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  • Rodin

    Scrapbook 61 (4/23/2014): "It seems logical to me that a deep thinking treasure searcher could use logic to determine an important clue to the location of the treasure. Is someone doing that now and I don’t know it? It’s not what they say on the blogs that may be significant, it’s what they whisper. f"

    Scrapbook 165: https://dalneitzel.com/2017/01/24/sc...ed-sixty-five/
    Look 1:15 into the short video.

    Scrapbook 146 (the one with Forrest's ABC Ducks): https://dalneitzel.com/2015/09/28/sc...red-forty-six/
    Final picture:
    Click image for larger version

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    The Detroit Institute of Arts Museum (location of the Indulgence sister casket). What's out front?
    https://www.google.com/maps/@42.3591...6!8i2688?hl=en

  • #2
    The Forest Whisperer

    https://gwent.fandom.com/wiki/Forest_Whisperer

    Click image for larger version

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    Last edited by TreasureCodex; 08-08-2019, 01:56 PM.

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    • #3
      If you subtract the (K) from think, it anagrams to the word hint.

      So is there something about the letter K that might be important?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by ksfromKS View Post
        If you subtract the (K) from think, it anagrams to the word hint.

        So is there something about the letter K that might be important?
        I don't see where the word think is.
        Thinker using your logic would be Rehint or Hinter

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        • #5
          TreasureCodex I was using the source of the word. It is difficult to be a thinker without a think, I think. I don't always play by the rules, but I do like to share thoughts.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by ksfromKS View Post
            TreasureCodex I was using the source of the word. It is difficult to be a thinker without a think, I think. I don't always play by the rules, but I do like to share thoughts.
            OK, so here is the origination of "The Thinker"

            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Gates_of_Hell

            " The Thinker was initially named The Poet (French: Le Poète), and was part of a large commission begun in 1880 for a doorway surround called The Gates of Hell. "

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            Last edited by TreasureCodex; 08-08-2019, 04:42 PM.

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            • #7
              3 ducks/wrappers purple marvel gaze the nest thing again. Reflection at the hidey.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by TreasureCodex View Post

                OK, so here is the origination of "The Thinker"

                https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Gates_of_Hell

                " The Thinker was initially named The Poet (French: Le Poète), and was part of a large commission begun in 1880 for a doorway surround called The Gates of Hell. "

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                That brings to mind "How deep is a hole?"

                I think the answer to that depends on how much you want to dig.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by ksfromKS View Post

                  That brings to mind "How deep is a hole?"

                  I think the answer to that depends on how much you want to dig.
                  There is always a surface to a hole.
                  And not just the "Thinker/Poet" has been parsed from it's origin. So has many other figures.
                  But let's look at The Gates Of Hell of a moment and see what the Architect has done.

                  http://www.rodinmuseum.org/collectio...ontheme/4.html

                  " Third Architectural Model for "The Gates of Hell" "
                  Auguste Rodin


                  Third Architectural Model for "The Gates of Hell"
                  Rodin had originally intended to portray The Divine Comedy in eight symmetrical panels based on The Gates of Paradise (1425–52), a set of massive bronze doors for the Baptistery of San Giovanni in Florence created by Lorenzo Ghiberti (Italian, 1378–1455). However, Rodin's design soon gave way to a much more chaotic, fluid interpretation, akin to Michelangelo's (Italian, 1475–1564) Last Judgment painted on the altar wall of the Sistine Chapel. In conceiving his hell, Rodin was also attracted to the more contemporary poems of Charles Baudelaire (French, 1821–1867), which described hell as a place existing only in man's mind.
                  This is the third maquette, or model, Rodin made after receiving the commission for The Gates of Hell. The Thinker is the only figure to maintain his place of prominence in all stages of The Gates, from this model, where he seems to sit on an actual cross, to the finished doors, where he can be found atop the cross-shaped intersection of the doors and the lintel.


