that the poem has absolutely nothing to do with ancient glyphs or pictographs. But I suppose a certain god complex or infallibility comes with a three year medical degree from Toledo, (thanks for giving us your academic credentials). He designed this so that the average joe could solve the poem. He didnt design it for you. So while you’re mapping popcorn shops in Peoria, I’ve spent the last 3 and ½ years solving the poem using the poem and only the poem.

              Flutterby is an anagram of butterfly. You want to know why he said “the most common mistake that I see searchers make is that they underestimate the importance of the first clue. If you don’t have that one nailed down you might as well stay home and play canasta.” The object of canasta is to create melds. The definition of meld is a thing formed by merging or blending. Or why he said “it is fun to arrange words in such a way that you have to smile at the end of a sentence.” Think about it, I think an average Texas redneck could figure it out, with a good anagram solving program.

              I’ll give you the anagram for “I give you title to the gold.” It is: It give you light, toe led to. The first part of the anagram is a reference to the flashlight that he told you to bring on your trip along with a sandwich. But the real meaning of the statement “it give you light,” is it references a trail that you take on the journey. You come to a clearing in the trees and the light shines through and therefore “it give you light.” Toe led to, sounds like Toledo, it is also a hint that your going to have to put one foot in front of the other if your going to get from one point to another.

              So once again, I am not disputing your claim that understanding the meaning of words is essential to solving the poem. It is how you decipher the many hints spread throughout Forrest's writings. What I am saying is that specialized knowledge of ancient glyphs or pictograms will not help you solve the poem.
              It appears to me that you are "alledging" that us simple-minded folks stand as good a chance at solving this as them know-it-alls - if we just use our heads.

              Comment


              • #8
                oic

                Comment


                • #9
                  Define redneck.. what does that definition have to do with intellect? and once its defined are we talking about an individual opinion or true definition of the term? today's definition implies simple minded or uneducated. that's by no means the meaning of the word, maybe by today's standards but not in it's original context.

                  No place for the Biddies comes to mind... and maybe locating the treasure isn't a task well suited to biddies as they tend to assume. I took a bus ride through the southwest one time because I wanted to, I had the choice to fly take a train or rent a car but I had time. down the California coast through LA and Nevada via Los Vegas and on into Arizona, New Mexico and West Texas, I almost regretted the whole experience for obvious reasons save for one Individual, an elderly Hispanic gentleman from El Paso. The story he told, The wealth his family the things that he had seen and done, his businesses, he explained the difference to me between a Texican and a Mexican. a lot of tall tales from an elderly Hispanic gentleman on a greyhound buss. at least one gold tooth and a ratty faded denim jacket, He like me wanted to take the buss and meet people and see the country side. When we got to El Paso he pulled out his Louie Vutton wallet and handed me his card as he got off the bus and got into a limo. I looked up the name on the card he gave me he was legit, no names here but.... what defines redneck and ignorance, your opinion, twelve kids? Texas? or webster's....

                  Texas is so big that you can live your life within its limits and never give a damn about what anyone in Boston or San Francisco thinks.
                  Last edited by 1keyword; 09-09-2019, 04:49 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Anna Graham
                    Absolutely! Thankyou for allowing me to be the muse for your magnum opus. A magnum opus is a large and important work of art, music, or literature, especially one regarded as the most important work of an artist or writer. But you probably knew that…I’m directing that comment to any texas rednecks in the room who aren't educated or insightful enough to approach it like an intellectual. You are deceiving your audience, I did not dispute your assertion that understanding the meanings of words is essential to solving the puzzle.

                    Here is my exact quote:



                    I will reiterate that the poem has absolutely nothing to do with ancient glyphs or pictographs. But I suppose a certain god complex or infallibility comes with a three year medical degree from Toledo, (thanks for giving us your academic credentials). He designed this so that the average joe could solve the poem. He didnt design it for you. So while you’re mapping popcorn shops in Peoria, I’ve spent the last 3 and ½ years solving the poem using the poem and only the poem.

                    Flutterby is an anagram of butterfly. You want to know why he said “the most common mistake that I see searchers make is that they underestimate the importance of the first clue. If you don’t have that one nailed down you might as well stay home and play canasta.” The object of canasta is to create melds. The definition of meld is a thing formed by merging or blending. Or why he said “it is fun to arrange words in such a way that you have to smile at the end of a sentence.” Think about it, I think an average Texas redneck could figure it out, with a good anagram solving program.

                    I’ll give you the anagram for “I give you title to the gold.” It is: It give you light, toe led to. The first part of the anagram is a reference to the flashlight that he told you to bring on your trip along with a sandwich. But the real meaning of the statement “it give you light,” is it references a trail that you take on the journey. You come to a clearing in the trees and the light shines through and therefore “it give you light.” Toe led to, sounds like Toledo, it is also a hint that your going to have to put one foot in front of the other if your going to get from one point to another.

                    So once again, I am not disputing your claim that understanding the meaning of words is essential to solving the poem. It is how you decipher the many hints spread throughout Forrest's writings. What I am saying is that specialized knowledge of ancient glyphs or pictograms will not help you solve the poem.

                    p.s. the answer to the ultimate question of life, the universe, and everything is 42
                    First and foremost you know little to nothing about the ancient glyphs with which you think has no relation to the poem.
                    If you did you might understand while at one time long long ago it was enough of a language to unite all people in the region called the Middleeast. So much so that local warlords had to confuse the language and divide people. Because after all, warlords are all about feuding.

                    And the knowledge contained in the glyphs is not specialized unless you want to be able to read them. I know , some people have a hard time understanding what a Cattles head represents. Or a snake. Or a cross. Or a wooden tent peg. But that is because the type of people you consider specialists on the subject have still to this day confused what is a simple language. And the real experts won't tell you. It's part of their religious oath to keep you in the dark. And they seem to be doing a fine job at it.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Cowboyrocker View Post
                      Forrest wrote the poem for rednecks and let‘s say... some other little less educated people to SEARCH for the treasure, but the fact it‘s still out there tells me you need some more to FIND it and even some more to RETRIEVE it!

                      I‘m sure you need special knowlege and intellect in several fields to really finish it, and I‘m not talking about certain degrees!
                      People get degrees because they are good at regurgitating what their teachers tell them and are obedient to their masters. You know, those with Masters Degrees.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Rose Livingstone View Post
                        Einstein wasted 30+ years searching for a Theory of Everything?
                        Did you intentionally share a chewing gum labeled as marketed out of Toledo, OH, or is that a "coincidence"?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          TreasureCodex Stop harassing me. Your advances are unwelcome.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Covert One View Post

                            No time spent in thought is wasted.
                            That's one opinion. Here's another:
                            "Most of my intellectual offspring end up very young in the graveyard of disappointed hopes." -AE

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by vegfinnr View Post

                              Did you intentionally share a chewing gum labeled as marketed out of Toledo, OH, or is that a "coincidence"?
                              No it was as intentional as my comment sarcastic. I did leave out the references to chiclet ‘teeth’.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X