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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by TreasureCodex View Post

                    There is always a surface to a hole.
                    And not just the "Thinker/Poet" has been parsed from it's origin. So has many other figures.
                    But let's look at The Gates Of Hell of a moment and see what the Architect has done.

                    http://www.rodinmuseum.org/collectio...ontheme/4.html

                    " Third Architectural Model for "The Gates of Hell" "
                    Auguste Rodin


                    Third Architectural Model for "The Gates of Hell"
                    Rodin had originally intended to portray The Divine Comedy in eight symmetrical panels based on The Gates of Paradise (1425–52), a set of massive bronze doors for the Baptistery of San Giovanni in Florence created by Lorenzo Ghiberti (Italian, 1378–1455). However, Rodin's design soon gave way to a much more chaotic, fluid interpretation, akin to Michelangelo's (Italian, 1475–1564) Last Judgment painted on the altar wall of the Sistine Chapel. In conceiving his hell, Rodin was also attracted to the more contemporary poems of Charles Baudelaire (French, 1821–1867), which described hell as a place existing only in man's mind.
                    This is the third maquette, or model, Rodin made after receiving the commission for The Gates of Hell. The Thinker is the only figure to maintain his place of prominence in all stages of The Gates, from this model, where he seems to sit on an actual cross, to the finished doors, where he can be found atop the cross-shaped intersection of the doors and the lintel.

                    Which then takes us to Florence and the " Gates Of Paradise "
                    And what do we find there ?
                    Allegorical units

                    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lorenzo_Ghiberti

                    Click image for larger version

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by TreasureCodex View Post

                      There is always a surface to a hole.
                      And not just the "Thinker/Poet" has been parsed from it's origin. So has many other figures.
                      But let's look at The Gates Of Hell of a moment and see what the Architect has done.

                      http://www.rodinmuseum.org/collectio...ontheme/4.html

                      " Third Architectural Model for "The Gates of Hell" "
                      Auguste Rodin


                      Third Architectural Model for "The Gates of Hell"
                      Rodin had originally intended to portray The Divine Comedy in eight symmetrical panels based on The Gates of Paradise (1425–52), a set of massive bronze doors for the Baptistery of San Giovanni in Florence created by Lorenzo Ghiberti (Italian, 1378–1455). However, Rodin's design soon gave way to a much more chaotic, fluid interpretation, akin to Michelangelo's (Italian, 1475–1564) Last Judgment painted on the altar wall of the Sistine Chapel. In conceiving his hell, Rodin was also attracted to the more contemporary poems of Charles Baudelaire (French, 1821–1867), which described hell as a place existing only in man's mind.
                      This is the third maquette, or model, Rodin made after receiving the commission for The Gates of Hell. The Thinker is the only figure to maintain his place of prominence in all stages of The Gates, from this model, where he seems to sit on an actual cross, to the finished doors, where he can be found atop the cross-shaped intersection of the doors and the lintel.

                      " This is the third maquette, or model, Rodin made after receiving the commission for The Gates of Hell. The Thinker is the only figure to maintain his place of prominence in all stages of The Gates, from this model, where he seems to sit on an actual cross, to the finished doors, where he can be found atop the cross-shaped intersection of the doors and the lintel. "

                      The Poet/ Forrest Fenn X

                      Click image for larger version

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                      • #12
                        That is definitely a deep crossroad, maybe too deep for me.

                        Am I understanding that the connection you are making to his comment about deep thinking is to direct us to heavy loads (hell?), pictured in the book on 99? Which is a representation of the special spot where he hid his treasure?

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                        • #13
                          Ooo! I know what this reference means!
                          Questing song: Iron Maiden's "Quest for Fire" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_ppwIZ0EnXg

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by ksfromKS View Post
                            That is definitely a deep crossroad, maybe too deep for me.

                            Am I understanding that the connection you are making to his comment about deep thinking is to direct us to heavy loads (hell?), pictured in the book on 99? Which is a representation of the special spot where he hid his treasure?
                            I'm just showing the symbolism with The Thinker/Poet that appears obvious.
                            Hell is a fictitious notion today.
                            Hell or Hellas was what the ancient Greeks called their land.

                            https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Name_of_Greece

                            " but the Greeks called their land Hellas "
                            ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                            Lake Of Fire was a real place outside of Jerusalem where debris was dumped and burned along with political dissenters.
                            The Greeks had a crematorium near there that was known as "the second death "

                            So now you know where the story of Hell evolved from.
                            Last edited by TreasureCodex; 08-08-2019, 07:42 PM.

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                            • #15
                              TreasureCodex Thanks for sharing that information, I appreciate your thoughts. I agree the symbolism is fascinating and is definitely a facet of the poem, IMO. Certainly concepts and ideas a deep thinker and/or a poet tinkers with.

                              I didn't know about the Lake of Fire, or the crematorium. Nor did I know the Greeks called their lands Hellas, so I found all of that interesting. I will have to read more about those things just out of my own curiosity.

                              It is difficult to filter so much information down into a manageable aspect that helps to understand some of these comments FF has made, to in turn narrow down the search area.


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